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Improving Biodiesel color

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http://biodiesel.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/5521001332/m/2427065183

July 26, 2017, 11:34 PM
Yuka
Improving Biodiesel color
Hello:

My name is Eduardo Giron im the General Manager of Energia Giron SA, located in Yucatan, México.

We are Biodiesel producers.
We want to improve our Biodiesel color by trying bleaching materials.
We have heard great things about Bentonite and Activated clays for bleaching vegetable oils.

Our product has good quality. At lesst >98.8% and less than 50ppm KOH.
Have being using B30 (blended with our BD) for more than 100,000 miles in both company trucks.

Bottom line, we dont want to use the clays to bleach the oil prior to process.
We want to bleach our final and polished product, just to improve color.

We read about the subject and found that clays work while mixing at relatively high temperature.

We dont want to heat and mix or stir our final product with clays, we want to use it as a column type filter media. Let it flow at slow rate thru the clay (packed in the column to get good contact time)
We centrifugue our BD after removing glicerol, we have a column packed wit wood shavings and sawdust and the final polish is a column with ion exchange resin. Both columns upflow system.

I want to mix the clay (fullers earth, bentonite, zeolite) with the sawdust in the column.

Could this work?

Thanks.
Eduardo.

Biodiesel sample

July 27, 2017, 02:21 AM
WesleyB
Bleaching? I think you need to remove the brown colored material. I made biodiesel with methanol. I treated it with magnesium silicate at 60 degrees centigrade for 30 minutes with agitation, fast stirring. The magnesium silicate I used was a white powder. That was an acid esterification procedure, I would have to find my notebook on it. But after magnesium silicate treatment of about 2 grams per litre of biodiesel, the white magnesium silicate powder was brown before vacuum filtration with 1 micrometer porus filter paper to remove all the powder that had not settled out. Bleaching solvated, dissolved materials introduces chlorine bleach into the material (biodiesel) so that chlorine is in the exhaust of the vehicles (bad). Removing the colored material rather than decomposing it with bleach is probably a better choice for better clean product . A company in Dallas, Texas used to make and sell Magnesol, which may have been food grade magnesium silicate for use in restaurants. Bleaching decomposes materials that remain in the biodiesel, removing the colored materials may be a better choice. The bleach is still in the biodiesel too it burns and goes out the exhaust.
July 27, 2017, 08:19 AM
Yuka
Thanks Wesley.


I didnt meant bleach. I meant removing color, but it seems for fuel the correct term is bleaching.
I said bleaching materials like powder clays. Calcium Bentonite, zeolite, etc. Even Magnesol, never chloride. Im not that rookie.

Only using them as a filter media, like if it were ion exchange resin. No temp, no agitation.

Thanks again.
July 27, 2017, 04:58 PM
Dgs
Hi Yuka, Although silicates like magnesol and sepiolite will lighten the colour of the biodiesel they are not as effective as leaving the biodiesel in the sun to bleach.

Apparantly the action of the U/V produces free radicals that will bleach most of the colour out of the bio. The results are quite amazing.

It may be possible to use a U/V light inside a tube that you recirculate the bio through.

Just looking through your post again, calcium bentonite doesn't work as regards reducing the colour. If you mix sepiolite with your wood chips it will work to an extent but the sepiolite soon gets 'spent'

Leave a cubie of your bio in the sun and you will see what I mean.
July 27, 2017, 05:13 PM
Yuka
Thanks DGS.
Will give it a try with the cubie and try to adapt a UV light for our continous process.

Does it affect the Biodiesel quality?
Accelerates degradation?
Where does the fade go?

Thanks again.
Yuka.
July 27, 2017, 05:23 PM
Dgs
I've used this proceedure for years and have never noticed any difference in quality or any degredation of the bio.

The free radicals attack the carotenoids in the biodiesel. As to why the colour changes I have no idea.

Yuka, I've sent you a pm.
July 27, 2017, 09:34 PM
Yuka
Thanks DGS.
Will give it a try with the cubie and try to adapt a UV light for our continous process.

Does it affect the Biodiesel quality?
Accelerates degradation?
Where does the fade go?

Thanks again.
Yuka.
July 27, 2017, 09:50 PM
Yuka
quote:
Originally posted by Dgs:
I've used this proceedure for years and have never noticed any difference in quality or any degredation of the bio.

The free radicals attack the carotenoids in the biodiesel. As to why the colour changes I have no idea.

Yuka, I've sent you a pm.



Saw the pictures. Amazing color change.
Do you think this could work?

http://www.deltaqua.eu/epages/...s/UV14W&Locale=en_GB


My process consists;

Glycerol enhaced pretreatmeant, two stage transesterification, removing glycerol, centrifuging, and polishing first with sawdust and woodchips, finally resin and 2 micron filter.

I always get >99% convertion and les than 50 ppm of KOH.
Just want to improve the reddish color for one specific customer.

Should i try it on finished product?
Thanks again Dave.

Yuka.
July 28, 2017, 07:06 AM
Dgs
Those U/V filters that are in the picture could work. Your bio would have to be recirculated until you could see the colour changing which could take some time.

If you used a economical pump then maybe this would be something you could leave switched on for extended periods.

Is the centrifuge you use pressure or motor driven.
July 28, 2017, 08:22 AM
Yuka
Thanks my dear friend.

This is my Centrifuge;
https://usfiltermaxx.com/en/wv...000g-centrifuge.html

Is motor driven fed it with a diaphragm pump.
July 28, 2017, 01:13 PM
Dgs
That centrifuge looks superb, wish I had something like that. Let us know the results of your cubie test.