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Can I use biodiesel in my heater that hasn't been washed or dried?
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Hey Guys I have a question. Can I use just reacted fuel with the glycerin removed in my heater that hasn't been washed or dried? Need to know asap thanks.
 
Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Demeth it (and settle) properly and go for it. Been running a Beckett AFG burner in a boiler for three winters that way.



** Biodiesel Glycerine Soap - The Guide
- on 5 continents helping people make & sell soap from the Biodiesel Glycerine.


 
Location: :-) Great White North eh ? | Registered: December 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ok thanks, will it work in any burner I'm selling some to a friend. Smile It will work in a water heat too right?
 
Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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How about in a new torpedo heater? I can use D2, jet fuel & K1. Or at least a blend, anyone try this yet?

Thanks,
Dave


84 MB 300D Turbo Diesel
98.5 Dodge Cummins 5.9
96 B7100 Kubota
 
Location: leavittsburg,Ohio | Registered: September 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I use 90% bio / 10% D2 blend in my torpedo heater. I just cover half of the air intake.
I have been doing this for 5 years it works great. Every month or 2 you may have to take the nozzle apart to clean it.
 
Location: Central WI | Registered: October 31, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Did you do it with out wash and drying the fuel? I'm just reacting mine.
 
Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I ran unwashed bio in my furnaces for two years. I didn't demeth and they ran hotter and burned out the back of the fire boxes in two out of the three. Repaired them and now I wash and dry just like it was going in my truck. You can probably get away with demeth'ing and settling and be ok.


"This biodiesel tis a cruel and heartless mistress we home brewers have chosen"
 
Location: MA | Registered: February 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I demeth and dry wash just like I would use in my vehicles. Tha cleaner the fuel the fewer problems you will have. Cleaning the nozzle is a 5 minute job, make sure you take the nozzle apart, watch out for small parts. It is nice to have an extra nozzle so you can take your time cleaning it.
 
Location: Central WI | Registered: October 31, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm burning my fuel today and got it to work. ps. you have to adjust the air flow just right and it will work for you. it's going good so far.
 
Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think I might have problems latter on biodiesel that isn't washed it has a high corrosion level what can that effect? and I heard it can eat o rings and rubber gaskets is there a different type I can get
or do I change them a few times a year? and what about the soap? I have notes that the soap burns right up cause it get real hot and goes out the pipe. what dose every one think?
 
Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
I heard it can eat o rings and rubber gaskets is there a different type I can get

yes biodiesel eats 'rubber'. Viton and teflon are biodiesel resistant.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just to clear up a misconception. The word "rubber" has come to be used to describe a number of different materials having similar properties.
Biodiesel will attack Natural rubber. However O rings and gaskets are rarely if ever made from natural rubber because many things attack natural rubber including petroleum products.

Rubber O rings and gaskets are usually made from "synthetic rubber". Synthetic rubber is any type of artificial elastomer, invariably a polymer. An elastomer is a material with the mechanical (or material) property that it can undergo much more elastic deformation under stress than most materials and still return to its previous size without permanent deformation.
Some types of synthetic rubber are attacked by biodiesel and some are not. Experience has shown that viton and teflon elastomers are not affected by biodiesel. Some types of nitrile are affected by biodiesel while other formulations of nitrile are not affected by biodiesel.

I ran biodiesel for three years in a 25 year old diesel car and the 25 year old "rubber" fuel lines were not affected by the biodiesel in that three years period.
On the other hand I have had to replace fuel lines on much newer diesel cars after a year or so because the fuel lines had started to deteriorate.
quote:
Originally posted by Doctor Diesel:
I heard it can eat o rings and rubber gaskets is there a different type I can get
or do I change them a few times a year?
 
Location: here and there | Registered: October 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Okay that's cool what about corrosion?
 
Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If it's dry [<500ppm] what would cause corrosion?



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Maybe the acid is...
 
Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Doctor Diesel:
Maybe the acid is...

What acid? I don't add any acid when I'm making BD, and if anything it's basic not acidic.

If you think your fuel is acidic, place a dull penny in a sample of the fuel and see if it becomes bright in a few days.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That is a very good question.
As you can see, some people are unaware of the different types of corrosion that may be involved when using biodiesel.
For instance, free methanol in your biodiesel can corrode aluminum & zinc which can lead to corrosion of fuel injection equipment.
Free water in the biodiesel can lead to corrosion of fuel injection equipment.
Free glycerine and Mono-& di-glyceride can corrode non-ferrous metals in your injection system.
Free fatty acid provides an electrolyte and hastens the corrosion of zinc in your fuel injection system.
As biodiesel ages formic & acetic acid is formed which can cause corrosion of the fuel system.
Who knows, it might even make your penny all shiny and bright.

quote:
Originally posted by Doctor Diesel:
Okay that's cool what about corrosion?
 
Location: here and there | Registered: October 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks a lot that helps because I'm running it in a oil burner and the fuel is unwashed.
 
Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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