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Chilled, upflow, chip filter
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Well, much to the shock of my wife, I found another use for my kegerator! Big Grin
I live in Canada and it seems as soon as the needle drops to about 5c I start getting fats precipitating out of my fuel, this is worrisome, I dont like the thoughts of that precipitate coming out in my fuel tank. So I decided to make a chilled wood chip filter in the hopes of removing many of these fats before they hit the tank.
My cherished keg fridge can get down to about minus 3c so I thought it would be a perfect choice to chill the chips down. I plan on starting out at about 0c to see how well it goes, I am worried that it will just plug up with the fats in a short time and plug the filter completely, but I figure its worth a shot...
On the first test run I realized that my diaphragm pump needs repair, it takes almost 20PSI to run it and that is far more then the plastic drum seal can take (just ask how I know that!). I am hoping I can set the PSI for around 3 and just let it pump away very slowly...
Its all 1/4 ID tubing from the pump. The pump has a 3/4" input from the unfiltered tote and feeds through the 1/4" tubing via the refrigerated chip drum into a 1 micron sock filter hanging in the receiver tote.
I will update here with the results once I fix my pump and give it a good test with at least 100l of fuel. I thought I would post here in the mean time just in case someone has any good suggestions for me! Wink
I put up some pics of what I have so far here: http://biodieselpictures.com/viewtopic.php?t=847
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Once the temperature stays below freezing I mix stove oil with the biodiesel and keep this barrel outside. The 'stuff' which clogs filters and screens settles to the bottom of the barrel in the cold and I pump from the clear upper layer through a 5µ filter into the vehicle tank.
The percent of stove oil depends on the operating temperature expected.
The graph shows cloud point temperature of cold filtered biodiesel blends vs temperature.





ImagecanolaBD.gif (44 Kb, 70 downloads)
 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jon, any updates on the kegerator set up? I kicked this around awhile ago, but then summer hit. It's on my mind again. I was wondering how it worked out.


powering
2 bobcats, an excavator, and a ventrac mower. looking for a diesel weedeater!
 
Location: morgantown wv | Registered: June 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi RR,
No, I still haven't gotten around to tearing down my diaphragm pump yet...
I am running around like a one armed paper hanger here, trying to get ready for winter... Too many irons in the fire at the moment...
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Its pumped about 500l through the chips since 4:30 yesterday, at -3C. Its working great so far and is still not building any pressure...
It looks like its working too! Big Grin
The 2 vials have been sitting in my fridge at 4c for a couple of hours now. Though the pic doesn't do it justice you can see the precipitate in the unfiltered vial on the right pretty clearly, there is also about a half an inch of the white stuff in the bottom cone of the vial that is difficult to see in the pic. The filtered vial on the left is still crystal clear with no sign of precipitate whatsoever! Smile


I am going to put them in the freezer over night and see what comes out of them when they thaw tomorrow...
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well it looks like the days of crap floating around in my fuel tanks come the cold weather are over!
It works better then I had hoped.
I froze the above 2 vials solid in the freezer last night and then put them in the fridge to slowly thaw out. This morning the vials looked the same as above, the filtered one is still crystal clear while all the precipitate has settled to the bottom of the unfiltered vial. There is absolutely 0 fall out or precipitate visible in the cold filtered vial!
So far I have passed about 1000 litres through the little drum and I have about 500 more to go, its not showing any pressure increase whatsoever on the input pressure gauge so far.
So to recap;
Slow filtering at about 40 litres/min upflow through hard wood chips cooled to about -3C makes for fuel that wont have precipitates in the cold weather. At least on this batch of oil! Wink
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Jon, do you have any idea how far it helped your gel point? It would be great to see what temp the filtered fuel clouds up at.( I wish I had a walk in freezer). I have an extra frige to give this a try. I've run the same filters in all my equipment all summer, last week, we had a night with 18F within the next day, my filters were clogging up. For the last couple of years, once I change the filters I use all summer, I can get another month out of b100 before I have to just give up and go to dino. . our fuel usually gels between 12- 15 F at b100. It still seems reasonably liquid at that temp, but the solid component of the fuel at that temp, clogs up the filters right away. I wonder if I can get a my existing fridge to go down to 10F or get the freezer up to that temp.

This really has the wheels turning! It may be time to go drill some holes in the fridge.
Thanks again Jon!


powering
2 bobcats, an excavator, and a ventrac mower. looking for a diesel weedeater!
 
