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Sediment / varnish in fuel filter?
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P D Vancouver,
Back up to (BIODIESEL QUALITY) and read (GUMMY SUBSTANCE) by (THANKS).
Dave
 
Location: Wellsburg WV | Registered: December 16, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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John Galt
The flaky substance is non magnetic & will support combustion, burning slowly & somewhat poorly when a propane torch is touched to it.

A further thought, I'm sure many of us have observed a brownish stain from Biodiesel, I have numerous on my brewing equipment where some BD was spilt / leaked & left. It seems to eventually dry leaving a stain. I suspect this may be the source of these flakes, dried on fuel from the walls inside the fuel tank on the boat. This is not like the "GUMMY SUBSTANCE" discussed by Thanks in the Biodiesel Quality forum. Thanks talks about this gummy substance as a result of blending w/ petrol, where as I always run B100 & it is not gummy but flakes & only found in the Racor filter. I recently inspected inside the fuel tank & found it to be very clean with no deposits of anything. I used a small mirror & light to inspect the sides of tank but in the limited area I could view, I could see nothing abnormal.
PD

This message has been edited. Last edited by: PD.Vancouver,
 
Location: Vancouver | Registered: November 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Any new comments on this? I notice a small amount accumulating in Racor sediment bowl again. It was cleaned out last July.
Thanks. PD
 
Location: Vancouver | Registered: November 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Vancouver,
We are still having issues also, we are finding brown, red deposits in the fuel tanks and filters and inside injection pumps so I contacted an injection pump company that services pumps and ask what the sediment was and he said (possibly) it could be bacteria, He told me that as of 2011 the diesel fuel processing companies have taken the sulfur out of the red fuel same now as the on road fuel and this he says was the poison that keeps the bacteria from growing. I told him that I was running bio and he said it is a hydro carbon same as diesel and bacteria likes it even better. He went on to say that it grows in moist dark cool tanks that sit around ,alot like our older tractors. He said to start running bacticide in all the tractors.I have started this but have noticed some brown still hitting the filter but then again I have not started with a clean tank either.
What ever this stuff is it gets past the filters and is deposited on metal parts in the injection pump so maybe it starts to grow on warm metal parts first then from there it goes through the return line to the tank were it can continue growing. He said he cleans with acetone so I took a paint brush and found that it does come off pretty fast on the injection parts. I have one tractor that we are running with a dose of acetone added to the fuel only , I want to open the injection pump at a later date and see if the heat, vibration can clean the pump while running the tractor.
Dave
 
Location: Wellsburg WV | Registered: December 16, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If acetone cuts it then the deposit is likely glycerol/soap in the BD that settled out of solution with the residual methanol as the methanol evaporated. It gets through filters in solution then 'plaques out' onto surfaces like 'varnish' in gasoline fuel systems. It's a common occurrence.

For anything microbial to grow the fuel must be wet. Nothing will 'grow' in dry fuel. Blaming 'critters' in the fuel is another mechanic excuse.

I add 4oz acetone & 4oz gum-turpentine per 90 liter tankful to my fuel blends; it keeps the system clean and improves combustion, especially on cold starts.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have started using acetone too. It has really improved the combustion of my car. My gas mileage has improved by about 40%. A friend of mine explained it that the acetone conditions the diesel so that it burns more completely. Now instead of a lot of my fuel going out the exhaust unburning the acetone makes it burn completely. He said he has gotten a 60% improvement in gas mileage. I never heard of using turpentine before.
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
I add 4oz acetone & 4oz gum-turpentine per 90 liter tankful to my fuel blends; it keeps the system clean and improves combustion, especially on cold starts.
 
Location: Louisiana | Registered: February 17, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Acetone fuel additive does not improve MPG significantly in my experience. I notice the improvement in fuel combustion by almost no exhaust smoke on cold start up.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I do not know why you are not seeing a big increase in mpg. I am sure you are disappointed.
I once had an old diesel that smoked a lot when it started up. I was told the problem was low compression. It is probably the gum turpentine you use that is giving you a better seal and higher compression. It just occured to me that you should probably increase the acetone in your fuel.
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Acetone fuel additive does not improve MPG significantly in my experience. I notice the improvement in fuel combustion by almost no exhaust smoke on cold start up.
 
Location: Louisiana | Registered: February 17, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
I do not know why you are not seeing a big increase in mpg.


Do some research and you might find out why acetone additive does not generally increase MPG.

