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The main news sites are ignoring Fukushima, so I thought I'd start a thread for updates.

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Location: Maui, Hawaii | Registered: June 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Some of the best factual and knowledgeable reports on the whole disaster are here:

http://www.fairewinds.com/updates

Basicaly the whole of the northern hemisphere has had fallout from this including plenty in the US.

Moderated to keep this thread about news updates, not debate - Shaun

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Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Ttommy:
Some of the best factual and knowledgeable reports on the whole disaster are here:

http://www.fairewinds.com/updates

As for it being a local issue, that is so far off the mark it isn't funny.
Basicaly the whole of the northern hemisphere has had fallout from this including plenty in the US. the fact they have stopped testing for radiation in the US tells you how bad the problem is and how much they are trying to hide it.

This is nothing short of the worst disaster and biggest coverup in human history and it's far from over yet.

Thanks for the link.

This is a thread about new information specifically about Fukushima, not a debate about nuclear power in general, or would of/could of/should of scenarios, so let's keep it focused on Fukushima and continuing updates.

Here's a news article from May 13 about the beginning of the massive costs of this disaster:
http://www.abc.net.au/news/sto...7.htm?section=justin

Japan agrees on nuclear compensation scheme

By North Asia correspondent Mark Willacy

Updated Fri May 13, 2011 2:18pm AEST
Residents screened for radiation

Japan will inject more than $60 billion worth of special-purpose bonds into a compensation fund. (Reuters: Kim Kyung Hoon)

* Audio: TEPCO admits nuclear reactor had meltdown (AM)
* Related Story: Japan to cull nuclear-affected livestock
* Related Story: Japan's stricken nuclear plant has new leak
* Related Story: Workers enter crippled Fukushima reactor

The Japanese government will provide tens of billions of dollars to the operator of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant to help the company pay compensation to victims of the nuclear crisis...

...With the operator of Fukushima, TEPCO, facing compensation payouts in the tens of billions of dollars, the Japanese government has approved a plan to prop up the company.

It will inject more than $60 billion worth of special-purpose bonds into a compensation fund and will also offer the company loans.

The government has also set six conditions that TEPCO must meet to receive state support, including selling company securities, real estate and other assets, and reducing its workforce...


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Location: Maui, Hawaii | Registered: June 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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http://arstechnica.com/science...d-3-may-have-too.ars

A virtual admission of the lies Tepco and the jap Gubbermint have been spouting so far and puts the seriousness of the situation a littel more honestly.
Just the same, if this is waht they are admitting to, I wonder what they know that they are not mentioning??
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by john galt:

Based on actual facts, not alarmist conjecture, this incident is looking more like Three Mile Island than Chernobyl.


A scan through your posted news link makes clear that Fukushima is worse than 3 Mile:

TOKYO—Japanese officials on Monday reiterated their commitment to bring the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex under control within the original six- to nine-month timetable announced in mid-April, despite recent discoveries that its reactors are more heavily damaged than previously believed.

They hope to have it under control in 6-9 months... SUB


The prime minister's special adviser on the nuclear issue, Goshi Hosono, said the plan is realistic because the reactors are continuing to cool down and coming closer to a safe condition. "Some of the reactors are coming close to achieving a cold shutdown," he said.

"Some of the reactors are coming closer to a safe condition...." That sounds like many of the reactors are unsafe- SUB


Tokyo Electric, also known as Tepco, said Sunday it had found substantial damage to the fuel cores at the plant's Nos. 2 and 3 reactors. The revelation followed an acknowledgment Thursday that a similar meltdown of the core took place at Unit No. 1.

Tepco said one of the key causes of a rapid meltdown at Unit No. 1 was the failure of two emergency cooling mechanisms—the suppression pool and the isolation condenser—to perform their intended functions.

They had multiple meltdowns

The suppression pool holds thousands of tons of water in a concrete tube located underneath the containment vessel that houses the reactor. Water there is normally used for controlling the amount of steam and the level of pressure inside the containment vessel, but can also be used for cooling the reactor.

An isolation condenser circulates steam in a tank of cold water, converts it into water and returns it back into the reactor. The equipment can function without external power by receiving naturally rising steam from the reactor, although the condenser does require some battery power to allow its valves to operate.

According to Tepco, workers were unable to pump the water into the reactor from the suppression pool due to the breakdown of an emergency diesel engine, which was submerged in the tsunami.

