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What additive to use? Petroleum diesel, petrol or coldflow 350 etc ?
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Hi Folks

Just want to check what most biodiesel users add to prevent gelling in winter? Last year the temperature dropped to as low as -18 degrees celcius where i live and i want to be prepared for this winter. Ive been producing bio as last couple of months and the thought of going back to using regular diesel at £1.40 a litre isnt very attractive!

The coldflow 350 seems like the most cost effective but not sure if it really works ?


VW Golf MK4 1.9 tdi - B100
 
Location: Northern Ireland | Registered: January 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Two factors should be considered when using biodiesel in cold temperatures.

1. the filter and screen clogging fat-biodiesel that drops out of solution below about 10°C
and
2. the cloud point temperature at which the remaining clear biodiesel starts to 'slush-up'.

I use stove oil [aka kerosene] and petrol to lower the gel temperature of the remaining clear biodiesel.

Prior to freezing temperatures I dilute to B50 and let the fat-biodiesel drop out, then pump from the clear layer above. The storage tank is exposed to ambient temperature.

The percent dilution effects the cloud point.


Useful information here:
http://www.extension.org/pages...-cold-weather-issues



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The graph shows Cloud Point Temperature for mixtures of canola biodiesel with kerosene.





ImagecanolaBD.gif (44 Kb, 147 downloads)
 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Effectiveness of Cold Flow Additives on Various Biodiesels, Diesel, and Their Blends

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org
Citation: Transactions of the ASABE. 51(4): 1365-1370. @2008
Authors: D. S. Shrestha, J. Van Gerpen, J. Thompson
Keywords: Biodiesel blend, Biofuel, Cloud point, Fuel additives, Pour point.

One of the major reasons hindering the use of biodiesel is its filter plugging temperature, which is higher than that of No. 2 diesel. Cloud point (CP) and pour point (PP) temperatures have been shown to be well correlated with filter plugging point, which primarily determines the operability of a diesel engine in cold weather. Many biodiesel cold flow additives are available in the market that claim to reduce pour point. In this study, neat and blended biodiesel fuels from different feedstocks were tested for change in CP and PP with various cold flow additives at 100%, 200%, and 300% of the specified loading (application) rate. The additives in general worked better for ethyl esters than for methyl esters. Average reductions in CP and PP for neat mustard methyl esters were 0.3°C and 7.2°C , respectively, compared to 3°C and 19.4°C for mustard ethyl ester at the recommended loading rate. In general, mustard biodiesel responded to additives better than soybean or used vegetable oil biodiesel for reducing PP. The effect of additives on CP of diesel fuel was not statistically significant, but PP was reduced to < -36°C with all additives at recommended loading. This result is expected as additives are mainly targeted to inhibit the crystal growth not necessarily the onset of crystallization. The additives were found to be more effective in diesel than in biodiesel for reducing PP, and hence the higher the percentage of diesel in a blend, the better the effectiveness was. Most additives reduced the PP of B20 and lower blends to < -36°C at 100% loading, and all additives did that at 200% loading. No added benefit was observed at more than 200% loading.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thats for the info!


VW Golf MK4 1.9 tdi - B100
 
Location: Northern Ireland | Registered: January 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Bio from fish oil apparently works well in low temperatures and others report blending in used motor oil helps. I'm not recommending UMO just flagging possibilities to research. I do use 10% UMO (not for low temps) myself in one of my fueling drums and have had no issues in an IDI and PD motor.
 
Registered: August 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I run a little commercial additive. Don't remember the name but it is available at most truck stops and stores. When it gets below freezing a start adding winterized diesel. We have a local gas station which sells winterized diesel it goes down to -25F or approximately -20C. When the weather is really cold, down below 0F my wife and I run B50 using this winterized diesel. Never a problem even at -20F.

John Galt, is there a graph of biodiesel / gas (petro) ratios as you posted for kerosene?

By the way, #2 diesel treated with a good anti-gel additive has lower CP & PP than kerosene and #1 diesel.
 
Registered: January 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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