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I remember the electric cars of the 70s were wedge shaped things with a floorpan full of standard automotive lead acid batteries powering DC motors.

Today's electric vehicles...besides having NiCad or whatever batteries, have AC motors.

Why is AC better than DC?

Don't use dead dinos for fuel:
let 'em rest in peace!
 
Registered: June 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I drove a Peugeot Partner electric for almost 4 years. I have never driven such a bag of sh1t in all my life.

When I said I drove it for almost 4 years that was a bit of a white lie. It spent roughly 12 months back at the dealers while they attempted to make it driveable.

In the end I abandoned it in a public car park and told Peugeot they could do what they wanted with it. I haven't seen it since.

We had 5 of them altogether and they all went the same way.

H

http://groups.msn.com/Pinzgauerdiscussiongroup/homepage
 
Location: Lancashire | Registered: December 05, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think it simplifies the control electronics, and I'm sure it makes the motor less expensive.

Regardless of what technology they use, electric cars are still horribly inefficient, unless you're getting the electricicty for free - or from a non-polluting source.

Eric K
 
Location: Saginaw, MI, USA | Registered: January 30, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Posted by Mtushmoo:
quote:
electric cars are still horribly inefficient, unless you're getting the electricicty for free - or from a non-polluting source


The source of the electricity doesn't change the efficiency of the car. Even if the electricity is coming from a "clean" source, the economics of the process still depend on the efficiency.

Keep everything as simple as possible, but no simpler

--Albert Einstein
 
Location: Southington, OH | Registered: January 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We use converted electric milk floats for our collections of household recycling. Each vehicle carries about 2 tonnes in a local round, twice a day. Total cost of electricity for the week is about £5 per vehicle. They are also pretty old, so I'd assume a newer vehicle would be even cheaper to run. Reliability is a problem, but that's down to age...

Jonh
 
Location: Brighton, UK | Registered: November 27, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I disposed of a Peugeot Partner electric van recently. The batteries, which have a 3-5 year lifespan cost £7000 if I remember rightly. Mine were leased, but even so it made the cost of the elctricity used to charge it pale into insignificance.

H

http://groups.msn.com/Pinzgauerdiscussiongroup/homepage
 
Location: Lancashire | Registered: December 05, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I'm converting a TR7 to electric as a commute vehicle. It's daily commute cost works out to just $1.60usd thusly:
Batteries: 14 x $60ea = $840
4 years commuting = 1000 cycles = $0.84/commute
Electricity: 16.8KWH @0.045 = $0.756/commute
Total cost per day = $1.596usd.

I only get to pay half the electricity - my boss has agreed to let me recharge at work. This is also good for the battery pack.
This compares favorably with my present gasoline commute cost ($3.56/day at $1.629/gal x 2.19 gal) or my biodiesel cost ($1.50/day at $0.75/gal x 2.0 gal). I'm lucky enough to live in a hydroelectric generating region with inexpensive electricity. Cost of converting the vehicle has been about the same as rebuilding the engine ($1400). You'd think such regions would have the most electric vehicle use, yet we have NONE. We also grow and export Canola and Sunflower seed to Canada, then import fuel oil from the Alaska north slope. Ain't economics amazing?

