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Bio Diesel in Pressure Jet Burners.
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Ye I figured it out after IMB told me about he element with this as part of it , I didnt realise thats the idea behind the set up. Jut sent you a pm Thanks.
 
Registered: September 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a batch of WMO that has brake fluid in it, it has totally sooted the propane bottle oil boiler and i have to do a total strip down to clean it up. Is there any way i could remove the brake fluid or do i just need to get rid of the 200 litres of WMO in the barrel?
 
Location: Galway | Registered: January 23, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Zamo, the cable just gets warm, there is no thermostat.
Ive spent the morning testing various samples of gasoil, and wmo/kerosene.
First I can confirm that you cant do this by specific gravity. the SG of kero is 800 and the SG of my WMO is 877 so mixed 60%WMO/40% kero I got an SG of 845, an exact match for gasoil. But this 60/40 mix had much higher viscosity than gasoil.
By trial and error I found that with this particular WMO a 50/50 mix was within 5% of the viscosity of gasoil. ( all my measurements were at 12°C, I would want to confirm that I get the same results at a much colder temperatures, say 0°C)
So a 50/50 mix would represent a saving of 50% on the cost of heating a home. The cost of the three tank system would be minimal, a couple of hundred tops if you bought every thing new. WMO is available free.
I will compare the flash points of the gasoil and the 50/50 mix tomorrow, but flash point is less critical than viscosity.

Thierry, brake fluid is a menace in WMO. The upflow method might help, Ill look into it.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I couldnt wait to do the flash point tests so here are the results.
green diesel/gasoil 85°C
50%wmo/50%kero 78°C
In this case the wmo/kero ( black gasoil) will ignite more easily than diesel when starting from cold.
The similar viscosity means it will burn just as well once ignited.
The higher SG means you will get more heat per litre from the black gasoil.

Conclusions, on paper black gasoil is as good and possibly a bit better fuel than diesel. The final test is of course how well and reliably it burns in a real world situation. At least two members have already begun to assemble their 3 tank black gasoil systems so we should have some interesting results by the end of this winter.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thierry, having done a bit of research, brake fluid is glycol-ether so is not a fuel at all. Glycol ether is very hygroscopic, is attracted to water, so should in theory settle to the bottom of an upflow tank along with water and sludge. However there would have to be some water present in the oil for that to happen.
My solution to your brake fluid problem would be to mist the surface of the 200 litres of contaminated oil with 1 litre of water and then process the oil through an upflow system. I have shown the construction of a simple compact upflow tank on the thread called "Heating with Alternative fuels" and also a larger capacity system with filtration here on this thread.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi John, thank you for your reply.
I am currently considering replacing my propane bottle oil stove with a conventional boiler with a riello burner and burning a mixture of kero/WMO mentioned above by you. I must say I am getting a bit fed up having to constantly keep on eye on the oil stove, having to clean it every day is also a messy business and re-lighting it takes a good bit of attention due to fuel changeovers and having to keep a close eye on it for a while after switching to wmo.It is also becoming less practical to use as I am finding myself spending less time at home than i used to (new girl friend Smile Yippie).
Lately i've been using my original heating system (geothermal) more often than not as it is much more practical and easy to manage.
I'm not sure if i'll get cracking on the conventional boiler with kero/wmo this winter, but when i do i'll be making the 3 barrels system that you have designed above and i'll then be able to clean the oil from the brake fluid.
Thanks again for all your inputs here on this site. I read everyone of your posts, as well as everyone else's, it makes for great learning.
All the best
 
Location: Galway | Registered: January 23, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I have to say Im quite excited about my Black Gasoil project, I and several others have already started to put together the system for preparing the WMO and I hope to have a burner running on it shortly after Christmas.
It has particular appeal for me as I am making my own synthetic kerosene from waste plastic but even with bought kerosene the saving is considerable.

