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Reliable 1/2 G/H commercial babington burner unit used by U.S. military
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This is an extension from the "heating WVO with WVO' discussion (HERE), we were highacking that discussion so I started this one, This specific babington unit discussion starts here on page 11.

The U.S. military is now required to run EVERYTHING on JP-8 jet fuel, from airplanes to food heaters, due to this they are switching away from the gasoline burning M-2 kitchen food heater to what appears to now be called the "MBU" unit, it uses a small 1/2 G/H babington style burner.

The following links indicate this burner has been used for over 6 years in the field with NO serious accidents. The burner is small and reliable and apparently has been used to heat homes in Europe since the late 1980"s, sure sounds interesting to me.

General MBU deployment info article.

Army babington burner.

Airtronic babington burner.

airtronic home page.

121 page PDF, pages 24 through 37 is info about the testing of 10 airtronic babington heaters used to heat homes over a winter.
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You can finally find some of the babington burner units (MBUs) as surplus:
here
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM | Registered: July 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by cstoker:
You can finally find some of the babington burner units (MBUs) as surplus:
here


Is the Ebay unit a Babbington? Is it made by Airtronics? It looks very different then the ones here:

http://babingtontechnology.com/
 
Registered: May 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oops, I think the MBU is probably using a siphon nozzle, upon wading through some of the 344 page manual.
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM | Registered: July 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by cstoker:
Oops, I think the MBU is probably using a siphon nozzle, upon wading through some of the 344 page manual.


Do you have a hard copy or an online manual? If online, can you provide a link? thx
 
Registered: May 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The pdf manual I found is here.
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM | Registered: July 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I worked for Babington technologies for several years. The MBU does NOT USE A BABINGTON BURNER. The MBU is the result of the Army's failed attempt to replace the gasoline powered M2 burner, which was used primarily in the M59 field cooking range. The MBU uses an unreliable, dirty, and noisy siphon feed burner which is incapable of running on anything other than JP8 (kerosene). The Airtronic (Babington) burner is used in the Marine Corp. TRHS and has enjoyed successful use and deployment w/ the Marines Since 1995. The same burner can be used to also power many other appliances including the M59 range. This is a versatile burner that can run on many distillate fuels even with modest amounts of water and contaminates in the fuel.
 
Registered: February 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Welcome aboard Gary! Are Airtronic Babington home heaters available in the US? If so, what are the brand names?
 
Registered: May 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Welcome Gary, please contribute any info you might have, so far you are the best, and only, possible source for more than the companies advertising info on the Airtronic burners, they have not responded to direct email enquieries.

In the first post in this discussion I linked to a 121 page document refering to some independant Airtronic testing, this was a research summery from 2003 that was posted on the websit for the "National oilheat research aliance", the link no longer works but the mainpage for the NORA is HERE, nora-oilheat.org, the original document link was -- http://nora-oilheat.org/PDF/OilheatSymposium2003c.pdf, it may still be in there archives someplace, I will do a bit of searching for it.
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Tim c cook:
Welcome Gary, please contribute any info you might have, so far you are the best, and only, possible source for more than the companies advertising info on the Airtronic burners, they have not responded to direct email enquieries.

In the first post in this discussion I linked to a 121 page document refering to some independant Airtronic testing, this was a research summery from 2003 that was posted on the websit for the "National oilheat research aliance", the link no longer works but the mainpage for the NORA is HERE, nora-oilheat.org, the original document link was -- http://nora-oilheat.org/PDF/OilheatSymposium2003c.pdf, it may still be in there archives someplace, I will do a bit of searching for it.


I can be reached at gary@sippin.com if you need info on Babington tech
 
Registered: February 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Gary Sippin:
...I can be reached at gary@sippin.com if you need info on Babington tech
too bad that Sippin.com does not sell any babington type products.


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Location: North Tx | Registered: November 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My work with Babington in the past involved only military applications, and at the moment the Babington Airtronic Burner is only used for their Field feeding systems. We did test the burners for several years in home heating applications where they still may have a future. The Babington group is still focused on military applications because they make the burner and all the cooking appliances as well. I will say the burner is quite an amazing piece of technology. Running virtually any type of fuel, this oil burner operates with virtually no smoke or odor (the military regularly runs these burners indoors and unvented). In addition, it has a variable firing rate which can be adjusted to as low as .25 per gallon, and up to over 1 gallon per hour. Because the burner technology utilizes its own combustion chamber, it is generally insensitive to the type of heat exchanger it is introduced to. We tested the burner in a variety boilers, furnaces, and how water heaters. In all applications burner performed flawlessly. Running in an energykinetics system 2000, we obtained a 90% efficiency rating without a serious condensation problem. In doing so our burners were operating at CO2 levels in excess of 14.5%, with carbon monoxide levels less than 5 ppm. Because the burner technology does not use a conventional hydraulic nozzle, ii is insensitive to fuel contaminants. In some test scenarios we used #200 screen strainers instead of the typical 20 to 30 µ fuel filter used for conventional home heating. Those burners never clogged or malfunction under any circumstances. What's even more exciting about the burner is that I know of several that have operated in furnaces for as long as 10 years and he exchangers are as clean today as they were 10 years ago (with the exception of a minor amount of iron sulfate). With the introduction of low sulfur disstilate fuels, a Babington burner should be able to run as clean as natural gas. The burners and all of the military apparatus are now being manufactured in the United States. In the past most of the manufacturing was done in Europe. This should lead to lower manufacturing costs, and eventually result in this technology becoming commercialized for residential home heating applications. You can view additional information on Babington military equipment on their website at www.babingtontechnology.com
 
Registered: February 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Originally posted by Gary Sippin:...at the moment the Babington Airtronic Burner is only used for their Field feeding systems...[/URL]
What would we keep our eyes open for in surplus military stuff that would have a babington burner in it? A particular stove model number orrr product classification orr??