Have a nice day



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I did some research and this is what I found.
Added to the fuel tank in tiny amounts, acetone aids in the vaporization of the gasoline or diesel, increasing fuel efficiency, engine longevity, and performance -- as well as reducing hydrocarbon emissions.
Complete vaporization of fuel is far from perfect in today's cars and trucks. A certain amount of residual fuel in most engines remains liquid in the hot chamber. In order to be fully combusted, the fuel must be fully vaporized.
Acetone drastically reduces the surface tension. Most fuel molecules are sluggish with respect to their natural frequency. Acetone has an inherent molecular vibration that "stirs up" the fuel molecules, to break the surface tension. This results in a more complete vaporization with other factors remaining the same. More complete vaporization means less wasted fuel, hence the increased gas mileage from the increased thermal efficiency.
That excess fuel was formerly wasted past the rings or sent out the tailpipe but when mixed with acetone it gets burned, though the engine still thinks it is running straight gas.

Maybe your problem has something to do with your engine smoking.

quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
quote:
I do not know why you are not seeing a big increase in mpg.


Do some research and you might find out why acetone additive does not generally increase MPG.

Have a nice day
 
Location: Louisiana | Registered: February 17, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Dear John Galt I realise you are very experienced in all Biodiesel matter and would ask re the brown deposit when using B100 re does the acetone dissolve it? Or does one have to use the Turps as well ? There is one problem I have had since 2007 in that some of that brown stuff contaminates
the suction control valves on our common rail Toyota Landcruiser D4D.
It seems unusual but the filter does not seem to harbor any significant amount of it. One cannot
see anything emitting from these valves when I actuate them ( 6 VOLTS)in various fluids. There is a problem with these valves sticking . The same is found when burning mineral diesel but on B100 the problem is often.

So just to confirm, acetone & turpentine would dissolve the brown stuff which I thought you said was glycerol which is what I suspected but cannot prove?

It seems looking at the previous posts to the end of 2013 the resolution was not published.
Regards Mick Nottingham UK
 
Location: Nottingham in England | Registered: August 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In my experience the only solvent that dissolved the 'brown stuff' was caustic solution like oven cleaner.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Pressurejet: So just to confirm, acetone & turpentine would dissolve the brown stuff which I thought you said was glycerol which is what I suspected but cannot prove?

Whatever dissolves it depends on what the stuff is. Try methanol or ethanol or household cloudy ammonia. If you wash it with boiling water, what is left behind?
 
Location: New Zealand | Registered: August 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A basic chemistry principle is like dissolves like. The brown stuff that formed is a product of reaction of oxygen with biodiesel (oxidation of biodiesel). Generally biodiesel is a mixture of different types of methyl fatty acid esters. A fatty acid is like vinegar which has a 2 carbon chain , with a carboxylic weak acid on one end of it, but the fatty acid can have 12 to 22 carbon atoms bonded to each other in a chain, with a carboxylic acid functional group on the carbon atom on the end. Some fatty acids have one, two or three double bonds in the carbon chain. When oxidation occurs an oxygen molecule that's two oxygen bonded to each other attach to one of the double bonds. I have forgotten the exact reaction mechanism but after a few specific steps, two fatty acid chains attach to each other through one oxygen atom in about the middle of the chains on one of the two carbon atoms that were previously double bonded to each other. So a molecule that had a molecular weight of maybe 278 grams per mole now has double that molecular weight plus 16 the atomic weight per mole of one oxygen atom. It's like polymerization in a way. The middle of a long carbon chain bonds/attaches to a second long carbon chain bonded to each other through one oxygen atom. Generally the methyl fatty acid ester is largely non-polar. Since like dissolves like (non-polar dissolves non-polar) ether might dissolve the brown stuff. But ether can be dangerous. Ether forms explosive peroxides if it gets old, and the crushers have tightened down on getting chemicals in the USA since the Muslim terrorists knocked down the twin towers in New York, in the USA. Maybe you can get ether in the UK to test if the brown stuff dissolves in ether. I believe the reaction is called autoOxidation. Light, some metals in contact with biodiesel , heat and oxygen gas presence are factors in causing it to occur.

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Location: Texas | Registered: April 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Another thought from memory try carb cleaner which is a third each of methanol, acetone and toluene. An extremely versatile substance to have handy.
 
Location: New Zealand | Registered: August 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The brown deposit that various people describe is quite likely not the same substance in all cases.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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