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Alaska boiler/stove idea?
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Cheers for the advice Smile

Just out of interest, how hot does wood/paper burn at in a stove?
 
Registered: October 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There is no way of knowing what the flue temp is with wood or paper in any given stove. It may be cool or very hot. It depends on factors such as dryness of fuel, amount of fuel, strength of draft,design of stove, design of flue etc. The flue material must be able to cope with the highest possible temp, hence the very high specifications for solid fuel burners.
An oil burner on the other hand produces a very predictable and consistent flue temperature so the spec required of the material is much lower.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Cheers, it's all becoming much clearer Smile

Now I have to decide whether it's worth spending the extra money on the flue in order to burn solid fuels. I'm looking at this project long term, even being able to take this if/when I move house so trying to plan ahead Wink
 
Registered: October 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Viay, are you burning WVO/HHO blend? If so, and you live in the U.K. a Harmony 2 stove complete with boiler and vapour pot burner needs no modification to burn the above blend. The stoves are readily available on ebay at around £150. My installation runs 9 radiators and will run for 5/6days before cleaning which is a 30 min. job.
 
Location: Spain | Registered: March 03, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Espana1,

At the moment I'm just using my standard gas boiler. I've been collecting WVO and making bio for the car for a few months now and following the other thread about using Alaka heaters to heat a home and thought it was time to look into making my own.

I assume HHO is home heating oil? I was basically looking at burning WVO and possibly paper logs (and the odd bit of timber I need to get rid of). Can a harmony stove burn 100% waste veg oil?

Thanks

Vijay
 
Registered: October 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There are lots of people in the same situation as you. When making biodiesel from wvo the yellow grease quickly builds up and it makes sense to make use of it rather than having to dispose of it.
I have been running my burner/boiler every day 14 hours a day for 2 months and I am well pleased with it. It involves about 10 minutes work every morning to clean and light it and after that it works without any further adjustment. Our house has never been so warm.
We consume 12 litres of yellow grease and one litre of biodiesel( startup)each day.
However using it these last few months has given me some ideas on how to improve it and make it easier to operate. I am proposing to make another one and would like to post each stage of the construction on this forum over a couple of weeks. Would you mind if I post it here rather than start a new thread?
If any one wants to build a burner/boiler of this design they are going to need an Alaska burner which are still available from James Auberry on Ebay at a bargain price even after paying shipping across the Atlantic.
Also you will need 2 steel 45 gallon oil drums, an empty calor/ kosangas type 34Kg gas bottle and an 8X4 feet sheet of 24 guage sheet metal. Stainless steel would be best but will be expensive. Galvanized steel is much cheaper but will not last as long. Most of the work is sheet metal work which can be done by hand tools but there is some welding involved, either arc or mig.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Don’t know about anybody else but I am all eyes Eek
I am fascinated by this tread; while I get rid of my yellow grease and glycerol using a wood gas boiler; this is rather by necessity than design;
kosangas type 34Kg gas bottle cut the end off and it will fit just inside the ring of the Alaska burner; the lager size gas bottle don’t know the size will just fit over the Alaska burner.
Déise I can see your mind working Cool bet this will be something to see; post away with as many diagrams as possible' it will be of immense interest especially at these harsh times; hurlers on strike and all Mad Mad


If it’s not broken don’t fix it if you do you’ll break it.

The black dog can be beaten
 
Location: peoples republic of cork ireland | Registered: November 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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All eyes here.
 
Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: September 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Looking forward to new ideas too Smile
 
Registered: October 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For anyone who's built a boiler using an Alaska burner, I just wondered how much control you have managed to get of the flame/burn temperature?

Vijay
 
Registered: October 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sorry about the delay in getting started, I had to go do some real work for a couple of days.

So here is a picture of the first stage of the burner/ boiler. It is a steel oildrum cut at 23 inches long. That just happens to be along the rib. The opening at the front is 13 inches wide and 16 inches high. Just comfortable for getting the burner in and out for cleaning lighting etc.
The burner is two and a half inches from the front of the drum.
In my first boiler the base was an open angle iron frame. While this gave easy access it proved to be a problem when the wind was gusting during start up. Little puffs of smoke would escape from the burner and rise up immediately from the open frame.
This design should correct that fault.
The burner is installed using a simple bayonet mount which I posted earlier on Military heaters on Ebay. However several people said the images were too small so I will post the details here in a larger format.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Imake, does the container of what looks like fuel have any function or just in the picture? I cut mine on the rib also, adds a bit of stiffness.
 
Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: September 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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No Raften. The container is just supporting the burner temporarily for the picture. When cutting out the hole for the burner be as accurate as you can. I cut mine undersized and then file out the hole until the burner slides in smoothly.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sorry Veejay, I missed your question. The Alaska burner is very controllable. Once you have figured out the range for your particular fuel, the control on the carb will adjust between a low heat up to a very hot flame. For instance with biodiesel a low setting would be 2 and a high setting will be 6. It will be different for other fuels.
However you need to be aware that adjustment happens very slowly. If you change the setting on the knob there will be no change in the flame for about 15 minutes.
With the peristaltic dosing pump its much the same.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was actually hoping for a more automated system. I'm sure I read somewhere that by using a peristaltic dosing pump and various temp sensors, that the flow of fuel was able to be be more controlled.
 
Registered: October 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I use thermostats attached to the flue to limit the highest and lowest temperature. If someone was to accidentally turn up the pump control too high the stat on the flue will sense the high temp and switch the pump off until the temp goes down to a safe level. If there was a power cut and the fire went out the lower stat would prevent the pump coming back on and flooding the burner with oil.
These make a big difference to the safety of running this type of burner.
I fitted the bayonet mounting today. I began by marking a pencil line rught round the outside of the burner 2 and a quarter inches from the top edge. I made 3 equidistant marks on this line. I drilled at these points and fitted a 40mm M6 nut and bolt. So now I had e bolts sticking out at 60 degrees to each other.
These are the pins of the bayonet mount.
The bracket is shown below. I made mine from 1.5 inch aluminium angle but steel would be fine.
Turn the boiler base upside down, fit the burner and install the brackets in the correct position. Mark and drill the boiler base and bolt the brackets in place. Turn it right way up adf try fitting the burner. It should lock into place with a turn of about 2 inches.
I hope this all makes sense.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi,

You're obviously a busy man but when you have five minutes, could you give a bit more detail of what sensors you used and how you wired them all up to contol the fuel?

Cheers

Vijay
 
Registered: October 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Easily done. Go to RS components website and look up industrial thermostats. They are really cheap and totally reliable, about 3 GBP each. The ones I used are code nos.331-534 for the upper limiter and 331-556 for the lower limiter.They are wired in series with the pump itself. My pump is 12v from a transformer but these thermostats will handle 240 v if needed.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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The next stage in the construction of the burner/boiler is to make a drip tray. This is very important and should not be omitted. I made mine from 24 guage galvanised steel. Its an open top box 13" by 24" by 4" deep. This lies on the floor directly under the burner. The original equipment supplied with the Alaska burner includes a hose to connect to the overflow so that any excess fuel is carried away from the burner, preferably out of the building. This is the best and safest way to deal with any overflow, but the drip tray is a good bit of insurance..
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So are you till using the oringinal carb/flow control unit that comes with the Alaska?

Vijay
 
Registered: October 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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