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Winter #3 with my Kuma Stove
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Well, I'm entering the 3rd winter heating my 2500 sq ft house with Bio in my Kuma Arctic oil stove. I'm still lovin it! The stove has more than paid for itself. It's gravity fed and requires no electricity. I avg about 3 gallons per day; 500 gallons per winter.

All the best.


"Talk is cheap because supply usually exceeds demand."
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania | Registered: December 10, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sounds nice!
What model do you have and where did you get it?
Have you had any coking or residue issues?
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jon, I have the Arctic-8. That's the Arctic model with the 8" burner. I do have some coking, and typically shut it down once a week to clean it out. Other than that, it goes 24/7. The dealer I got it from no longer exists.

All the best,


"Talk is cheap because supply usually exceeds demand."
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania | Registered: December 10, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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How hard is it to remove the coking? Big job or small one?

Can you run pure veg oil?

Have you noticed any change in performance between high quality biodiesel and under-reacted fuel?

Wash or no wash?


www.MurphysMachines.Com
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Registered: March 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Murph,

The coking comes out easily with a putty knife. It's a couple minute job.

I have never attempted to run straight veg oil.

I have run under reacted bio, and have see more coking than with quality fuel. Heat output seems the same.

Washed fuel.


"Talk is cheap because supply usually exceeds demand."
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania | Registered: December 10, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sounds like a great stove!

Does it have a decent spot to put a fan on it? Does it get much convection movement to move the heat around.
This may be a great option for when I am too old or lazy to haul, split, stack, lug, etc. firewood...

How do you have yours installed to heat your entire house?

Thanks,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Jon,

I just have a 10" fan blowing against the side of the stove. That seems to do the job. My house is set up pretty well, with the staircase centrally located. The heat flows upstairs without any help from me. When the temps get pretty low outside and we have to crank up the stove, I end up with another fan to help move the heat out of the family room, which can get mighty warm.

The Kuma replaced a pellet stove that I had for 10 years. It was a fireplace insert model. I just placed the Kuma in the mouth of the fireplace and hooked up to the existing exhaust flue. I did cut a vent out the back of the fireplace to use outside air for combustion.

All the best,


"Talk is cheap because supply usually exceeds demand."
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania | Registered: December 10, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sounds good.
My wood stove is in the basement but unfortunately the staircase is at the end of the house.
I use a self powered eco fan on top of the stove and have a slow moving fan at the top of the stairs drawing the warm air up as well as running the furnace fan continually. It works OK but the bedrooms on the other end of the house are never too warm...
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Conspirator, How much did your Kuma set ya back? If ya don't mind me asking.
 
Registered: July 26, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jon, I've seen that type of fan before. Looks cool. I've considered getting one myself. The Kuma has a nice flat top where I could put it.

Blackie, if I remember right... about $1400. That included shipping and the biodiesel carburetor upgrade. I have no idea what they are today. I've saved about $1000 each of the last 2 winters off my utility bill, plus I sold the pellet stove that the Kuma replaced for $500. I'm way ahead of the game.

All the best,


"Talk is cheap because supply usually exceeds demand."
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania | Registered: December 10, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The eco fan is great, my parents have had one for years of trouble free service too. If you already have a fan blowing on your stove though an eco fan will not likely make any difference at all, they have nowhere near the power of a corded electric fan.
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have to wonder what the Kuma "Biodiesel conversion Kit" consists of? I looked at one these kUMA stoves locally (box has printing on side that said "biodiesel conversion kit included) but after the severe coking I experienced with my little Deville stove out in the work shop I am hesistant to get one of these pot style stoves for the house.

anybody know what they do to make them burn Biodiesel better than my Deville.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: March 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Hutch, I bought my Kuma 3 yrs ago and also got the biodiesel carburetor which just has slightly larger orifices for the higher viscosity BD. I'm sure that's all the 'biodiesel conversion kit' is. I have no idea how Deville does it, but my Kuma vaporizes the fuel very well. It has a heavy steel mesh cylinder in the center of the burn pot which glows red hot. The bio burns with a blue flame. I do get some coking, but I only shut it down once a week to clean it out. It's not that bad.