The isolation condenser kicked in immediately after the earthquake, but it too lost function after the emergency battery was submerged in the tsunami, said Junichi Matsumoto, Tepco spokesman on nuclear issues.

"The battery could have survived had there been better protection against the tsunami," Mr. Matsumoto said.

"It's possible the condenser failed to function properly," said Keiji Miyazaki, a professor emeritus of nuclear engineering at Osaka University. "Without the supply of any cooling water, fuel will naturally start melting within a few hours."

Batteries, which can store power for some time even after the external power is cut off, may have died relatively quickly or didn't function at all, experts say.

"Batteries may be able to power small equipment like meters for several hours," said Hiroaki Koide, assistant professor at Research Reactor Institute at Kyoto University. "They don't have much lasting power when used to operate big machinery such as an isolation condenser."

and the backup batteries failed, which prevented the 'failsafe' backup from functioning SUB


3 Mile Island:
"The NRC's authorization of the release of 40,000 gallons of radioactive waste water directly in the Susquehanna River led to a loss of credibility with the press and community.[2]" -Wiki

We'll never know how many gallons of contaminated water are being released from Fukushima.

This situation is far from over, by all accounts, and the only 'facts' I will believe about contamination are those I collect myself on a vacation to Japan with a geiger counter- Unfortunately I am too busy to make that trip.
 
Location: Vancouver Island, Canada | Registered: September 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v..._BM&feature=youtu.be

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Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you want to post a link to a story post some commentary about the story as well. Posting only links is annoying.

When posting a youtube video, embed them within the post - directions: Below the youtube video there is a tab titled "share", click on that then click on the embed tab, copy, in your post click on the video tab which will give you this [FLASH_VIDEO ] [/FLASH_VIDEO ] , and paste the embedded youtube content between the two, that's it.


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Location: Maui, Hawaii | Registered: June 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Japan’s Fukushima Reactor May Have Leaked Radiation Before Tsunami Struck
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/...on-before-quake.html

Tepco has claimed that Fukushima stood up to the 9.0 earthquake, but this news story indicates that may not have been the case. "A monitoring post on the perimeter of the plant about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile) from the No. 1 reactor went off at 3:29 p.m., minutes before the station was overwhelmed by the tsunami that knocked out backup power that kept reactor cooling systems running, according to documents supplied by the company. The monitor was set to go off at high levels of radiation, an official said."


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Location: Maui, Hawaii | Registered: June 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Radioactivity In The Oceans After Fukushima Disaster
http://www.irishweatheronline....-disaster/15030.html

This is about the impact of Fukushima on the ocaeans.

"When it comes to the oceans, however,” says Buesseler, “the impact of Fukushima exceeds Chernobyl.”

Radionuclides in seawater have been reported from the Fukushima plant’s discharge canals, from coastal waters five to ten kilometres south of the plant, and from 30 kilometres offshore. “Levels of some radionuclides are at least an order of magnitude higher than the highest levels in 1986 in the Baltic and Black Seas, the two ocean water bodies closest to Chernobyl,” says Buesseler."


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Location: Maui, Hawaii | Registered: June 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A report comparing the " Official" BS being given previously and the predictions of independent experts as to what has now been admitted which was what they said in the first place and denied and a very telling explaination of the immense problems faced in bringing the situation under control.

http://lewrockwell.com/orig12/martenson6.1.1.html
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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As the Japanese government and TEPCO struggle to bring the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant under control, a group of pensioners has decided to put their lives at risk to save younger people from radiation.
...
Yamada also explained that the initiative was not a kamikaze action at all, but one that has been very well thought through. "Things have to be done in a team," he said. "Our project should be part of a long-term plan under state control. We have to examine people’s skills very carefully to find out what tasks are appropriate for them."
...
But there will be certain conditions even though they are volunteers, said Sasaki. "We have our dignity as people. We need guarantees, also regarding illness. Our willingness to work should not be exploited. Our work has to take place according to appropriate moral standards."

Not surprising in a culture where people turn in money and other valuables found in the tsunami wreckage instead of looting.

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Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ramifications and perspective of the Fukishima Disaster and it's effects on the world as a whole.

http://www.shoah.org.uk/2011/0...ny-chernobyls-is-it/
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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From the Rachel Maddow show. Talks about the news that the Fukushima reactor cores not only melted down, but melted thru the containment. And other stuff.



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Location: Maui, Hawaii | Registered: June 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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TOKYO (Reuters) - A rise in radiation halted the clean-up of radioactive water at Japan's Fukushimi nuclear power station on Saturday hours after it got under way, a fresh setback to efforts to restore control over the quake-stricken plant.

