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Biodiesel from lard.
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IMB,
It's a good job your Southern Irish days are 30 hours long,how on earth do you get through everything you do and still manage time for a holiday.
PS Make sure you wash the wifes coffee filter out of all those HMPE's before she notices!
 
Location: YORK UK | Registered: April 27, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Easy answer to that question, dont watch television, and you will have lots of time for hobbies and projects. However I think Ill just climb down off my high horse and say goodnight.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Heres a diesel enfield that has come up for sale, thought you might be interested

http://biodiesel.infopop.cc/ev...337030973#6337030973
 
Registered: September 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ill probably stick to the 2CV engine to begin with but you never know a Royal Enfield might be an option eventually.

Ive tried a new approach to the fractionating that seems to be working. Each morning when the tallow bio is at its coolest I pour the whole bucket through a nylon jelly bag. I dont know what mesh size this is but the holes look like about 0.5mm. The bio runs through it quite quickly and leaves most but not all the hmpes in the bag.
The jelly bag removes all the larger crystals but lets smaller crystals through. These then form seed crystals for larger crystals to grow.
As you can see the hmpes collected are very firm, the spoon stays upright when stuck into it.
Ive processed down to 12°C and have a yield of about 75% liquid.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: imakebiodiesel,
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes DGS I can confifm that a dull 15'C litre of biodiesel is transformed to a sparkling 20'C ready to use when filtered through a kitchen paper cloth.
I have been at the silage harvest and so havn'nt been able to get much done with biodiesel

To summarise what Wesleyb and IMB are working at;
When the glycerine is separated from the crude biodiesel it is clear at 17'C and back to lard at 15'C'.
So to to improve on this and to get it down to clear at 10'C the hmpes have to be filtered out; if it is cold filtered it has to be done slowly; if done abruptly it is no good.
Hmpes are like seeds and once they have formed they cause others to form.
When you have gone as far as filtering hmpes out can take you; then you can improve the cold-flow of the biodiesel further by adding Kerosene or Diesel.
Surely it is possible to improve on the initial crude biodiesel (clear@17'C Lard@15'C ) by getting the ingredients and mixing in right proportions;
I read where Girlmark regrularly made biodiesel from lard and it was clear at 4'C ; unfortunately she didn;t give a detailed account of how she did it.
 
Location: Ireland | Registered: March 14, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have finished my first complete cycle of fractional crystallization. I wasted a lot of time with the initial stages and got delayed by trying to go too fast but now its done. Ive processed down to 10°C and have about 60% liquid fuel. Krishnamurthy and Kellen did much better, 0°C at 65% liquid fuel, but this is my first time and it is a process that requires a certain amount of trial and error.

The next stage is to mix that liquid and the hmpes back to together, warm them up to 40°C , mix in 25% diesel and repeat the process.

"A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new."
Albert Einstein
www.imakebiodiesel.webs.com

This message has been edited. Last edited by: imakebiodiesel,
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Ive finished the second round of fractional crystallization ( lets call this FC for convenience). The 25% diesel made a huge difference. This time used a faster timetable. Beginning at 30°C I settled for 12 hours and then filtered. I then turned down the temperature 5 degrees, settled for 12 hours, filtered and so on.
I got no hmpes in the filter at the 30, 25 or 20° stages, I got a very small amount from the 15°C stage and what looks like about 4 teaspoonsfull from the 10C stage.
The B75 mixture behaves very differently. At each stage the hmpes settle very quickly to the bottom of the bucket. The entrainment problem experienced with the B100 simply disappeared.
The only gripe I have about this method is having to put up with the horrible smell of warm dinodiesel.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I weighed the total hmpes removed and it came to 5% of the tallow biodiesel (not including the petrodiesel). The blending of a solvent such as diesel or kerosene is definitely the way to go. Its much more efficient and less troublesome than trying to process Tallow B100.

I feel ready to scale up. Ive been promising my self a new processor for over a year now, my current 8 year old one works perfectly but its looking a bit scruffy for showing to potential customers. So after I get back from holidays I going to build a new one with some modifications that will enable me to process both liquid oils and solid fats. This will take the FC process down to ambient. Ill then construct a simple refrigerated tank to continue the process down to winter temperatures.

I have to say that this tallow biodiesel is the best looking biodiesel Ive ever made, crystal clear, a very pale colour, in fact exactly the same colour as Lsd, the B75 has a specific gravity of .860.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: imakebiodiesel,
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The new IMB150FC processor build is going well. Essentially it is identical to my standard processor but has a belt heater as well as an immersion heater, a large diameter drain for removing HMPEs and a FC filter unit on top.
I was held up for a couple of weeks waiting for a 1000w heating belt from China. Its installed now and works fine.
Ive been doing another small 5 litre batch and experimenting with filters. I bought some sock filters that are used by dairy farmers to filter milk and they work perfectly. They catch all the visible crystals and the liquid filters through very quickly. A box of 100 of these filters (4" by 24") costs only €32.
Eventually when this system is thoroughly tested I will be offering IMB150FC processors for sale but for anyone who already has an IMB150 and wants to upgrade it, I will offer a free download of a step by step upgrade manual. This upgrade could be completed in about 2 days and will cost about €150 in parts.

