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Made my first batch of liquid soap tonight which has brought about several questions:

1.Does the strong smell associated with the glycerine subside as it cures?

2.Does it thicken at all as it cures?

I process with KOH and use primarily soy oil. I used 1 litre water with 40 kg KOH/1 litre glyerine.

Thanks!
 
Registered: June 11, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sheep,
The smell does not change much with time.

Have you checked the pH of your finished soap to ensure that it is fully saponified? The pH should be between 8.0 and 9.5.

By adding a bit of traditional ingredients you can counter the scent a bit and adding some fragrance helps.

As far as thickness goes liquid soap made only by saponifying oils is fairly thin when diluted. This is true for our glycerin byproduct and traditional liquid soap. You can boil off some of the water and use it as a concentrate.

There are a few other things you can do that will boost the viscosity.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Rick K,


-Rick

http://www.knicenclean.com your single-most largest free BDG soaping content on the internet.
SAP Testing, Ingredient Properties, Soap Glossary and Recipes just to name a few.

Making Biodiesel Byproduct Soap Learn how to use your biodiesel byproducts to make great bar and liquid soap!!!

"Closing the loop on biodiesel production one bar at a time!"

Beware of the Dunning–Kruger effect.
 
Location: S.E. Michigan | Registered: April 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rick, I am very interested in making the liquid soap thicker, thick enough to suspend exfoliant in it. The most I have been able to get away with is using 2:1 glycerin to water- after that it gets all chunky like string cheese.

How much borax solution do you add by volume? Is cooking it longer necessary? Right now I just mix in the glycerin to the KOH solution and mix until it turns dark.



 
Registered: April 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I actually hot process all my soaps.

So I cook my liquid soap until it is fully saponified. It is important in liquid soap to do this for a couple of reasons. One is that anything that is not saponified in liquid soap can go rancid over time. This is true for bar soap too but not to the same degree. The second reason is when adding the borax the soap should be fully saponified because the borax also will neutralize some of the caustic.

You can make the soap quite thick using borax, especially if you have oils low in lauric and myristic acids.

I have added exfoliate to my cream soaps and they work as well as commercial brands. Suspension in liquid requires the soap to be just beyond the chunky stage you mention with borax as a viscosity builder. It ends up closer to a gel than a liquid.

The soaps I make are Bar, gel, liquid and cream. I have used KOH glycerin to make nice solid bars and also NaOH to make nice liquid.

I have adapted traditional techniques and also use traditional ingredients to add properties to all my soaps. At times I make liquid from only the biodiesel glycerin byproduct.

I usually find that the glycerin from my sources benefits from adding lathering properties. Others may find their glycerin suitable as is.

For my bar soap I always add hardening ingredients.


-Rick

http://www.knicenclean.com your single-most largest free BDG soaping content on the internet.
SAP Testing, Ingredient Properties, Soap Glossary and Recipes just to name a few.

Making Biodiesel Byproduct Soap Learn how to use your biodiesel byproducts to make great bar and liquid soap!!!

"Closing the loop on biodiesel production one bar at a time!"

Beware of the Dunning–Kruger effect.
 
Location: S.E. Michigan | Registered: April 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rick, I have reciently started making soap using the Biodiesel Glycerine soap Guide.
I am having trouble getting the PH down below 11. I keep reading about this hot
process. Can you explain it or let me know where I can get the details.
Thanks, John
 
Registered: April 21, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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John,
I sent you a PM with my contact information.

I would be happy to help you work through your issues.


-Rick

http://www.knicenclean.com your single-most largest free BDG soaping content on the internet.
SAP Testing, Ingredient Properties, Soap Glossary and Recipes just to name a few.

Making Biodiesel Byproduct Soap Learn how to use your biodiesel byproducts to make great bar and liquid soap!!!

"Closing the loop on biodiesel production one bar at a time!"

Beware of the Dunning–Kruger effect.
 
Location: S.E. Michigan | Registered: April 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Rick,

What "essential oils" etc. would you recommend adding to my "first attempt" soap as described above. I would like it to lather a bit.

Also, how long does it need to cure before using it to soak a really nasty pair of overalls?!

Looking forward to your book
 
Registered: June 11, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I like lavender -- it's a good one to start with and does a great job of removing the glycerin byproduct smell.


-Rick

http://www.knicenclean.com your single-most largest free BDG soaping content on the internet.
SAP Testing, Ingredient Properties, Soap Glossary and Recipes just to name a few.

Making Biodiesel Byproduct Soap Learn how to use your biodiesel byproducts to make great bar and liquid soap!!!

"Closing the loop on biodiesel production one bar at a time!"

Beware of the Dunning–Kruger effect.
 
Location: S.E. Michigan | Registered: April 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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