The power plant has been leaking radiation into the atmosphere ever since the March 11 quake and tsunami and both China and South Korea have expressed concern over the possibility of further leaks into the sea.

Tokyo Electric Power Company, the operator of the Fukushima Daiichi plant, said it expected to resume the clean-up within a week.

The plan hit a new hurdle as Japan marked 100 days since the earthquake and tsunami left nearly 24,000 dead or missing and knocked out cooling systems at the plant. Buddhist memorial services were held throughout the country on the day when the bereaved traditionally seek closure from grief.

A statement issued by the utility, known as Tepco, said the suspension was prompted by a faster than expected rise in radiation in a part of the system intended to absorb caesium.

"At the moment, we haven't specified the reason," a Tepco spokesman told a news conference. "So we can't say when we can resume the operation. But I'd say it's not something that would take weeks."

The official said teams working at the plant believed the radiation rise could be linked either to sludge flowing into the machinery absorbing caesium or a monitoring error caused by nearby pipes carrying contaminated water.

But a resumption, he said, was critical to deal with the highly radioactive water. Officials say 110,000 tons, the equivalent of 40 Olympic swimming pools -- is stored at the plant, 240 km (150 miles) northeast of Tokyo.

"Unless we can resume the operation within a week, we will have problems in disposing of the contaminated water," the official said.

"But if this is caused by the reasons we are thinking, we can resume the operation within a week."

The official said Tepco for the moment foresaw no delay in its overall plan to bring the Fukushima Daiichi plant fully under control by the end of the year.

The plan, derided by some critics as too optimistic, calls for a shutdown of its three unstable reactors by January 2012.

STORING CONTAMINATED WATER

The company is fighting against time as the plant is running out of places to store the contaminated water. Amounts quickly accumulate as the company pumps in vast supplies to cool three reactors that went into meltdown after the tsunami disabled cooling systems.

The cleanup operation is one of many steps to stabilize the reactors. It got under way only late on Friday after being delayed by a series of glitches.

Trade Minister Banri Kaieda, addressing a news conference, said he had told Tepco to resume the cleanup operation while upholding safety standards, but set no deadlines.

He said government inspections showed all nuclear power plants in Japan had adequate safety measures against severe accidents and called on local governments to give the green light to restarting reactors.

Routine maintenance and public concern since the Fukushima accident have left only 19 of 54 reactors still functioning.

"Power shortages are a big problem for the economy. I would like to seek the understanding of people who live near plants so we can restart power plants that are confirmed to be safe," he said.

Nuclear operators always seek local government approval in recognition of the importance of support from residents near the plant -- though such backing is not legally required.

Opposition to nuclear power is growing, with one survey this week saying three-quarters of Japanese voters wanting to see a gradual phase out of nuclear power.

The crisis has prompted the government to go back to "scratch" in considering the future of nuclear power.

Mainichi Shimbun reported on Saturday that Kunio Hiramatsu, mayor of Osaka, Japan's second largest city, said he would make a proposal to Kansai Electric Power, of which the city is a top shareholder, that the company eventually phase out nuclear power.

(Reporting by Hideyuki Sano; Editing by Ron Popeski)
 
Location: Vancouver Island, Canada | Registered: September 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This CNN video contains maybe the quote of the year - "We 'came close' to losing northern Japan".



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Location: Maui, Hawaii | Registered: June 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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AP

Some scientists say Fukushima is worse than the 1986 Chernobyl accident, with which it shares a maximum level-7 rating on the sliding scale of nuclear disasters.

Yoshio Ichida is recalling the worst day of his 53 years: 11 March, when the sea swallowed up his home and killed his friends. The Fukushima fisherman was in the bath when the huge quake hit and barely made it to the open sea in his boat in the 40 minutes before the 15-metre tsunami that followed. When he got back to port, his neighbourhood and nearly everything else was gone. "Nobody can remember anything like this," he says.

Now living in a refugee centre in the ruined coastal city of Soma, Mr Ichida has mourned the 100 local fishermen killed in the disaster and is trying to rebuild his life with his colleagues. Every morning, they arrive at the ruined fisheries co-operative building in Soma port and prepare for work. Then they stare out at the irradiated sea, and wait. "Some day we know we'll be allowed to fish again. We all want to believe that."

