BIODIESEL & SVO DISCUSSION FORUMS





Sponsors    Biodiesel and SVO Forums Home    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Biodiesel  Hop To Forums  Dewatering/Drying Washed Biodiesel    bubble and fan drying works fast and cheap

Moderators: Shaun, The Trouts
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
bubble and fan drying works fast and cheap
 Login/Join
 
Member
posted
after washing my biodiesel with a nozzle and water I transfer it to a 80ltr drum.
Then I use a fish tank pump with two hoses with bubble rocks on the end and turn the air pump on.
At the same time I use a cooling fan to blow over the tank pointing down a bit to blow the diesel dry
I have shined a 1w led torch (very intense beam )into the biodiesel and I cannot see the bottom of the drum when I start this but after 4 hours or so depending on the outside temperature 20c at the moment I can see the biodiesel is clear as a bell DRY AND READY TO SLIP IN MY TANK

Hope this helps as its cheap to do as the air pump is only 5w and the fan is 35w.
better still run it off my solar generating system.


The best things in life are FREE well nearly
I build Solar Trackers and Wind Turbines
 
Location: Norwich United Kingdom | Registered: August 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Do you run a frige test? I have seen bd that was nice and bright and clear turn cloudy overnignt in the frige. When I tested it with the Imanometer it had a very high water content yet after sitting at room temp over night it was back to clear and bright. Add some heat to your system and you should dry fine.
 
Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: September 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
the first batch I made I kept a small amount in a bottle in my van to see if it went hazy during the night as temps fell and sure it went hazy but cleared as it got warmer
but my new batch stays cristle day or night this time
will stick the bottle in my fridge which is 4c and see if its OK think it will pass the test pretty sure this batch is fine.
been reading loads of good advice on forums on Greydon blairs .


The best things in life are FREE well nearly
I build Solar Trackers and Wind Turbines
 
Location: Norwich United Kingdom | Registered: August 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Don't know what motor you are running this fuel in but you aren't doing it any good by putting that water in there. At the least if you have a steel tank you are going to have it rust thru at some time.
 
Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: September 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Good point. The fridge test is by no means conclusive evidence of dry fuel. At best it's an indication that the fuel is not excessively wet. A vapor test or hot pan test is better.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
The frige test is pretty good but you need to keep the bd in overnight to be a good test. A few hours may not be long enough. I will say that every time I have tested fuel with the Imanometer test it shows fuel that has passed frige to be very dry fuel.
 
Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: September 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



Member
posted Hide Post
I have no doubt that very dry fuel passes the fridge test, and wet fuel won't. The important question is: what's the ppm H2O of fuel that just starts to show haze at 36°F? The HPT shows H2O greater than 500ppm, the generally accepted level of allowable moisture content, that's what makes it a better test.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
John I don't keep up on HPT info and am sure I wouldn't do it correctly. I'll bet a lot of folks would benefit from your posting of a procedure standard. My frige pass fuel has been below 200 ppm in the past but I have messed with my Imanometer and need to calibrate it again.
 
Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: September 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Here's a link to a number of moisture tests, including the HPT. My qualitative preference is the quick and easy vapor test.
http://www.burnveg.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=72
I agree that you are producing dry BD fuel, especially since you've confirmed it with a carbide test. [calling it a manometer test is a misnomer, the carbide is the active test reagent. One could also call it a magnahelic test and be equally misleading]
My point is that the 'fridge test' indicates that there is less than 1000 ppm moisture, and that's simply not adequate for 'dry' fuel. Until someone can calibrate the threshold of the fridge test with an instrument of recognized accuracy like the SandyBrae, then what it's actually showing is open to conjecture.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I think its a good idea to correlate the fridge test with the results of a more accurate test such as W/H/W or the carbide manometer. That way the home brewer has a quick and easy test that he can have confidence in.
However I think it would be a mistake to post the results on this forum because there will always be people who will think that it would apply in every situation. Variations in the feedstock, fridge temperature, pho content, animal fat content , conversion rate, soap content etc. will affect the outcome of the fridge test.
Posting a result could easily lead to people using wet fuel that they think is dry.
which is not exactly the objective of this forum.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Good point about not posting the results, too many things consider.
 
Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: September 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Hmmm... I pop in here every so often. I thought (it used to be) if you had very clear fuel it was dry. The old if you can read the label through the jar test. Now, that is not the case?
I bubble dry 12 hours (min), and look into the top of my cone bottom washing/ dry tank. When I can see the bottom just sweet I thought it was dry..?? No??
Thanks
Wags

BTW, I am in no hurry to process. I don't use enough. I usually take a week to make a batch. 1 night to process, 3 or 4 mist wash/ bubble wash, then dry a couple nights.
 
Location: waterloo, il | Registered: July 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post



Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
I thought (it used to be) if you had very clear fuel it was dry.

http://www.make-biodiesel.org/...for-water-in-vo.html



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
quote:
I thought (it used to be) if you had very clear fuel it was dry.

http://www.make-biodiesel.org/...for-water-in-vo.html

Whew, there is a lot going on there.
I'm not trying to be argumentative... just want to know. Why are the 500, 1000, 2000 ppm standards set. I see the ASTM?? set the one standard, but is there any reason to believe 1000, or 2000 ppm will hurt stuff?
And... will this water come out of the fuel in the truck water separator? Or another water separator/ filter?
Thanks
Wags
 
Location: waterloo, il | Registered: July 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
will this water come out of the fuel in the truck water separator? Or another water separator/ filter?

No.
Water separators and Water block filters only remove bulk water not dissolved or suspended water.

Wet fuel damages fuel system components. That's well documented. use the search function.

Use only dry fuel for engine longevity and reliability.

You only know it's dry if you test it for water.

quote:
Why are the 500, 1000, 2000 ppm standards set.
500 ppm is generally considered 'dry enough' for most BD. I don't know of any 1000, 2000 ppm standards set.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I figured the filter would not remove suspended water, but I was hoping.
So, the green can thing is expensive. How reliable is it? Are the hot spoon methods ok, orjujst not accurate enough?
IE, the 3/27 test was a pretty simple cheap way to detemrine conversion. What is the (or is there) a cheap, RELIABLE method for testing or water?
Thanks
Steve
 
Location: waterloo, il | Registered: July 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
OK, so producing a vacuum will make water boil at a lower temp, right? How many degrees per inches of vacuum?
Wags

This message has been edited. Last edited by: wagspe208,
 
Location: waterloo, il | Registered: July 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Reply

Most of the easy visual tests, hot spoon, fridge test etc dont tell you anything very definite. Depending on several factors they will tell you if there is more than 1000ppm of water in a sample.
If you want more accurate information you will have to use a more sophisticated method, weigh/heat weigh, carbide manometer or sandy brae tester.
The advantage of these tests is that they will tell you whether your sample is below 500ppm which is the max limit for engine fuel. This limit exists for a good reason, water is the most destructive contaminant in fuel and there are those that would argue, me included, that it is too high.
The 500ppm threshold was simply inherited from the previous standard for petrodiesel. Biodiesel is much more hygroscopic than petrodiesel and in countries with high humidities such as mine a limit of 200 would make more sense.
The carbide manometer costs about 40-50 dollars to put together including reagent for up to 100 tests.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



  Powered by Social Strata  
 

Sponsors    Biodiesel and SVO Forums Home    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Biodiesel  Hop To Forums  Dewatering/Drying Washed Biodiesel    bubble and fan drying works fast and cheap

© Maui Green Energy 2000 - 2014