All the best,


"Talk is cheap because supply usually exceeds demand."
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania | Registered: December 10, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That is a very cool picture.


www.MurphysMachines.Com
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Waste Oil Heating - Biodiesel Systems
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Registered: March 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
That is a very cool picture.


Betcha if ya send it to Kuma it gets on their site.



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Location: :-) Great White North eh ? | Registered: December 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Murphy. The steel mesh cylinder actualy has 2 layers. The inner layer is about 2" in diameter and the outer layer about 3.5" in diameter. The burn pot itself is double walled. In the pic you can see a bunch of half inch holes in the inner layer. The combustion air comes into the outer layer and is sucked in thru all those holes. You can see little blue flames reaching out to burn up the oxygen as it enters the burn pot. Its an interesting setup. There's also a de-coking rod that enters the burn pot from the right side at the bottom. I need to work it every other day of so to keep the fuel entry point clear.

Legal Eagle, Kuma used to have a similar pic on their site but now its gone. All the pics of their oil stoves show flames way over the top of the burn pot.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Conspirator,


"Talk is cheap because supply usually exceeds demand."
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania | Registered: December 10, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hutch, my guess is that the biodiesel conversion consists of a carb with a flow valve that allows more bd to flow than the one for fuel oil. At least that is the way the carb I bought from KUMA is set up.
 
Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: September 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi all,

I just picked up one of these Kuma stoves on ebay. It is an Artic AR-8. The thing was filthy with old veg oil or motor oil in the pot which spilled out and coated everything. The carburetor was full of crud. I disassembled everything and scrubbed the carburetor parts in hot soapy water, pressure washed the rest of the stove and pot, rinsed & dried. I made new gaskets to mount the burner pot inside the stove and reassembled everything.

I am heating an old farm milkhouse where I make my biodiesel. It is a 20x12 room with uninsulated concrete walls, concrete floor and minimal insulation in the ceiling. In past years I used a torpedo heater running on biodiesel to keep the room about 50 degrees. But the torpedo heater left an oily film on things and the nozzle required frequent cleaning or replacement. I wanted to try something different this year.

I started out with one of the M-1941 army tent heaters. I actually found a complete one with the matching metal shell and fuel insert. I used it for the past couple of months running my homemade biodiesel. I had to place a light bulb under the carburetor to keep it warm enough so the filter screen wouldn't plug with wax crystals in my cold milkhouse but otherwise it seemed to work alright. It did "run away" a couple of times producing lots of soot & smoke with areas on the top of the stove starting to glow orange but I had cut a slot next to the lower air intake door for the carburetor line to exit and this allowed me to close the lower door and cut off the air intake to slow things down. I'm not sure what caused this - it was early in my learning curve and I may have just turned the carb up too high and the pool of fuel in the pot didn't ignite right away. Otherwise, it was fairly easy to run the stove with no smoke from the chimney. The flame was most always yellow and it seemed to use quite a bit of fuel for the amount of heat it gave off. Throttled back, this stove would keep the old milkhouse at about 45-55 degrees. But it seemed inefficient and I wanted something better. And then out of nowhere was this Kuma Artic on ebay. I thought it was worth a try.

This weekend I shut down the M-1941 stove, pulled it out and installed the Kuma. I had cut some holes in the plate under the carburetor so I could warm the carburetor with a light bulb like I had been doing with the M-1941. A splash of methanol in the pot, a shot from the propane torch and away we go. I waited for the methanol to get the draft going and burn off while advancing the fuel knob about halfway. Soon I had a beautiful blue flame like in Conspirator's picture. A short video from BioLyle is on youtube here : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKo7MfZA43E although BioLyle has his catalyst in upside-down. (Conspirator also has his burn ring installed in the wrong place in the picture) This stove is amazing! On it's lowest setting I am keeping the temperature in my old milkhouse at around 60 degrees and using less fuel than the M-1941 heater. The beautiful blue flame with the blue spears dancing in and out around the catalyst is almost hypnotic to watch. It burns cleanly and efficiently and is fun to watch too! I don't know what the differences are between the Kuma and other stoves that burn biodiesel but the Kuma works very nicely!
 
Registered: April 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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open flame in biodiesel refinery would make me nervous....



 
Registered: April 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It's not an open flame. It's within a closed stove. Conspirator's picture is through the glass on the front door.
 
Registered: April 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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