This nation has recovered from worse natural – and manmade – catastrophes. But it is the triple meltdown and its aftermath at the Fukushima nuclear power plant 40km down the coast from Soma that has elevated Japan into unknown, and unknowable, terrain. Across the northeast, millions of people are living with its consequences and searching for a consensus on a safe radiation level that does not exist. Experts give bewilderingly different assessments of its dangers.

Some scientists say Fukushima is worse than the 1986 Chernobyl accident, with which it shares a maximum level-7 rating on the sliding scale of nuclear disasters. One of the most prominent of them is Dr Helen Caldicott, an Australian physician and long time anti-nuclear activist who warns of "horrors to come" in Fukushima.

Chris Busby, a professor at the University of Ulster known for his alarmist views, generated controversy during a Japan visit last month when he said the disaster would result in more than 1 million deaths. "Fukushima is still boiling its radionuclides all over Japan," he said. "Chernobyl went up in one go. So Fukushima is worse."

On the other side of the nuclear fence are the industry friendly scientists who insist that the crisis is under control and radiation levels are mostly safe. "I believe the government and Tokyo Electric Power [Tepco, the plant's operator] are doing their best," said Naoto Sekimura, vice-dean of the Graduate School of Engineering at the University of Tokyo. Mr Sekimura initially advised residents near the plant that a radioactive disaster was "unlikely" and that they should stay "calm", an assessment he has since had to reverse.

Slowly, steadily, and often well behind the curve, the government has worsened its prognosis of the disaster. Last Friday, scientists affiliated with the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said the plant had released 15,000 terabecquerels of cancer-causing Cesium, equivalent to about 168 times the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima, the event that ushered in the nuclear age. (Professor Busby says the release is at least 72,000 times worse than Hiroshima).

Caught in a blizzard of often conflicting information, many Japanese instinctively grope for the beacons they know. Mr Ichida and his colleagues say they no longer trust the nuclear industry or the officials who assured them the Fukushima plant was safe. But they have faith in government radiation testing and believe they will soon be allowed back to sea.

That's a mistake, say sceptics, who note a consistent pattern of official lying, foot-dragging and concealment. Last week, officials finally admitted something long argued by its critics: that thousands of people with homes near the crippled nuclear plant may not be able to return for a generation or more. "We can't rule out the possibility that there will be some areas where it will be hard for residents to return to their homes for a long time," said Yukio Edano, the government's top government spokesman. "We are very sorry."

Last Friday, hundreds of former residents from Futaba and Okuma, the towns nearest the plant, were allowed to visit their homes – perhaps for the last time – to pick up belongings. Wearing masks and radiation suits, they drove through the 20km contaminated zone around the plant, where hundreds of animals have died and rotted in the sun, to find kitchens and living rooms partly reclaimed by nature. "It's hard to believe we ever lived here," one former resident told NHK.

Several other areas northwest of the plant have become atomic ghost towns after being ordered to evacuate – too late, say many residents, who believe they absorbed dangerous quantities of radiation in the weeks after the accident. "We've no idea when we can come back," says Katsuzo Shoji, who farmed rice and cabbages and kept a small herd of cattle near Iitate, a picturesque village about 40km from the plant.

Although it is outside the exclusion zone, the village's mountainous topography meant radiation, carried by wind and rain, lingered, poisoning crops, water and school playgrounds.

The young, the wealthy, mothers and pregnant women left for Tokyo or elsewhere. Most of the remaining 6000 people have since evacuated, after the government accepted that safe radiation limits had been exceeded.

Mr Shoji, 75, went from shock to rage, then despair when the government told him he would have to destroy his vegetables, kill his six cows and move with his wife Fumi, 73, to an apartment in Koriyama, about 20km away. "We've heard five, maybe 10 years but some say that's far too optimistic," he says, crying. "Maybe I'll be able to come home to die." He was given initial compensation of one million yen (£7,900) by Tepco, topped up with 350,000 yen from the government.

It is the fate of people outside the evacuation zones, however, that causes the most bitter controversy. Parents in Fukushima City, 63km from the plant, have banded together to demand that the government do more to protect about 100,000 children. Schools have banned soccer and other outdoor sports. Windows are kept closed. "We've just been left to fend for ourselves," says Machiko Sato, a grandmother who lives in the city. "It makes me so angry."

Many parents have already sent their children to live with relatives or friends hundreds of kilometres away. Some want the government to evacuate the entire two million population of Fukushima Prefecture. "They're demanding the right to be able to evacuate," says anti-nuclear activist Aileen Mioko Smith, who works with the parents. "In other words, if they evacuate they want the government to support them."

