BIODIESEL & SVO DISCUSSION FORUMS






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This message has been edited. Last edited by: Neurot,
 
Location: Austin, TX | Registered: September 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jason,

FWIW, I think it's cool that you post stuff like this here.


Kumar Plocher
Yokayo Biofuels
Yokayo Biofuels Facebook page
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fueling / R \ evolution since 2001
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Sustainable Biodiesel...
 
Location: Ukiah, CA USA | Registered: September 19, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Which begs the question, what sort of equipment is burning the glycerin as fuel? I have built several glycerin burners, and only the last of them was successful. I believe this stuff will not burn in any conventional burning equipment. Do you have customers for this goo or is this theoretical?

My successful glycerin burner has 2-1/2 tons of masonry, including firebrick inner chamber and sand and circulating pipes to extract the heat. It is started with Yellow Heat burner, and only adds the glycerin as a secondary fuel. Its really hot and clean burning, but it takes a lot to get it started.

My Yellow Heat burner cleanly combusts unfiltered and unheated vegetable oil, but it will not handle glycerin, AFAIK. See more about Yellow Heat at http://drop.io/wvuv5vc_YellowHeat. If you want to buy one, it is for sale at http://westernmass.craigslist.org/tls/979854222.html or from Homestead.

Tom Leue
 
Location: Ashfield, MA USA | Registered: March 21, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Homestead Inc.:
Which begs the question, what sort of equipment is burning the glycerin as fuel? I have built several glycerin burners, and only the last of them was successful. I believe this stuff will not burn in any conventional burning equipment. Do you have customers for this goo or is this theoretical?

My successful glycerin burner has 2-1/2 tons of masonry, including firebrick inner chamber and sand and circulating pipes to extract the heat. It is started with Yellow Heat burner, and only adds the glycerin as a secondary fuel. Its really hot and clean burning, but it takes a lot to get it started.

My Yellow Heat burner cleanly combusts unfiltered and unheated vegetable oil, but it will not handle glycerin, AFAIK. See more about Yellow Heat at http://drop.io/wvuv5vc_YellowHeat. If you want to buy one, it is for sale at http://westernmass.craigslist.org/tls/979854222.html or from Homestead.

Tom Leue


Does that heater require an air compressor?
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hello folks!

I am new to the forum, and I would like to respond to the burning glycerin question.

Our company has developed a fully automatic crude glycerin burner that works great! Please check our website, www.alterHeat.com, and click the MK Glycerin Burner tab.

We are in the Cleveland area if anyone wants to see the burnar in operation! Bring your glycerin!

Rick Krystowski
AlterHeat.com
rkryst@verizon.net
 
Location: Ohio | Registered: January 28, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sorry!

Try the link without the comma!
www.AlterHeat.com

Rick Krystowski
 
Location: Ohio | Registered: January 28, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Welcome to the board, what do they cost?
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Rick Krystowski:
Sorry!

Try the link without the comma!
www.AlterHeat.com

Rick Krystowski
Very interesting. Can you give an idea of cost and processing necessary to use raw glycerol byproduct as fuel?


'05 CRD B100
'01 TDi B100

 
Location: Colorado | Registered: March 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hello!

The price of the MK Glycerin Burner is similar to the higher end waste oil burners. We are a very small company, and are trying to keep costs down, but patent expenses are very high. Please call me for a more exact price.

We are on our second heating season using the glycerin burner and it works great. We are firing it at about 250,000 BTU/hr. The glycerin needs no further processing or refining- as it comes from the biodiesel producer is fine. (I don't know much about biodiesel production, but I sure can burn the glycerin!) The only spec for the glycedrin is that the viscosity should be higher than 220 centistokes at 70 degrees F. (20 wt oil), and a water content no higher than 20%.

The great thing is glycerin now is the newest biofuel, and when used as an alternative heating fuel (via our burner) it is eligible for the $.50 tax credit.

I have tried to put most of the info on AlterHeat.com but contact me for more specifics.

Regards, Rick
 
Location: Ohio | Registered: January 28, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Rick Krystowski:
Hello!

The price of the MK Glycerin Burner is similar to the higher end waste oil burners. We are a very small company, and are trying to keep costs down, but patent expenses are very high. Please call me for a more exact price.

