BIODIESEL & SVO DISCUSSION FORUMS





Sponsors    Biodiesel and SVO Forums Home    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Environment  Hop To Forums  Environmental Links    The Status of Camelina Biofuel

Moderators: Shaun, The Trouts
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
The Status of Camelina Biofuel
 Login/Join
 
Member
posted
Camelina is one of the newest darlings as a biodiesel feedstock. Hype aside, what indeed is the real status of camelina in terms of biodiesel production? Are there are any medium or large scale biodiesel refineries using camelina as a feedsatock?

My interest in camelina was further piqued when I saw this post that claimed all flights will run on camelina biofuel by 2025 . That sounds preposterous to me.

To my knowledge, no one is producing biofuel on even a medium scale from camelina right now. How are folks certain that this feedstock is the best and could scale to produce commercial quantities of biofuels?

What is your take on camelina as a biofuel feedstock?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: solarant,
 
Registered: November 08, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
It's better than growing hay.

You generate biomass, improve the soil, and produce a little bit of oil. There are a lot of reasons to believe that Camelina has a future in this country. Additionally government support programs provide some incentives to farmers willing to experiment with this crop.

I have some concern that the unique properties of camelina oil will result in it being used more for nutrition us than for biodiesel. There's a little bit of speculation in that statement though.
 
Location: CO, CA, KS, or FL | Registered: January 17, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Why use scarce water, fertilizer, and arable land to grow fuel crops, when the same land/water/fertilizer could grow more profitable food crops?

It will always be cheaper to make diesel fuel from abundant coal, nat-gas or heavy oil, and the infrastructure to do it is already in place.

The biofuel aviation scam is nothing more than greenwashing to get a bigger market share of the guilty eco-yuppies jetting about to save the world.

The only place growing fuel makes sense is where the fuel grown is processed locally and used to run the farm. In that case camelina has some potential.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Why use scarce water, fertilizer, and arable land to grow fuel crops, when the same land/water/fertilizer could grow more profitable food crops?

Camelina and Canola are grown around here because they don't need irrigation or fertilizer, and because the food crop (wheat) requires a fallow year between crops. By growing one of these oilseed crops during the years between food crops, less fertilizer is used, less pesticide is used, and the farmer gets a second money crop. It's economics. The local biodiesel plant is owned by the wheat growers union.
If you grow the same food crops on the same land every year, you kill the soil. Then you rely on chemicals to keep the soil productive, which is expensive and ultimately counter-productive. Food crops are not "more profitible" - that's a bad assumption.
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
That's true, in some specific cases growing fuel might be economical as long as fertilizer and irrigation isn't necessary.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
That's good, it will be very helpful for the future perspective.
 
Location: 10006 272nd St NW Stanwood, WA 98292 | Registered: August 21, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post



Member
posted Hide Post
Camelina in addition to Canola usually are harvested close to in this article simply because don't require irrigation or fertilizer, in addition to for the reason that foodstuff crop (wheat) uses a fallow year among herbs. By growing one of those oilseed herbs in the many years among foodstuff herbs, much less fertilizer is used, much less pesticide is used, and also the farmer will get a second cash crop. It's economics. The area biodiesel place is held by the rice prop nation.


NoorAlamShahzad
 
Location: United states  | Registered: March 21, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
member

posted Hide Post
Fuelfarmer did some experiments with growing camelina a couple years ago. Perhaps he could chime in and give some first hand knowledge on the subject?



** Biodiesel Glycerine Soap - The Guide
- on 5 continents helping people make & sell soap from the Biodiesel Glycerine.


 
Location: :-) Great White North eh ? | Registered: December 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

Sponsors    Biodiesel and SVO Forums Home    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Environment  Hop To Forums  Environmental Links    The Status of Camelina Biofuel

© Maui Green Energy 2000 - 2014