So far, at least, the authorities say that is not necessary. The official line is that the accident at the plant is winding down and radiation levels outside of the exclusion zone and designated "hot spots" are safe.

But many experts warn that the crisis is just beginning. Professor Tim Mousseau, a biological scientist who has spent more than a decade researching the genetic impact of radiation around Chernobyl, says he worries that many people in Fukushima are "burying their heads in the sand." His Chernobyl research concluded that biodiversity and the numbers of insects and spiders had shrunk inside the irradiated zone, and the bird population showed evidence of genetic defects, including smaller brain sizes.

"The truth is that we don't have sufficient data to provide accurate information on the long-term impact," he says. "What we can say, though, is that there are very likely to be very significant long-term health impact from prolonged exposure."

In Soma, Mr Ichida says all the talk about radiation is confusing. "All we want to do is get back to work. There are many different ways to die, and having nothing to do is one of them."

Economic cost
Fukushima: Japan has estimated it will cost as much as £188bn to rebuild following the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis.
Chernobyl There are a number of estimates of the economic impact, but thetotal cost is thought to be about £144bn.

Safety
Fukushima: workers are allowed to operate in the crippled plant up to a dose of 250mSv (millisieverts).
Chernobyl: People exposed to 350mSv were relocated. In most countries the maximum annual dosage for a worker is 20mSv. The allowed dose for someone living close to a nuclear plant is 1mSv a year.

Death toll
Fukushima: Two workers died inside the plant. Some scientists predict that one million lives will be lost to cancer.
Chernobyl: It is difficult to say how many people died on the day of the disaster because of state security, but Greenpeace estimates that 200,000 have died from radiation-linked cancers in the 25 years since the accident.

Exclusion zone
Fukushima: Tokyo initially ordered a 20km radius exclusion zone around the plant
Chernobyl: The initial radius of the Chernobyl zone was set at 30km – 25 years later it is still largely in place.

Compensation
Fukushima: Tepco's share price has collapsed since the disaster largely because of the amount it will need to pay out, about £10,000 a person
Chernobyl: Not a lot. It has been reported that Armenian victims of the disaster were offered about £6 each in 1986

Aid
Fukushima: The UN's Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs reported bilateral aid worth $95m
Chernobyl: 12 years after the disaster, the then Ukrainian president, Leonid Kuchma, complained that his country was still waiting for international help.
 
Location: Vancouver Island, Canada | Registered: September 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Bullshift. Do your homework. The Fukushima plant is 40 year old obsolete nuclear technology. Would you expect a 1971 car to be as safe and reliable as a 2011 model?

The plant was slated for decommissioning, so they took a gamble and didn't spend the money to make it totally tsunami proof. They gambled and lost.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Bullshift. Do your homework. The Fukushima plant is 40 year old obsolete nuclear technology. Would you expect a 1971 car to be as safe and reliable as a 2011 model?

The plant was slated for decommissioning, so they took a gamble and didn't spend the money to make it totally tsunami proof. They gambled and lost.


Obviously they never made it tsunami proof 40 years ago when they built it!
It's not something that just happened of late.

YOU should do YOUR Homework John. I know you like to make excuses for everything you want to champion but the plant and may others like it has LONG record of safety breaches going back over a decade. The operators couldn't even maintain the thing to the safety stands of 40 years ago it was built to.

And that's the problem with these sources of mass destruction and damage, it's not the machinery, it's the humanity.
There will always be some stuff up, some manager or exec that wants to cut corners to make the bottom line look better, some lazy or corrupt inspector and some factor that gives rise to these things causing untold damage to the environment and the people living in it for thousands of miles around.

I know you spout a lot of garbage just for the reaction value but I'm stuffed if I know how someone that carry's on and boasts the way you do about how clean your vehicle runs and how they should add bio to all diesel to make it run cleaner can ignore the incredible damage this one nuke event has caused to the environment that will last forever more.

Next time you go to brag about your magic clean running vehicle, just remember it doesn't matter a dam because in the grand scheme of things, all the veg/ bio users in the world will NEVER be able to come close to offsetting the damage this one event you are so determined to stick your head in the sand has caused.
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Dirty, polluting coal is the backbone of Australia's economy. Their anti-nuke hypocrisy is expected. The amount of toxic pollution spewed into the environment by Oz coal is thousands of times more detrimental than what escapes from all the nuclear power plants.

Coal fired pollution is profitable; it's always about the money. You're not fooling anyone.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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