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Should I compost or spray on dust?

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March 31, 2014, 03:11 PM
biopac
Should I compost or spray on dust?
I drive a lot (05 Jeep CRD and 01 Excursion 7.3)

I make about 40-45 gallons of B100 per week using KOH, my untreated WVO titrates about 3-4.

After the conversion is complete, I gradually heat to 195*F in order whole batch demeth in my GL style processor and recover about 4.5 gallons of Methanol.

From my conversion tank, I get 10-12 gallons of glycerol that I mix into my next dry batch of 50 gallons of WVO to pretreat it and my titration goes down to between 2 and 2.5. From my WVO pretreatment tank I drain 7-8 gallons of "spent" glyc and I want to do something with it now.

I would like to compost this "spent" glyc or use it for dust suppression since I live out in the country and the last mile to my house dirt. Do you have any experience for doing either one safely? Is my glyc considered "demethed" with my above process or do I need to heat it more? How do I test to know it's demethed.

Thanks in advance for your reply and your contribution to the home brew diesel producers.
March 31, 2014, 07:44 PM
john galt
If you're using it for dust control any residual methanol will evaporate and dissipate quickly.



March 31, 2014, 09:10 PM
dukegrad98
I agree with John. I've been known spread non-de-methed glycerol on a crushed rock road for dust and weed control at my ranch. Works great.

Cheers, John
April 01, 2014, 12:08 AM
Hamlin205
quote:
How do I test to know it's demethed.


put a little bit in a cap or on the ground and see if it lights with a lighter.
( Blue flame ) ( safer to use a long handled BBQ lighter )
We demeth batches of KOH glycerin that routinely yield 15% methanol ,and we run it up to
over 200F for hours until it stops.


[quote]I would like to compost this "spent" glyc or use it for dust suppression since I live out in the country and the last mile to my house dirt[quote]

Since you live out in the country, you probably have a chain saw.
Take the stuff that drops out of your fuel after de-meth ( we call it true soap )
and mix it with your demethed BDG 1/2 and 1/2 and use it as bar oil.
Can't say for sure but I think the chains are lasting longer.
Sure smells good when it gets hot. Smile

regards
Tom


1999 K3500 Dually with a new AMG 6.5TD turned up a bit by John Kennedy
Chevy DMax Totaled thanks to a 20 year old in a Mustang
Mercedes 300CDT
John Deere
On B99.?
April 01, 2014, 12:30 AM
john galt
quote:
Originally posted by Hamlin205:
Since you live out in the country, you probably have a chain saw.
Take the stuff that drops out of your fuel after de-meth ( we call it true soap )
and mix it with your demethed BDG 1/2 and 1/2 and use it as bar oil.
Can't say for sure but I think the chains are lasting longer.
Sure smells good when it gets hot. Smile
regards
Tom


That's fine as long as the temperature is above 50°F



April 01, 2014, 09:47 AM
Hamlin205
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
That's fine as long as the temperature is above 50°F


I left it in the truck bed the night before , it got down to 17
and it was in the 20's while in the woods. Yes it was thick but
the chainsaw warms it right up. I don;t use Potassium
, but from what you guys tell me, Probably would go with KOH BDG only.

@ -17 where you live John ?

regards to all
Tom


1999 K3500 Dually with a new AMG 6.5TD turned up a bit by John Kennedy
Chevy DMax Totaled thanks to a 20 year old in a Mustang
Mercedes 300CDT
John Deere
On B99.?
April 04, 2014, 08:08 AM
TheVol
I'm composting byproduct. I have a unique situation that makes it convenient. I operate a waste water plant and we employ aerobic digesters, so I just pour raw byproduct into the digester, the violent aeration de-meths the byproduct quickly as well as incorporates it into the biosolids, which after de-watering is mixed with waste wood chips for composting. The byproduct gives me an additional carbon source to complement the wood chips. The woodchip/byproduct/bio-solids mixture generates enough heat to pasteurize the biosolids rendering it a useful fertilizer and soil conditioner.