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Boiler advice for a newbie
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We just found a supplier of B100 and intend to switch from the B5 we have been using. As it turns out, our tank and fuel line needed to be replaced anyway, so we will be starting the pure biodiesel with new equipment in that regard. Other than that, we have a pretty typical Burnham oil furnace. I am not technical and our furnace technician, though competent, doesn't have experience with biodiesel. He will be changing out oil gaskets for ones that will not degrade. But I have read widely varying accounts of whether and how the nozzle or fuel pressure need to be adjusted.

Can anyone explain to me the basic principles or reasons behind why the nozzle and/or fuel pressure might need to be adjusted, how I will know if they need to be adjusted, and how involved (or expensive) it is for me to get them adjusted?

Thanks in advance for any help.
 
Registered: August 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Is your oil tank inside? B100 will freeze and or burn inconsistently if your tank is outside.
I installed a new Biasi boiler in my home this spring that I run on B100.
I used black iron pipe for the fuel feed line to the filter head which I mounted on the boiler, I used a standard flexible braided oil line from the filter head to the burner to make it easy to service the burner. The problem with the standard copper feed lines is that they corrode in biodiesel. I wouldn't worry about the small copper lines inside the burner itself as they can be easily replaced if needed.
B100 has a different viscosity and contains more oxygen then standard fuel oil and therefore does not atomize nor burn the same. It requires a higher pressure and less air then dino fuel.
I recommend an 80 degree nozzle for easier starts with B100 and a pressure of at least 100 psi. The Riello burner on my new boiler is stock at 190PSI and only required minor tinkering to get the CO at the right levels. You need to cut the air supply way down compared to standard fuel oil too.
Your technician should have no trouble setting it up with his standard combustion/smoke analyzer, it just takes some tinkering with the pressure/air adjustments to get it right, all in all the setup procedure is no different then with standard fuel oil.
HTH!
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the help. My tank is inside, and the basement never gets down below 50 degrees (and usually stays fairly well north of that). I will ask the technician to use something other than copper for the new fuel line. I understand the need for the higher pressure required due to the different viscosity. Can you please help me understand why the 80-degree nozzle is important? Also, I have read in some places that some people have trouble with their combustion sensors because of the cleaner burn. Is there anything I need to tell the technician about that?

Thanks again.
 
Registered: August 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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your tech will need to cut back on the combustion air, for my burner the air is almost totally closed.


" I don't know what I don't know until I know"
1994 GMC 6.5 Tubo 2005 Dodge ram 3500, 3 VW's 2000, 2002, 2005.
 
Location: Manitoba Canada | Registered: March 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Can you please help me understand why the 80-degree nozzle is important?

I am not sure of the technical details, I do know that it makes for more consistent cold starts with no puffing. I suspect the steeper angle allows for better combustion of the cold bio? My new boiler ran and started fine on the stock 70 degree nozzle but it would puff and run rough from a cold start for the first 5 minutes or so, switching it to an 80 removed all puffing and rough running.
I have had zero issues with flame sensors on my 2 riello burners nor the aero burner on my processor boiler in over 5 years (combined) of use.
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've been running B100 for a couple of heating seasons now. I had to spray the inside of the burner tube with heat resistant silver paint to help the senor to detect the flame properly. Other than that, I dropped the nozzle from a 1.00 gal down to a .75 gal and increased the pressure from 80 psi to 150 psi and cut the air way back. I installed a pressure gauge permantly on the burner, marked the air settings and made sure I had extras nozzles in case I ran out of bio and had to go back to dino for a while.

Since I've been running B100, I don't cringe everytime the furnace kicks on during the winter. lol.

Good luck.


"This biodiesel tis a cruel and heartless mistress we home brewers have chosen"
 
Location: MA | Registered: February 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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