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WID???


mathematical elegance -- desired result achieved with minimal complication
 
Location: Manchester UK | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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WID???

EU Waste Incineration Directive, now incorpoated in IPPC regs.
 
Location: Ashford | Registered: March 12, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well I'm pretty sure I got it from that post but if you have any info on WID for glycerine I would love to see it.


mathematical elegance -- desired result achieved with minimal complication
 
Location: Manchester UK | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just as a sidenote, there's a company out there touting their boiler as a duel fuel fired burner that can burn glycerin.

AgSolutions
http://www.agsolutionsllc.com/

You have to mix the Glycerin with Bio or Waste Oil (like Murphy is doing), but they're supposedly really good boilers.

-Graydon




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Location: Utah | Registered: October 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Graydon Blair:
Just as a sidenote, there's a company out there touting their boiler as a duel fuel fired burner that can burn glycerin.

AgSolutions
http://www.agsolutionsllc.com/

I am planning o picking one of these units up on my trip to the convention in San Antonio next month . I spoke with the designer of them a few days ago and he states that it will actually burn 100% glycerol , but needs more frequent cleaning of the ash left behind . I am hoping to run mine on G100 and find out . I guess I can give a better answer to how it works in the coming months . The people selling them did seem to be really easy to deal with and were really helpfull . I am really looking forward to getting the unit operational and doing some playng with the various fuels it is supposed to be capable of burning .

You have to mix the Glycerin with Bio or Waste Oil (like Murphy is doing), but they're supposedly really good boilers.

-Graydon
 
Location: Crosby Tx. | Registered: June 14, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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[URL=www.ukfueltech.com][/URL] have a glycerol burner.


Slippery
Small steps taken one at a time
 
Location: Brisbane | Registered: January 30, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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The 850'C minimum combustion temperature is set in the UK under the waste incineration directive (WID). Commercial plants such as solvent recovery operations divert their plant vapour into a common incineration pathway, for example, and all the gases / vapour are burned at a minimum of 850'C for 2 seconds to ensure all chemicals are oxidised to CO2 and H20 in principle. www.trinity-research.co.uk
 
Registered: November 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The 850'C minimum combustion temperature is set in the UK under the waste incineration directive (WID). Commercial plants such as solvent recovery operations divert their plant vapour into a common incineration pathway, for example, and all the gases / vapour are burned at a minimum of 850'C for 2 seconds to ensure all chemicals are oxidised to CO2 and H20 in principle. [www.trinity-research.co.uk]www.trinity-research.co.uk[/URL]
 
Registered: November 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just a coincedence of chance or science that I got that same figure from a post of a guy who was probably talking in deg F then?

Got a link for that WID info?


mathematical elegance -- desired result achieved with minimal complication
 
Location: Manchester UK | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Dear Sirs,
Before thinking about burn glycerin could you please titrate amount of soap dissolved in crude Glycerin? Please know that soap not easy burn and may be create toxic gas too.
 
Registered: January 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This post has got me thinking. Last week I was burning some glycerin to dispose of it. Some boiled out of the pot and while adding another log to the fire it splashed me and I got some pretty good burns on my right arm and leg. I have been reading this post about the acrolein produced by burning glycerin.
 
Location: Memphis Tn | Registered: August 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We are currently working on a 60kW Stirling engine with custom glycerol burner. The engine is complete and will be available in a few months (about August). It is the burner we are focusing on. We use 20% biodiesel with 80% glycerol to achieve enough temperature to burn it cleanly. With about 110k BTUs per gallon we hope to get 60kW with 8 gallons of glycerol though this is still theoretical as the proof will be in the pudding . . . stay tuned, please!
 
Location: San Diego | Registered: May 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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In my day job as a environmental engineer working in air quality for state government, we have fielded requests to use the glycerol waste stream from biodiesel as boiler fuel. The sodium content of the stream pretty much makes it a non-starter. As I recall, the typical sodium content would give a particulate matter (PM) emission rate of over 3 lbs/mmBtu. I'm told the sodium (hydroxide and/or methoxide) would convert to an oxide of sodium (Na2O2, Na20, or Na02 depending on combustion conditions) upon combustion, then combine with atmospheric water to form NaOH mist. This process is used to recycle caustic from the "black liquor" stream in the Kraft paper industry, where of course they use the appropriate pollution control equipment to recover the stuff. Our resident paper mill expert has regaled me with stories of "recovery boiler" upsets that caused this caustic to rain down on the employee parking lot, ruining the paint on all the cars. The pollution control equipment required to control the PM emissions would be prohibitive on a small scale.

When you add up the following:
1. Sodium particulate emissions
2. Possibility of acrolein emissions
3. Lack of experience operating a boiler firing this material
4. Lack of comprehensive knowledge of the pollutant emissions from burning this stream..
you'll have a hard time getting air quality regulators to approve the use of the glycerol waste stream as a boiler fuel.


Hi Brbd.

I know that this is a very late reply to your post, but I've been looking into the option of welding a WVO/WMO/glyc burner/boiler/furnace som I've been reading up a little. Just trying to see if a cheap,safe & reliable system can be made that will cleanly burn glyc, producing no acrolein.

I'm already aware of the minimum temp requirement in order to prevent acrolein formation, so no need to go over that issue.

What I'm interested in the most is your statement regarding the sodium in the smoke.

A few questions:

1.If the glyc were neutralized before being burned, would the fly ash still be dangerous?

2. Assuming that the neutral PH glyc still makes dangerous ash, couldn't a person mist their smoke before it left the smokestack?

Wouldn't that wash out the scary salts?

Couldn't the salts be safely settled out of the mist water for later disposal?



I don't know if Brbd will be back to this thread or not, so if anyone reading has any answers, suggestions or other input, please chime in!
 
Registered: September 26, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't know, but I'm gonna stick with my argument I made way back on 12 December 2006:

Hydroxides are dangerous because they are highly reactive. But this high reactivity also makes them rapidly pick up carbon from the air and rather quickly turn to nice, neutral sodium bicarbonate or potassium bicarbonate.

How rapidly they "degrade" into other neutral compounds is part of the reason you have to keep your catalyst containers sealed and dry.

So don't run your glycerin burner in the rain, and you won't make any caustic rain.

I do like the idea of misting the exhaust...but then where are you going to divert that caustic slurry to? Maybe some sort of WVO FFA pre-treatment tank! You would then just have a lot of drying to do...
 
Location: Southern WI, USA | Registered: May 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So don't run your glycerin burner in the rain, and you won't make any caustic rain.



No, but you'll make caustic smoke. Not groovy.
 
Registered: September 26, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I do like the idea of misting the exhaust...but then where are you going to divert that caustic slurry to?



I would neutralise the costic slurry with some cheap industrial acid.

After getting 3 dfferent analyses done for biological oxygen demand & suspened solids, I would qualify 4 a permit to dump it into city sewers (provided it fell in within the maximum acceptable numbers for each test. I would have to retest annually to keep legal status.

At least, that's what the city sewer guy told me.
 
Registered: September 26, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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if you want to see a glycerin burner in action, burning 100% raw glycerin, check out this site: http://www.glycerinburners.com/
 
Registered: March 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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