Other vehicle operating expenses are assumed on par, though rebuilding the electric "engine" is significantly cheaper. Note also no oil changes and other reduced operating expenses. The batteries are worth $10ea in exchange for new ones, which also helps offset some more of the expense.
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Johno,
How about a few pictures of work in progress ?
regards
dva
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Um, I may change the title if it's too exciting.
I'll be pleased to post some photos of my electric TR7 project. I'll see if I can borrow the digital camera. Some background might be in order:
In the USA, Triumph TR7 coupes are cheap. They're odd and old, and haven't acquired collectors status. They're aerodynamically slippery, handle as well as most modern cars, and parts are amazingly cheap and readily available (from Rimmer Bros, UK). I've bought 5 of them for as little as $100 each. My most expensive one ($1600) has a Volvo B-20 engine and 4-speed tranny, plus the B-1800 electric overdrive, a combination making for a wonderful long distance economy car. This one may become biodiesel powered if I find a suitable engine.
The electric one now has a 60hp (peak) 84 volt Kostov motor, and 400 amp inverter with regenerative braking. Range will be barely 100 miles at modest speed, or more likely 70 miles at realistic commute speed (60+). I have a 32 mile commute distance each way, with one hill near home, but no traffic or other reasons to vary my speed. This is nearly ideal for an electric vehicle commute.
Pictures anon.
Cheers,
JohnO
"Moses Lake isn't the end of the world, but you can see it from here."
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Johno,
Good choice as far as aeroodynamics is concerned. I did some work on a couple of TR7s many years ago. The weak engine did for most of them altho Rover V8 conversions were popular. Funny that the Triumph Stag also suffered from a duff engine.
I see from the tv adverts that Mazda is bringing out a new rotary engine. maybe that will become an ideal car for electric conversion when the engine wears out. You have to admire Mazda for sticking with the rotary, or are they just mad ?
I am waiting for the Diesel version.
regards
dva
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The outfit I've been getting my parts from has an electric RX7 that became famous for repeatedly and very publicly beating the pants off of a Dodge Viper in the 1/4 mile. I can't find the website now, but it's a pretty awesome vehicle. My TR7 won't have the killer controller or battery pack for that kind of performance, but the torque will be better than the stock 2-liter, and 6000rpm limit should turn a few heads anyway. I don't recall what that equates to in 1st or 2nd gear, but it's plenty fast enough for my use.
Cheers,
JohnO
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I can email jpg pictures of the motor installation to anyone interested. The engine compartment looks huge with just the electric motor. TR7's were designed from the beginning for a V-8, so there's lots of room.
My biodiesel/diesel blend was frozen solid this morning at 9degF.
Cheers,
JohnO
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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The Maniac Mazda owned by Eric Wilde at evparts.com?

Neat pics at National Electric Drag Racing Association web site.
http://www.nedra.com/

disclaimer: Not associated with, just an admirer of electric cars. (My dad converted an old renault in the early eighties. Kinda grew up with it. It was put into my head that one must look at and do different things. Hence membership on these boards. ) Smile Smile
 
Location: Lansing, MI | Registered: October 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yup, that's it. Eric sold me the parts for my TR7. He also has an electric Land Rover that is absolutely amazing. It's done the Rubicon.
Cheers,
JohnO
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Johno,
I'd be pleased to have a look at any photos you have . Email me when you have them ready.
Having just broken my nose with a spanner, yes true, I need a little cheering up.
regards
dva, who,looks a bit like a panda at the moment, or should that be a possum.
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Johno,
Got the photos. Thanks.
Doesn't it look empty in that engine compartment ? The simplification of getting to one moving part from the complexity of the original motor is staggering,
More notes on these projects of yours will be most welcome here.
regards
dva
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I haven't started making the battery trays yet. They'll fill "all that space" pretty quickly. 6 in front, 8 in back. I'll still have a little trunk space left, plus the spare tire. TR7's really have generous trunks for a "sports" car.
Cheers,
JohnO
electricTR7

[This message was edited by johno on 13 November 2003 at 06:17 PM.]
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ok guys, take a look at this in The Engineer, 9-15 Jan 2004 edition. www.e4engineering.com
Page 37, Hub Dreams

Also an interesting bit on a new rotory valve set up. Valves in a spin.

Johno,
I note that the power used in this set up adds up to the same as you have in your TR7.
regards
dva

For all you unbelievers that haven't visitedTthe Engineer website I would recomend you do. It has a very good search facility . For instance I have just been there and typed battery into the search facility. It gave back 679 items. not bad. I must dig deeper into this one.
Go on, live dangerously, click on the site.

[This message was edited by dva on 10 January 2004 at 04:29 PM.]
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Saw the rotary valve article.

Sounds just like the Coates rotary valve system.

http://www.coatesengine.com

The image supplies looks like it was lifted off of Coates site!

Masochist to Sadist: "Hurt me."
Sadist to Masochist: "No."
 
Registered: June 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oh, I just saw a blurb about Coates in the same article...never mind Frown

Masochist to Sadist: "Hurt me."
Sadist to Masochist: "No."
 
Registered: June 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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