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yes but in a sealed system the oxygen is consumed by the corrosion so the corrosion must stop.
 
Location: Australia | Registered: July 17, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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AFTER HOW MUCH CORROSION - PERHAPS IT'S THEN TOO LATE!
 
Registered: November 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Brand new auto coolant has corrosion eaters that work very well: I use this to clean rust off of parts, old tools, etc. If you use glycol and an insulated tank to hold hot glycol in, a small pump can feed a copper pipe in the bottom of the reactor to heat the oil. The glycol will also help prevent corrosion. If done this way, the same collectors can provide heat for dewatering, reactor, methanol recovery, and washing (pre heat water).
 
Location: Houston, TX | Registered: March 30, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Wow! That Solar heating WVO post has attracted a few hits. An update...Well, the 'ol solar panels are still working fine at heating up the WVO (up to 450 litres). Had to replace a few of the 55 watt pool pumps that circulate the oil... most of them are cheap plastic things and the mounts eventually break...otherwise things are going well. Er.. I had to replace a panel when a cow trod on the glass and smashed it!!

I highly recommend used solar hot water panels for heating oil. Very efficient and cheap!
Scube
 
Registered: August 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by scube:
To reduce electricity costs I am in the process of setting up a solar heating system for heating up WVO before the biodiesel reaction. I am using a couple of 2nd hand solar hot water panels to do it. Has anyone experimented with this?
I hoping the sun will generate enough thermo-suction to suck the oil through the panels like it normally do to water.
I am looking at heating 500 litres or so of oil for my reaction. I may have an issue with keeping the oil hot as I don't have a storage tank, just the panels. i am thinking I will run it straight from the panels into my reaction tank.
If all goes to plan I won't have to heat the oil at all with electricity.
 
Registered: September 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Scube,
Great to hear that someone out there realized tapping the sun's energy isn't that far off into the future.
I just took a class on solar, and I am really stoked about designing a solar heater to run the biodiesel reaction. I was hoping you had the time to answer a few questions for me...

What model solahart are you using and what size? to heat that many Liters of oil, i'm guessing quite large 4-5 m^2 range?

Are you still using Veggie oil as the heat transfer fluid?

Does the system automatically turn the pump on to maximize heat gain? or do you do it manually?

How do you maintain the reaction temperature throughout the reaction period?

I will probably have more questions as I delve into designing a small scale solar heated system. Anyone else out there working on such things?

Thanks!! Solar for the win!

~Ryan


Chemical & Energy Engineering -- The Pennsylvania State University
 
Registered: May 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Hi tokashila,
Ok I can answer some of those questions right now,
the others I will have to get some more info for you.
What model solahart are you using and what size? to heat that many Liters of oil, i'm guessing quite large 4-5 m^
Don't know the model, have to check. Using two panels- 4 square metres is prob right.

Scube
Are you still using Veggie oil as the heat transfer fluid?
I am circulating the vegie oil directly through the panels to heat up the oil for the reaction. if that is what you mean then yes!
Does the system automatically turn the pump on to maximize heat gain? or do you do it manually?
The system is simple, no automatic pumps or anything. Sunny day and i want to make some fuel, I go and turn on the pump in the morning.
Oil is circulating and heating up. I leave it for 3 or so hours and feel the side of the tank to see how hot it is.
How do you maintain the reaction temperature throughout the reaction period?
As soon as the oil is drained out of the storage tanks it is losing heat so I basically prepare to make the fuel as soon as I drain the tanks into my reaction vessel.
I should get around to posting some photos eh!!
 
Registered: August 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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scube,
"on a cloudy day it took 3-4 hours to heat 250 l to 50-55ºC" what time of the year and what is your North or South latitude? And did you ever measure the size of the panels? You need to be aware that copper catalyzes the oxidation of points of unsaturation of the fatty acid chains.

Best regards
 
Location: NorCal | Registered: September 23, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am looking to build a WVO/UCO solar heater on top of our shipping container. The pipe work will be 1" black Polyethelene with fussion welded joints. The box structure will be painted black with perspex front. The whole unit will be conected to the bund so that should the pipe burst the spill would be contained.

slabs


Home of Good Biodiesel http://www.cambridgebiodiesel.org

2000 Vauxhall (GM) 1.7 NA IDI Combo, Bosch VE, coolant heated fuel heater. In-tank strainer drilled out and inline filter fitted. Using FAME and veg oil blends.
 
