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Balboa inline spa heater element
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Hey Guys,

Has anyone thought about using one of these in the plumbing of their processor:

http://thermproducts.com/usa/w...1/C2XXX-0807-TPS.jpg

Id like to weld one up but might be eaiser to get one out of an old Spa and upgrade the heater element, remove the PVC and weld on a stainless threaded nipple onto each end:

http://www.hoseshop.co.nz/news...nless/welding-nipple

it would be inline, no T's or elbows, less friction loss.

Id like to go ahead and give it a go. can you see any possible issues with this idea before I spend more money..?

Cheers

S
 
Registered: December 03, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Most people use electric hot water heater elements for inline heaters. They're inexpensive and readily available, and the threads match common black iron plumbing fittings, no welding required. All the pieces can be obtained at 'Home depot'.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a welder and some SS tube so id be keen to fabricate it and give it a go. i respect the tried and tested technique using black steel T's and may still end up doing that but I'd like to use or fabricate something similar to the Spa heater. although those Balboa elements are a rip off.

I don't know much about elements, would the cheaper steel one do the job? although I think teflon has good chemical resistance to the chemicals.

steel
http://www.hottubwarehouse.com...r-element-25-4034-bi

teflon
http://www.hottubwarehouse.com...element-25-4034et-bi


Cheers

S
 
Registered: December 03, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That element is likely a high watt density and may not last very long.
When it burns up whats it going to cost you to replace it? Edit I just noticed the prices in your links, they are reasonable. The steel one would be fine, no need for teflon.
A standard low watt density water heater element in iron pipe works great and its cheap and easy to replace the element when it goes.
A flow switch is also needed to to prove flow for the heat to come on, this is important.
I posted my design up on here somewhere before as well as schematics if your interested.
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
That element is likely a high watt density and may not last very long.


Run them on 120V, not 240v and they'll last OK.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
quote:
That element is likely a high watt density and may not last very long.


Run them on 120V, not 240v and they'll last OK.


They will have only 1/4 the heating power.






 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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sticking with the tried and tested method after all that. bought a 2 x 3kw element that has an insert/sleeve for a thermostat. for $109NZD.. i can just wire it so it uses one element. they quoted me $209 for a 240v flow switch tho..!
 
Registered: December 03, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Instead of a flowswitch you can use a pressure switch like these
http://www.zorocanada.com/i/G4...z3LOD5lxyBoC1gHw_wcB
http://www.zorocanada.com/g/Wa...itches/00053661/None
Once the pump is running the pressure switch is activated, and if the pressure drops the switch opens.
They're available with or without a manual reset,



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yeh, you dont want a flow switch rated for the element. You would use a contactor or relay rated for the heater and the flow switch controls the power to the coil of the contactor or relay, SSR etc.
What are you using for temperature control? If you using a PID you could just put the flow switch inline with the SSR control lines.
See my signature for some simple circuit diagrams for doing just that.
I have used one of these for years and it works great, cost about 30 buck CAD:
http://www.dwyer-inst.com/Prod...e/SeriesV10#ordering

Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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