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Automatic fire supression
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How about a picture showing it installed?
 
Location: Cowboy Country | Registered: December 06, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I will get one tomorrow. Its dark out now. Razz
 
Registered: May 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In addition to any automatic units, we should all consider a big "manual" unit. A couple of largish ABC fire extinguishers for sure, but also, a 55 gallon barrel with the top half cut off (for easy shoveling) and filled with cheapo sodium bicarbonate. Put it on wheels and mount a shovel on the side. If you see a fire, you hose it with the "normal" fire extinguisher, but if that doesn't totally kill it, you push the barrel over there and start shoveling.

Baking soda is a very effective fire suppressor in large amounts. Your favorite chem supply house sells it in big 50# bags for dirt cheap. Buy some next week. Keep a tight fitting lid, or just a garbage bag taped over the top to prevent the baking soda from caking and hardening from absorbing moisture.

Another plan would be to have multiple 5 gallon buckets, each half full (for easy throwing/heaving) of baking soda.

Everybody should have multiple layers of protection.

Please carry on.
 
Location: north america somewhere close to the midwest, or not | Registered: May 29, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A couple of largish ABC fire extinguishers for sure,


We should make sure the fire extinguishers are "K" (for cooking oil fires) rated as well.


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Location: Miami, Florida. | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by troy:
In addition to any automatic units, we should all consider a big "manual" unit. A couple of largish ABC fire extinguishers for sure, but also, a 55 gallon barrel with the top half cut off (for easy shoveling) and filled with cheapo sodium bicarbonate. Put it on wheels and mount a shovel on the side. If you see a fire, you hose it with the "normal" fire extinguisher, but if that doesn't totally kill it, you push the barrel over there and start shoveling.

Baking soda is a very effective fire suppressor in large amounts. Your favorite chem supply house sells it in big 50# bags for dirt cheap. Buy some next week. Keep a tight fitting lid, or just a garbage bag taped over the top to prevent the baking soda from caking and hardening from absorbing moisture.

Another plan would be to have multiple 5 gallon buckets, each half full (for easy throwing/heaving) of baking soda.

Everybody should have multiple layers of protection.

Please carry on.


Here's a scary thought. 20 plastic trash bags stapled to the roof over a processor each containing 5-10lb of baking soda. When the fire gets hot enough to melt/stretch the bags, all the baking soda comes raining down.
 
Location: Cowboy Country | Registered: December 06, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rick, Thats very imaginative!
Sorry, I didnt get the pic taken yet, will try tomorrow
 
Registered: May 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Here's a scary thought. 20 plastic trash bags stapled to the roof over a processor each containing 5-10lb of baking soda. When the fire gets hot enough to melt/stretch the bags, all the baking soda comes raining down.


That's very simple and very cleaver! And who doesn't already have about 1000 old plastic grocery bags lying around!

To keep the moisture out, though, you might have to put the baking soda in a Zip-loc bag, then put that bag in the grocery bag that has staples through it. When you really needed the baking soda, you wouldn't want to discover it fell to the floor in one large, unless lump.
 
Location: Southern WI, USA | Registered: May 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I actually had visions of the movie alien. You know with egg pods lining the ceiling, waiting to attack some unsuspecting home brewer. I'm sure there'd be a bunch of reasons why it wouldn't work and you wouldn't know unless you tested it. Personally I don't want to be the guinea pig.
 
Location: Cowboy Country | Registered: December 06, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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you wouldn't know unless you tested it


Sounds like a good excuse to make a YouTube video. And set some crap on fire just to see if it will go out.

My wife is going to Sam's Club today, I'll see if she will buy me a bag of baking soda.
 
Location: Southern WI, USA | Registered: May 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Bags sound good.

You might have to worry about dispersion.

If you double bag it, set it up so the inner bag doesn't fall to the ground with a plop.

Also, be aware that plastic will burn quite well Red Face Mad
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Dont know if this will show or not.
anyway, heres the picture. Kinda junky because it was on my camera phone
 
Registered: May 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here's a scary thought. 20 plastic trash bags stapled to the roof over a processor each containing 5-10lb of baking soda. When the fire gets hot enough to melt/stretch the bags, all the baking soda comes raining down.