We are on our second heating season using the glycerin burner and it works great. We are firing it at about 250,000 BTU/hr. The glycerin needs no further processing or refining- as it comes from the biodiesel producer is fine. (I don't know much about biodiesel production, but I sure can burn the glycerin!) The only spec for the glycedrin is that the viscosity should be higher than 220 centistokes at 70 degrees F. (20 wt oil), and a water content no higher than 20%.

The great thing is glycerin now is the newest biofuel, and when used as an alternative heating fuel (via our burner) it is eligible for the $.50 tax credit.

I have tried to put most of the info on AlterHeat.com but contact me for more specifics.

Regards, Rick
That's a lot of BTU. Anything smaller, for say, a 2 car garage? And how much methanol can be tolerated?


'05 CRD B100
'01 TDi B100

 
Location: Colorado | Registered: March 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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And what is the consumption per hour? And has your glyc had the methanol distilled out, this is very important, if not the burn you are getting may be from the methanol in the glyc.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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From what we've read, glycerin contains approx. 70,000 to 80,000 BTU/gal. The smallest nozzle we can use is 2.0 gal/hour, so the lowest BTU is about 150,000. We have burned glycerin with the methanol removed, but it was hard to keep in a liquid state. We can reduce the viscosity by adding water or methanol. Again, we don't measure the alcohol content, we just make sure the glycerin is liquid at room temp. I understand that the glycerin from smaller producers may have a higher methanol content than larger commercial plants. We've had no problem burning either of these glycerins, regardless of the feedstock, as long as the viscosity guidelines are met.

We can get a good idea of the alcohol content by viewing the combustion flame. Glycerin burns extremely slowly, methanol very quickly. Low meth glycerin gives a large, "fluffy" flame, higher methanol concentrations give a tighter, shorter flame.

In fact we hope to market a version of the burner designed for high methanol content glycerin. We do not preheat the glycerin, and the higher meth concentrations ignite easier. We can eliminate the starting mixture pump assy, and ignite the glycerin directly. This will reduce the price by nearly half, and make the unit more affordable.

We use a standard SunTec fuel oil pump on a Beckett burner chassis to pump the glucerin at 200 psi. The maximum volume of this pump is about 3.5 gal/hr, so with this small burner we are limiteed to about 300,000 BTU with glycerin, 350-400,000 with wvo and regular fuel oil, and 500,000 with waste oil.

Rick
 
Location: Ohio | Registered: January 28, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Originally posted by Neurot:
My business has collected thousands of dollars for our sale of SVO, and from our use of sludge (the bottoms of the SVO barrels) and glycerin as boiler fuels.
Jason Burroughs
DieselGreen Fuels, Austin TX


I must just say Hmmmm
I suppose I should read the law.

But, I was under impression that this tax credit was intended for on-road vehicle fuel (or perhaps all purpose vehicle fuel).

I suppose that one should expect a similar credit for home heating oil, boats, ships (in US Territory), tractors, trains, etc.

What about liquid fuel being fed into a bio-reactor... to generate alcohols and gasses?
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Should probably read this thread, esp. the post by the EPA engineer:
http://biodiesel.infopop.cc/ev...561019771#7561019771


1-tank Elsbett VW TDI , 220,000 WVO miles.
http://ctbiodzl.freeshell.org/votdi.html
and a '92 F-250 with only a FPHE
 
Location: Ct,USA | Registered: November 19, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I read the post by EPA engineer. I am unfamiliar with the air pollution aspects, but I am familiar with home brewed biodiesel and the byproduct glycerol.

There would be virtually no sodium in the hydroxide or methylate form remaining in the glycerol.

All sodium (or potassium if KOH was the catalyst) present in the glycerol would be present as soap or possible salt. The age of glycerol from time of production until time of incineration allows ample time for all remaining catalyst that MAY have been present in the glycerol to fully convert to soap (or salt).

Therefore, it seams to me that "sodium in the air" risk is quite low. Most of the catalyst will end up in the bottom ash of any glycerol incinerator.
 
Location: Illinois | Registered: February 21, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hello,
I found the federal credit for using glycerine as a fuel, but does anyone have a list of incentives for burning glycerine at the state levels?

Please any links, contacts, or state info.
All help is appreciated. I've been searching high and low but have not been successful at finding any info on this.

Thanks!
 
Location: US | Registered: February 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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