Location: Cambridge, United Kingdom | Registered: October 21, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have been thinking of making a solar pre-heater using an insulated box mounted to the side of my shed, facing the sun, with double pane glazing. The oil would flow through 3" black plastic sewer pipe, and the interior of the box would also be painted black to attract heat. I would install this between my initial settling tank and processor, and size it so it would hold enough oil for a batch.

Will it work or will I have problems with the sewer pipe?


Jeff
1995 F250 4x4 Powerstroke
2000 TDI Beetle
1982 300D project
 
Location: Black Hills of South Dakota | Registered: May 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<DCS>
posted
quote:
Originally posted by stellar:
Hi friends

This is a nice thought. Can anyone tell me that how can we implement this ideas into our daily life.

Joseph


Is there some reason you keep posting the same sort of completely irrelevant and useless comments??

Looking up your posts, all you have been doing is making the same kind of comments over and over which are becoming idiotic through their volume and irrelevancy.

Perhaps you are practicing to become a full blown scammer or something?

I would suggest you either contribute something useful or don't say anything at all.
 
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<sunnybp>
posted
Solar powered motion sensor lamp
Solar power is a clean and ecologically sound alternative to electric, battery and other sources of power. There is no pollution produced, no non-renewable resources used, and it costs far less than other power sources. Even if you don’t choose to use solar power for all your household needs, you can still help the environment by choosing solar motion lamps . Every small bit of solar power used decreases the worlds usage of less ecological methods.
The principle of work for solar motion lamps:
solar motion lamps work by collecting solar power during the day through solar cells located on the light. This solar energy is used to recharge a battery (usually a NiCad rechargeable battery), which in turn powers the lamp at night.
solar motion lamps usually use a strong LED lamp. LEDs are an excellent choice for solar lamps because they use far less power than traditional bulbs and halogen lamps.
The application of solar motion lamps:
solar motion lamps are built with weather resistant materials, so they can be left on your homes exterior in all types of conditions.
Some models of solar panels include solar motion lamps that are strong enough to collect energy even in overcast conditions, making the lamp even more useful. You can set the duration that the lamp shines when it detects motion (any where from 0.5 minute to 3 minutes), as well as being able to position it so that it can detect motion up to 90 feet away. The trigger for the motion lamp is a passive infrared motion detector that is safe for use around all people and animals, and does not require additional high tech equipment.
solar motion lamps are an excellent way to keep your home and property safe from intruders and other problems, all while being cheaper and more green than other choices. You also have the choice of mounting your solar motion lamps on a post (this will be provided) or on the side of your house or garage.
If you need just one or many, the solar powered versions of motion lamps are the easiest choice for your lighting needs.

www.sunnybp.com
 
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quote:
Originally posted by sunnybp:
Solar powered motion sensor lamp
Solar power is a clean and ecologically sound alternative to electric, battery and other sources of power. There is no pollution produced, no non-renewable resources used, and it costs far less than other power sources. Even if you don’t choose to use solar power for all your household needs, you can still help the environment by choosing solar motion lamps . Every small bit of solar power used decreases the worlds usage of less ecological methods.
The principle of work for solar motion lamps:
solar motion lamps work by collecting solar power during the day through solar cells located on the light. This solar energy is used to recharge a battery (usually a NiCad rechargeable battery), which in turn powers the lamp at night.
solar motion lamps usually use a strong LED lamp. LEDs are an excellent choice for solar lamps because they use far less power than traditional bulbs and halogen lamps.
The application of solar motion lamps:
solar motion lamps are built with weather resistant materials, so they can be left on your homes exterior in all types of conditions.
Some models of solar panels include solar motion lamps that are strong enough to collect energy even in overcast conditions, making the lamp even more useful. You can set the duration that the lamp shines when it detects motion (any where from 0.5 minute to 3 minutes), as well as being able to position it so that it can detect motion up to 90 feet away. The trigger for the motion lamp is a passive infrared motion detector that is safe for use around all people and animals, and does not require additional high tech equipment.
solar motion lamps are an excellent way to keep your home and property safe from intruders and other problems, all while being cheaper and more green than other choices. You also have the choice of mounting your solar motion lamps on a post (this will be provided) or on the side of your house or garage.
If you need just one or many, the solar powered versions of motion lamps are the easiest choice for your lighting needs.

www.sunnybp.com


What has this dribble about "solar motion sensors" got to do with heating WVO with the sun???