To be able to make Black Gasoil correctly and consistently we need to be able to carry out 3 tests...
Viscosity test
Flash point test
Specific gravity
Specific gravity is the easiest. Simply weigh one litre of the fuel. it helps to have a good graduated cylinder to measure one litre accurately but not absolutely necessary.
I will offer a simplified viscosity test in the next post but in the meantime here is a video on how to to a flash point test.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_nVhkvPEpI
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nice video explaining flash points.
I never realised how easy it was to test for flash point.
Just read up on it,I Take it this is the 'open cup' version of testing?

Wikipedia says the flash point of kerosene is between 37 and 65c, which is a good 20 degree of a difference.

wiki flash points

Nice thermometer,It looks familiar Wink
 
Location: County down, Northern Ireland | Registered: August 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Another great video john thanks for sharing! I'm putting a falling ball viscometer together at the minute and was going to contact you about how to do the flash point test so thanks for thinking ahead Smile Have you done any viscosity testing on the black gasoil at lower temperatures? If it turns out it needs heating to keep it at the right viscosity at lower temperatures could the ratio of wmo be upped by heating the fuel tank to a higher temperature?
 
Registered: September 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Trigger, There is a range of flash points allowed for kerosene but the oil companies like to keep it low around 40°C so that it makes for easy cold starts. 38 - 45°C would be normal. My method is based on the open cup test.

Womble hold off on your falling ball viscometer. I will post tomorrow a much simpler way to test for viscosity of dark coloured liquids. Keeping black gasoil warm would allow a lower proportion of kerosene, provided the flash point and SG stayed within acceptable limits. The SG would not be a problem but at a certain point the flash point of the mixture might be too high. its a matter of try it and see.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Viscosity is the most important specification when testing black gasoil or any other fuel that must be forced through a jet to produce a spray.
Flash point is the second and SG is a distant third most important.

The burners we are going to use are designed to burn gasoil/green diesel so this will be our reference fuel. There is no need for us to be able to measure viscosity in centistokes or saybolt seconds( whatever they are). We just need to know if our fuel matches gasoil/green diesel, this simple test allows us to do that.

Apparatus. Take a 2 litre PET drinks bottle and make a very small hole with a hot pin about an inch from the bottom. Stick a piece of masking tape to the bottle and make a mark about an inch above the hole and another about six inches above that. Place the bottle in a dish or tray to catch any liquid. You will need a stopwatch, most mobile phones have one.

Method. With your finger over the hole fill the bottle with gasoil/green diesel to above the upper mark. Remove your finger and start your stopwatch when the level falls to the first mark. Measure the time it takes to fall to the second mark.
Now empty out the bottle and repeat the test with your wmo/kerosene mix.
In my tester it takes 122 seconds for gasoil/green diesel and 128 for black gasoil ( both at 12°C). This is within 5% so is acceptable.

www.imakebiodiesel.webs.com
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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As several people are making up black gasoil units it might be useful to sort out a way of describing the mix accurately so that everyone knows what we mean. I would suggest that we add K-- after the words black gasoil so if it was 55% wmo and 45% kerosene then it would be called black gasoil K45. ( or even just BG.K45 )I think this might save a lot of confusion later.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: imakebiodiesel,
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I've been doing some experiments myself with mixtures of WVO and kerosene. I used my own not so scientific method to measure the viscosity of the liquids. I used a soup ladle with a small hole drilled in the centre of the base of it. After immersing the ladle in a jug of the liquid, I would withdraw the ladle and measure how long it took for the liquid to drain from the ladle. It actually worked ok and I got consistent results. I took 3 measurements for each liquid and then averaged but each measurement was either the same or just 1 second out. Below were my findings.

Temperature 10C:
100% WVO 118secs
100% kero 50secs
100% bio 56secs
WVO/kero 60/40 61secs
WVO/kero 70/30 69secs

Temperature 50C:
WVO/kero 60/40 52 secs
WVO/kero 70/30 54secs

I am currently running my riello rdb burner on 100% bio and have done so for over a year now. I tried it on the WVO/kero 60/40 mix at 10C for the last few days and its been running perfectly, that's on the settings I had for the 100% bio.