_________________________
If you believe you can't YOUR RIGHT;

But equally so.... if you believe you can, YOUR RIGHT as well.
 
Location: North Tx | Registered: November 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I built a murphy burner, it is pretty similar, it vaporizes oil with air into a cloud, it burns pretty clean and makes a lot of heat, anybody know what the width of the slot in the babington nozzel is?
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by fabricator:
...anybody know what the width of the slot in the babington nozzel is?
from my reading it matters the size of the ball. Larger balls-larger holes.

The ones they sell (door nobish in size) has a 0.01" hole.

There are now two places you can buy premade babington balls with the micro hole(s) and air inlet with npt threads. Price range from 35 to 50 before shipping.

One of the places is the one I linked to in here that now makes Babington burners you can buy off the shelf.

quote:
From: yahoo altfuelbabington
I have a large quantity of precision babington balls available on my
website. These are 3 inch diameter steel balls, 14 gauge, each with
1/4" NPT inlets and three (3) 0.010 babington outlets on the opposite
sides. They can be purchased through my website.

www.YellowBiodiesel.net


Tom Leue


Homestead Inc.
www.YellowBiodiesel.net


Recent poster at Altfuelbabington had some success using 1/2 a ball. (kitchen ladel)

http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=VtP2uMo868Q


_________________________
If you believe you can't YOUR RIGHT;

But equally so.... if you believe you can, YOUR RIGHT as well.
 
Location: North Tx | Registered: November 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Wow that youtube vid is a pretty nasty burn compared to the murphy type burner, mine burns with a stable light yellow to blue at the base.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fabricator:
Wow that youtube vid is a pretty nasty burn compared to the murphy type burner, mine burns with a stable light yellow to blue at the base.
yes but it was a crude test to see if a 1/2 ball would even work. Question is tweaked with improvements can you get it to burn as well as a typical Babington or not?

Besides... Im sure any heater, turk, Babington, Drip etc. will have to be encased so air etc. can all be controlled before tuning to a blue flame is even possible.


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If you believe you can't YOUR RIGHT;

But equally so.... if you believe you can, YOUR RIGHT as well.
 
Location: North Tx | Registered: November 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Babington burner as two atomizer's with laser cut slots. I don't recall the exact dimensions but they are so small that they cannot be effectively cut by mechanical means. The size of the ball does not determine the firing rate, it is primarily the size of the slot, and air pressure being introduced. The standard Babington burner has 2 atomizer's that have a spray that converges at about a 17° angle. This is sprayed into a flame tube that introduces primary and secondary air to provide complete combustion.

Also, I am referring to an actual Babington burner, not a homemade device. A real Babington burner uses a variety of technologies to achieve clean combustion. This includes a design engineered combustion chamber, fuel delivery system, and high static pressure blower, etc. The burner was also designed to run at extreme low capacity. Adopting the technology for use with high viscosity fuels has always been an intriguing idea, however the babington technology is really the only technology that can run reliably at low capacities of under 1/2 gallon per hour, so that has been the focus of the developer.

As far as the Babington atomizer is concerned, the fuel flows over it and creates a thin film due to the surface tension. Even on a very small atomizer the amount of fuel flowing over the atomizer is many times greater than the amount that is actually used to burn. I suppose if a very large firing rate burner were to be made, using a high viscosity fuel a larger atomizer should be employed.
 
Registered: February 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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The Marine Corps TRHS tray ration heating system, is the only device using the Babington burner in current military inventory, I have no idea if the old ones are sold as surplus.


quote:
Originally posted by jeepin, moggin Jessup (coachgeo):
quote:
Originally posted by Gary Sippin:...at the moment the Babington Airtronic Burner is only used for their Field feeding systems...[/URL]
What would we keep our eyes open for in surplus military stuff that would have a babington burner in it? A particular stove model number orrr product classification orr??
 
Registered: February 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This has me wondering now, what if you were to take a channel with maybe 1/2 inch sides and 1/2 inch bottom and then roll it into an arc, like a piece of pipe cut in half then, at the center of the arc drill a very small hole in the center of the channel, drip oil onto the channel and it would behave a lot like a section of a ball.
I have a burner that burns wvo extremely efficiently, it runs in my pole barn to heat my bio process and there is no exaust it makes very little smoke, it has a nozzel that sits oe or two thousandths of an inch below the surface of a pool of oil, turn on the air to the nozzel and you get a very fine cloud of oil, then light the cloud and it burns very clean and hot, it will heat 250 gallons of wvo through a heat exchanger to 130 degrees in about an hour.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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