Location: morgantown wv | Registered: June 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've been cold filtering for two winters now and in my experience with canola based biodiesel, cold filtering does not lower the gel point, but rather filters out the high melt point components that drop out of the fuel solution and cause problems. Diluting the BD with stove oil, kerosene, winter diesel, or petrol is the only effective means I've found to reduce the gel point temperature. We've already experienced minus 40s in central Alaska this past week, it's what you might call a 'walk out' freezer, it's very useful for testing cold fuel blends.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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No, I am not sure about the gel point. The biodiesel trickles from the kegerator into a bag filter I have in the top of a tote, it seems pretty thick, it is very slow to drain out of the 5 micron bag so I suspect its somewhat gelled just coming out of the -3 fridge...
I blend with pump diesel now anyways, it was -8c here last night.
Its that filter plugging white crap that precipitates out that is my main concern.
This is my first year blending throughout the winter so it will all be a learning experience.... Wink
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I will have to try this also to see if it helps with filter plugging. I have one machine that is small enough to push into the garage if it is frozen. I can deal with it not starting. the snow plow trucks not starting at 3am is a different story.


powering
2 bobcats, an excavator, and a ventrac mower. looking for a diesel weedeater!
 
Location: morgantown wv | Registered: June 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Jon,
Sorry to resurrect an "older" thread but didn't see the need to start another just to ask a question. I wanted to ask if you were still employing your cold filter technique as a part of your S.O.P. for winter bio production? I have an old refrigerated sampler that I could convert very easily but wanted to get your take on whether you felt it was ultimately a worthwhile extra step. Thanks
 
Location: The Volunteer State | Registered: July 07, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
still employing your cold filter technique as a part of your S.O.P. for winter bio production?


yes



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Originally posted by TheVol:
Hi Jon,
Sorry to resurrect an "older" thread but didn't see the need to start another just to ask a question. I wanted to ask if you were still employing your cold filter technique as a part of your S.O.P. for winter bio production? I have an old refrigerated sampler that I could convert very easily but wanted to get your take on whether you felt it was ultimately a worthwhile extra step. Thanks

Yes I sure am, I swear by it now!
I burned about B50~B60 all winter (splash blending in the Duramax fuel tank) and started burning B100 in March this year. I am still burning b100 now, and it has dropped down to 0C a couple of times with no filter plugging whatsoever. Seeing the amount of the HMPE left in the chips when I clean out the drum is also a good indicator of how well it works.
I would recommend this method to anyone who lives in cooler climates as it removes all HMPE. Its also handy to know that I am good to -3C (-3C is what I keep the chips at) before I have to worry about gelling.
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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All my fuel is cold upflow filtered, and using water absorbing polymer for 'polishing' instead of wood chips.

My stock winter fuel mix is 50 parts BD; 35 parts Kerosene/jetA/D#1/stove oil; 15 parts petrol/gasoline (<E5) [Summer mix has 5 parts petrol; 10 parts clean, dry UVO instead of all petrol]

The fuel mix is circulated through a column of polymer water absorbing 'crystals', until a sample of the mix tests to <50ppm H2O. One or two passes is generally enough.

It's stored at ambient outdoor temperature and the inlet of the fuel dispensing pump is kept in the clear fuel layer as the HMPE components settle out on the bottom of the barrel as the temperature drops.

Final filtering is through a 5µ string wound filter cartridge and into the vehicle tank. The final filter lasts for years.

The fuel mix in the vehicle tank is adjusted with pump diesel for the ambient operating temperature so that the fuel mix in the tank does not gel. The mix in the vehicle tank varies from 15% BD to 50% BD seasonally.

It's been down to zero F already this winter and the fuel mix in the truck is crystal clear, with no 'stuff' settling out.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Wow! Guys, I'm seriously impressed with the thoughtfulness and effort you both have put into this. Very very impressive. One question...the HMPE, do you just wait until warmer temps return in summer and then its good to go? Thanks again.
 
Location: The Volunteer State | Registered: July 07, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
the HMPE, do you just wait until warmer temps return in summer and then its good to go?

Yup, it's a simple self regulating system.

I run a tankful of B5 before it gets cold to purge the summer fuel, or I drain the tank, whichever is easier.

My truck has a fuel system designed for the 'outback' with a fuel sedimenter in the fuel line.

http://www.dieselpartsdirect.c...00-Delphi-Sedimenter
That makes it easy to monitor fuel condition and catch fuel samples for testing..

Where it's winter for half the year one learns to make systems reliable...
or experience uncomfortable misadventures in the bitter cold, at inopportune times, and inconvenient places.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One element not largely considered is when the vehicle sleeps inside a heated garage. The fuel in the tank is therefore at that temp from the onset.

It takes 2 full hours at -18C for my fuel to gel from room temp, however I can go out and do what I need to do for the afternoon at -8 to -10C on B100 without a worry as the fuel will be returning to the tank as I drive and this fuel is heated by the engine thereby prolonging the dreaded geling effect. The heat given off by an operating engine will also help keep the smaller lines gel free.

So if it sleeps heated you can get away with running around much longer than your gel point indicates in sedentary tests.

All of this is pointless if the vehicle sleeps in the cold ... You then can set up a heated fuel system and run B100 year round irrespective of outside temps.



** Biodiesel Glycerine Soap - The Guide
- on 5 continents helping people make & sell soap from the Biodiesel Glycerine.


 
Location: :-) Great White North eh ? | Registered: December 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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