I think from the findings above I might try the WVO/kero 70/30 mix at 50C, I would have to set up some kind of heated supply tank and also find a practical way of melting and then filtering the solids I intend using but it looks like it would be worth it.
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: May 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think your method of measuring viscosity is perfectly sound, in fact there are ladles called Kahn cups sold for measuring the viscosity of paints. The problem is with very free flowing liquids you need a bigger ladle. A ladle 5 or 6 times the size will expand the difference in the readings.

Simply mixing the wvo and kero is a lot less hassle than making biodiesel and should work just as well for heating oil. A big advantage is that combined with a heater you can use yellow grease.

Keep in mind that kerosene is not the only option. I advertised locally for contaminated fuel, I have collected 170 litres this week, 120 litres of a diesel/petrol mixture from a recovery service and 50 litres of filthy laundered fuel drained from a car with a wrecked injection system. these are both fine for blending into waste oils to produce a usable heating oil.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by imakebiodiesel:
Simply mixing the wvo and kero is a lot less hassle than making biodiesel and should work just as well for heating oil. .


Isn't kerosene and home heating oil the same thing or very similar?
 
Location: County down, Northern Ireland | Registered: August 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Trigger, down here home heating oil is either kerosene or diesel, I presume it's the same up there.
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: May 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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All burners are capable of running on either KEROSENE ( also called light oil or 28 sec oil) or DIESEL ( also called heavy oil or GASOIL or 32 sec oil or green diesel or red diesel in Northern Ireland or agricultural diesel)
Kerosene is favoured in most household heating systems because of issues such as reliability, clean burn, low odour etc. Most industrial and commercial installations use gasoil because of the lower cost.
What we are proposing here is to blend waste oil (either wmo or wvo) with sufficient kerosene to make it match the viscosity of gasoil and burn it in a standard Riello burner set to run on gasoil.

I refer to this new fuel as Black Gasoil. I prefer not to use the term diesel because I dont want to give the impression that this can be used in vehicles. It would be both illegal and harmful to the engine.

Deans viscometer idea with the ladle is a good one and would be much less messy in every day use than my PET bottle viscometer. I made one up this morning from a baked bean can. I started by gently hammering the bottom until it had a dished shape and made a small hole in the bottom. I rivetted a handle onto it and tried it out. It took about 100 seconds to drain cold green diesel which is a good range.
Im now going to test green diesel at a range of temperatures.
Im also going to finish my Black Gasoil outfit and I will post some pics.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Using the Moriarty ladle took readings at various temperatures for both green diesel and kerosene and plotted them on a graph. here are the results.


As you can see the graphs are fairly consistent. Interestingly diesel increased in viscosity more than kerosene as it approached zero.

The value of the Moriarty Ladle and the chart is that it allows me to check the viscosity of my Black Gasoil quickly and easily and at any temperature.
I just note the temp of the black gasoil and the time it takes to empty the ladle, trace the point on the graph and if it is within the green band its ok.
If its to the left of the green band I add some more WMO, if its to the right I add more kerosene.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Here are some pictures of the viscosity setup using a modified version of Deans ladle idea which I have dubbed Moriartys Ladle. I used a larger tin can to hold the fuel while heating up. The ladle is made from a baked bean can.

 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
I advertised locally for contaminated fuel, I have collected 170 litres this week, 120 litres of a diesel/petrol mixture from a recovery service and 50 litres of filthy laundered fuel drained from a car with a wrecked injection system. these are both fine for blending into waste oils to produce a usable heating oil.

Be cautious of the amount of petrol in the burner fuel mix. The volatile components in the petrol fraction will vaporize out of the mix when warmed and could present an explosive hazard indoors.

My truck however, is very tolerant of petrol in the fuel mix, and especially likes it in the winter, so I use any recovered fuel which might contain petrol or naphtha for motor fuel mix.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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