Anway, anybody that thinks that "solar" products are environmentally friendly and somehow "save the planet" needs a brain transplant. Either that or join those other idiots like Barrak Osama and Kevin 747 Dudd.
 
Registered: November 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Is there some reason you keep posting the same sort of completely irrelevant and useless comments??

Looking up your posts, all you have been doing is making the same kind of comments over and over which are becoming idiotic through their volume and irrelevancy.



DCS,

Sorry to appear confrontational, but just what is your problem with Stellar ?

He/She appears to have posted just three times since signing on on the 19 march this year.

None of the posts are in any way offensive or abusive.

If you don't like the posts, don't read them.

dva
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Junkman.

I would suggest using metal pipes instead of plastic. The heat transfer is much better.

dva
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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G-day Junkman,

Further to DVA's post above I'd be concerned that your plastic pipes may "melt" if you did receive any significant heat from the sun.

Metal is better (but not copper).

Peter
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: September 11, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've been using solar power to do all of my biodiesel production, WVO heating for settling and also methanol distillation. I still have a rather rough set-up, but it's quite simple. Solar collectors on the roof which heat a 100 gallon water tank. When ready, I circulate the hot water through a plate heat exchanger built into my processor's pumping line. As the WVO passes through, it is rapidly heated to temperature. Startup time is about 10-15 minutes, depending how hot my water is. Usually I run the water when it's about 80-90 deg C and it's about 10 mins to make 95 gallons of veggie 60 degrees, or a little less. I don't have time to count I'm busy doing the titration, trying to beat the heating process haha.




For the methanol recovery, it takes a little more than just stored hot water. Once the temperature of the water equals the temperature of the biodiesel, I throw a few valves on the solar system so that the working fluid in the solar system passes through another plate heat exchanger, instead of heating the water tank. Now the water which circulates through the methanol heat exchanger will be heated directly and all heat from the sun goes right to the biodiesel. Distillation varies based on how bright and shiney the sun is, but with a diaphragm pump in play, getting to 80 deg C and about 10mm vacuum doesn't take long and see all of the methanol is out. I'd say it's about a 30 minute process.



I use plate heat exchangers for both the heating and condensing units. Oh by the way, quick disconnect fittings are used for connecting to either the methanol distiller or biodiesel processor, or the WVO settler, whichever one I'm using.

For any of those who wish to see my disasterous plumbing done on the solar water tank, here it is below. I like to have control and options, so there's a lot of plumbing in there. Anywhere from dishwasher with thermostatic valve to get the perfect 60 deg C water needed for that, to the faucets controlled to perfect hand warm temperatures, to the spouts with no control that we use for mopping the warehouse. The working station for the solar fluid can be seen on the right with that little expansion tank and pump. Collectors are on the roof.



I have 6 collectors on the roof. It's a little overkill for what I'm doing. Here's what they look like anyway.



I didn't heat the WVO directly for 2 reasons. #1 is corrosion and the fact the veggie would be constantly getting heated and take a lot longer. When you store the heat in water, you can rapidly transfer it to the WVO. Also, these things have copper in them, best to avoid contact with it. The 2nd reason is when I'm not making biodiesel, I like to have hot water as well. The plate heat exchangers allow for a perfect transfer from water heat to WVO heat. If I didn't have so many collectors I would probably also add one more loop--- a loop to transfer heat from the really hot biodiesel that I just distilled and transfer that heat onto the WVO which I am about to process next. That would recover at least 50% of the heat. But I have more heat than I'd ever need with these things. Even in cloudy days, I have 90 deg C water in that tank. Technically, the tank should be 400 gallons for the amount of collectors I have, and that assumes all 400 gallons are consumed each day.
 
Registered: July 28, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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