"A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new."
Albert Einstein
www.imakebiodiesel.webs.com

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Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In a clear glass storage bottle I've got 1 centimeter of crystals on the bottom with 12 centimeters of transparent colorless liquid above the crystals at about 25 degrees centigrade. The storage bottle is about 1 litre and it is about 4/5ths full. So, the higher melting fatty acid methyl esters must be good for something, like undergoing pyrolysis to produce a useful product. This was biodiesel made from swine lard.
 
Location: Texas | Registered: April 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Pyrolizing HMPEs is probably more trouble than its worth. I have pyrolized lard and the bio oil it produces has only slightly more calorific value than the lard despite the high amounts of energy used to produce it.
The HMPEs have plenty of uses without modification.
If stored in a heated tank along with 20% kerosene they make an excellent heating fuel. This mix is suitable for use with a standard kerosene/diesel burner used throughout Ireland for home heating.
If heated and mixed with waste wood shavings/sawdust it can be made into firelogs. Once packaged these sell in supermarkets here for about €2 - 3 each
The food processing industry is required to use non toxic, non mineral oil lubricants in machinery that contacts foodstuffs. HMPEs could well fit that bill.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was trying suggest a way to make synthetic gasoline and kerosene. High octane gasoline fuel. That might be a higher cash value material. But it might not be cost effective even if it works. Now I don't have the right type of equipment to do it myself.
 
Location: Texas | Registered: April 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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If you heat the HMPEs to about 425°C and pass the vapours over a hot zeolite catalyst they will crack into kerosene type (C10 - C15) and naphtha type (C5 - C10) fractions. Naphtha is equivalent to low octane gasoline and will require further processing to make a high octane gasoline. This video shows it being done on a lab scale, they use pumice as a catalyst which is not so effective but good for a demonstration.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYyKUePdC2Y

Another use for hmpes is for Phase Change Heat Storage. Hot water from a solar panel is piped through a container of solid hmpes and causes it to melt. Later the heat stored in the hmpes is recovered by piping cold water through the container. As it solidifies the waxes release up to 14 times the amount of heat a similar sized water storage system could store.
I have some journal articles I could send you on the subject if you are interested.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: imakebiodiesel,
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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With the unusually warm summer that we have had my work on biodiesel from lard has been put on hold. We have a few chilly nights so I may start again soon. My new processor has a couple of modifications to help deal with lard.
In the picture below you can see the 1000w belt heater fitted near the bottom of the tank. Its very effective and heats 150 litres of oil at a rate of 15°C per hour. This will be useful both at the beginning when melting solid fats and at the end when doing fractional crystalization. The large outlet fitted to the bottom of the tank allows hmpes to be drained for filtration and is also very useful for draining pretreatment glycerol.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Brrr, Its was a chilly 2.5°C in my workshop this morning, and my samples of tallobio that have been beautifully clear all summer are looking cloudy and one has a layer of hmpes in the bottom. Time to get filtering again. My target this winter is to produce at least one full sized 150 litre batch of tallobio with a cloudpoint of 0°C.
Ive also come up with a novel way of dealing with the hmpes. The paper dairy filters Im using are 24" long by 4" wide and cost 22cents. I stuff them with clean wood shavings and filter the bio through them. This way I am reducing the soap content and removing the hmpes at the same time. When the filter is full I tie the neck of the bag and burn the whole thing in my wood stove. A single bag burns for over an hour.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I do something similar to remove the HMPE's from all my winter bio. I use a keg fridge and an upflow chip drum at-3C t to filter them out. It works excellent, I have not plugged a filter nor had any snowflakes in the tank whatsoever with this treatment and last winter we went several weeks where it was -20C or below.. Brrr...
I documented it here:
http://biodiesel.infopop.cc/ev...447097643#6447097643
The link with the pictures is down so here are a couple:
Here is the top of the drum, I used a standard bulk head fitting on the lid. The 3/8" tube is the feed tube, it goes through the 1/2" fitting and there is a 3/8" plastic tube that goes to the bottom of the drum. The fuel comes out through the 1/2" fitting where it drips through a 5 micron bag filter into my finished fuel drum.

I got this metering pump off ebay for 60 bucks, it works excellent at powering the chip filter.


Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jon That is a fantastic outfit and very similar to what I planned to use. What rate of flow can you achieve with this setup?
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I keep it very slow as the drum of chips makes a great insulator. Also the band clamp on the lid of the drum will leak if the pressure gets above 2PSI. It takes very little pressure from the pump to run it, I believe one of those solenoid type fuel pumps like this http://www.princessauto.com/pa...-Fuel-Pump/8144354.p would also work great for an upflow setup.
I have never really calculated the flow but I would say it takes about 7 days running 24 hours a day to filter a 1200L tote of settled fuel.
Its easy to see if it s running too fast as you will start to see HMPE's collecting in the 5 micron filter bag as well as collecting at the end of the pipe feeding into the filter bag when its running to fast. Once I get the chip drum primed with fuel I leave it sit in the fridge for 3 or 4 days before I start the pump, this ensures that the entire drum is down to temp.
I believe its important to make it upflow too, that way the warm fuel enters the bottom of the drum and should help to feed up through the chips as heat rises, also most of the HMPE's stay in the lower portion of the drum.
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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