This sound similar to the "chimney bombs" that some local fire companies use to combat chimney fires with varying degrees of sucess. Fill a sandwich bag (or 2 or 3) with dry powder and drop down a burning chimney.

The companies that don't use these (like mine) tend to scoff at those who do, but they do knock down the fire on occasion. Seems like this larger version would not hurt anything.

For large quanties of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) visit your local feed mill. I buy it by the pallet, 50lb bags.


-Ian
"Don't complain about farmers with your mouth full."
"Arguing with a government inspector is like wrestling with the pig. You both get dirty but after a while you realize the pig enjoys it".

 
Location: Trapped in a world before later on | Registered: November 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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"This sound similar to the "chimney bombs" that some local fire companies use to combat chimney fires with varying degrees of sucess. Fill a sandwich bag (or 2 or 3) with dry powder and drop down a burning chimney"

Oh.......! I have a wood stove. I'm going to put together an emergency chimney fire kit. Of course, I clean my chimney every year. That's how it goes, the people who are prepared rarely need it and vice versa.



"For large quanties of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) visit your local feed mill. I buy it by the pallet, 50lb bags."

Hey, good source. Why do they carry it???



Finest regards,

troy
 
Location: north america somewhere close to the midwest, or not | Registered: May 29, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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pool supply companies also carry 50 and 100 lb bags. It lowers the ph and total alkalinity
 
Registered: May 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"For large quanties of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) visit your local feed mill. I buy it by the pallet, 50lb bags."

Hey, good source. Why do they carry it???


It is a fairly common feed ingredient for dairy cows. It helps keep the pH of the rumen in line by buffering the acids that are produced by the microbes that begin the digestion process in the rumen. More here.


-Ian
"Don't complain about farmers with your mouth full."
"Arguing with a government inspector is like wrestling with the pig. You both get dirty but after a while you realize the pig enjoys it".

 
Location: Trapped in a world before later on | Registered: November 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by troy:
Oh.......! I have a wood stove. I'm going to put together an emergency chimney fire kit. Of course, I clean my chimney every year. That's how it goes, the people who are prepared rarely need it and vice versa.

It probably isn't a bad idea.

However, if you do a little preparation, I can't imagine the utility.

Make sure chimney clearances are to code (height above roof, space between combustible materials and chimney, and etc).

Also make sure you have a good chimney cap. This will prevent stuff like burning paper from getting out of the chimney (or burning Christmas wrapping paper). If you have a flue fire, you certainly won't want to climb up on the roof, and take off the cap and toss your "bombs" down. Squirt a hose through the holes on the cap if you wish and call the Fire Dept.

I have heard that the first thing to do with a suspected flue fire is to douse your fire with a bucket of water (in your fireplace/stove).

Mom just put a metal roof on her house... I was a bit skeptical at first, but it really isn't too bad. It should last longer than fiberglass composite roofing, and will be much harder to light on fire.

We had planned big 1" hoses around the house. The were great for washing the car, but became a bit of a pain to maintain. But, it still isn't a bad idea to have a hose that will put out a lot of water. Also, I suppose, if you are in the country, make sure your pumphouse circuit isn't through the house.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by hooknline:
Dont know if this will show or not.
anyway, heres the picture. Kinda junky because it was on my camera phone


The can looks awfully high up.
And, from the perspective, quite small.

How much heat does it take to activate it? Flames licking the bottom of it? By that time your shed might be quite involved, and your the can might knock down the fire a bit, but I can't imagine it would put it out. Is it right over your main processor?
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It is high, I havent had time to frame out a lower point to mount it yet(painting interior of my house after work)
It does look smaller than it is in the picture. Its roughly half the size of a propane tank. Heavy as all get out. It was all I could do to lift it and attach the bolts to the bracket that hold it in place. It is right over the main processor, and is set off at 154 degrees from the specs. I do need to lower it, but also dont want it too low.
 
Registered: May 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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