BIODIESEL & SVO DISCUSSION FORUMS





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Currently driving a 09 Octavia....It says on fuel filler "no biodiesel"...dare say this only covers their ass for warranty and things....Suppose i will have to get an older car to run it Pre 90 or so seems to be best...Might get a runaround for cheap
 
Location: Dublin Ireland | Registered: January 19, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This thread is a great idea, we could use more information about how various car and vans run on biodiesel.
This is what I tell my customers...
Any engine with an inline injection pump B100
Any engine with an rotary injection pump made by Bosch B100 is ok.
Any engine with a rotary injection pump made by any other manufacturer, Lucas, Delphi etc, B80.
Any engine with a PD or common rail injection system B50
Any engine with a DPF (diesel particulate filter) no biodiesel.
I know that this is being very cautious, my own Skoda has a Lucas rotary pump and Ive done over 100,000 miles on B100 with no problems.
Copper 12 and others are running recent common rail engines on B100 with out any problems but I would have to point out that his biodiesel is very high quality with very low water and soap content.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I drive a 96 citroen Xantia 1.9 turbo diesel(xud)engine with bosh pump on B100 (whenever I can)

imake-That's a handy wee bit of advice that answers a lot of concerns that most people have about using Biodiesel on modern engines.

I'd be interested in hearing what others are driving(especially if its a modern engine) and what percentage Biodiesel you are using. . .
 
Location: County down, Northern Ireland | Registered: August 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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i run a 01 volvo lorry on bio, just cant get enough oil to run B100 all the time, engine sounds much sweeter on bio, more muffled on dino, its pretty bulletproof, lorry engines are designed to work hard all day every day, some commerically available bio is pure rubbish (i sent sample to IMB) which is giving bio a bad name
 
Location: meath/ cavan | Registered: April 17, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I run a 2001 Citroen Xsara HDi, and a 2002 VW TRansporter T4, both on B100. I'd say my fuel is good, with low (<40ppm) soap, and water, though still not testing for water.


2001 Citroen Xsara
2002 VW T4 Transporter
on B100
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: December 16, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I drive an 04 Citroen Berlingo HDI and a 00 Suzuki grand vitara both on B100, 6000 miles done in the Citroen and 2000 on the Suzuki.
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: May 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I'm not much into engines so maybe some of you guys out there can enlighten me on my lot here, 03 Fiat Ducato 2.3 TD, 06 Peugot Expert I think 1.9 turbo engine and 06 Hyundai Sonato 2.0 TD. B100 only in the Peugot so far, the Fiat is going to get B100 today and the missus is saying no chance that brew in her "good " car.......................what'd ye think lads............Also my oil boiler on B100....Riello 3G burner........had a little tinkering around to do with oil pressure settings and nozzle choice but appears to be going well now on .5 Hollow 80degree Danfoss nozzle 125psi and 1.5 air damper setting. Going to run the flue gas analyser on it today to see the efficiency and co and co2 readings.
 
Location: Longford | Registered: October 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I dont know enough about those models to tell you what kind of injection system they use but a mechanic should be able to tell you. Fiat invented the common rail system but then sold the design to Bosch so some early Fiat engines are in fact common rail. In that case I would go for B50 at first.
Anyone driving a modern high pressure diesel on biodiesel really should have a carbide manometer so that they can test the water content of every batch they make. A mistake could be very costly and the test outfit is cheap and easy to use. www.make-biodiesel.org has a very good article on making and using a carbide manometer.
It will be interesting to see the CO and CO2 readings on a burner run on biodiesel, your settings sound right from my memory of doing it 3 years ago.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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imb,

I would be very interested in hearing more about your experiences related to why you believe B50 is the safe limit for PD or common rail injection system. Do you believe the high fuel temp. and pressure may cause the blended fuel to breakdown? Thanks! Still love the manometer use it 2x a month!
 
Registered: September 24, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was talking to a man on Friday that ran a 05 vw polo and a 09 Mercedes on B100 !!

Heres what I think..
Imake sums it up very nicely as a general rule,because a lot of the time asking someone "can my car run on biodiesel is like asking what length is a piece of string and depends mostly on the quality of biodiesel your using.(soap,water,conversion etc)

Of course it never used to be like this,
Before early 2000 pretty much any diesel car was a 'sure thing' that ran beautifully on low quality Biodiesel and anything else for that matter(my 96 citroen is currently running on 80% vegetable oil cos I ran out of Biodiesel)

After early 2000 things get a bit sketchy as the common rail engine became more popular with a lot of conflicting reports about what can and cannot run on Biodiesel.
(Mercedes first starting using common rail as early as 97 with the C 220 CDI)
The reason was because home made bio varied in degrees of quality depending who made it.
Since then high pressure injectors,electronics,sensors and all the rest of the stuff they've introduced in the name of fuel efficiently and less pollution has made these engines very intolerant to low spec fuel and in my opinion less robust.

This means that the fuel we use has to be top spec - be that bio or pump diesel,
The last time I was speaking with Imake he told me that some of the latest vag group engines were that intolerant that even some garage diesel may not be high enough quality for them.

Bottom line is if you want to run a modern diesel , make sure you fuels is up to spec, which it was'nt a few years back for most of us but thanks to people like imake with his invention of the manometer and different conversion tests our fuel is much better.

In fact its not just better but exceeds most ASTM/EN standards !!!
 
Location: County down, Northern Ireland | Registered: August 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Good post there Trigger. I note that on the UK version of this site there is very little traffic and discussion on various issues. In comparison we Irish are very active whether its our natural instinct for chat or quest for knowledge or both I'm not sure but its post's like trigger's and Imakes and other's which is driving up the quality of the product we are making. It's because of people like this that we are in a position to produce first class fuel which is vital in these modern high effeciency engines. The test's for quality, soap and water are the three main tools at our disposal to ensure that we maintain those standards and therefore continue to flourish.

Going forward the cost of fuel is only going one way so its important that we continue to make contributions to this forum, educate and share knowledge and experience's thereby increasing and expanding our information and learning so as we have less dependency on fossil fuels.
 
Location: Longford | Registered: October 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Maxoilburner, I think that Trigger has answered your question very eloquently. My recommendation of B50 for high pressure diesels is arguably cautious. I know a number of people running them on B100 with no problem at all. But all of them are experienced home brewers making top quality fuel. On an open forum like this you cant be sure everyone is on the same level of skill and expertise.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Be very careful of Diesel particulate filters, I had to a bit of digging to make sure the parents 05 passat was O.K, this was the year they started fitting them. They are a bloody nuisance as they can't be removed easily.


My 2000 passat is a PD, this is rare for this age I believe but runs fantastic on dry B100.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: BNG,
 
Location: Cork | Registered: December 05, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have looked into the problem of dpfs. There seem to be a lot of solutions on offer, from quick and dirty, like punching a hole through the filter element to a full removal and remap.
I have provided a link here to a post in a VAG owners club forum showing in detail what is involved in a proper removal. The remapping people chippedire.com that he mentions seem to know what they are talking about.
http://vagdrivers.net/forums/i....php?showtopic=36914
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi IMB pm sent, check your inbox.
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: May 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Posted January 29, 2012 05:22 PM Hide Post
Be very careful of Diesel particulate filters, I had to a bit of digging to make sure the parents 05 passat was O.K, this was the year they started fitting them. They are a bloody nuisance as they can't be removed easily.


My 2000 passat is a PD, this is rare for this age I believe but runs fantastic on dry B100.


Note the word DRY in the post above. This is crucial. 500 ppm, although within the legal spec to my mind is not dry enough. With the new Turbo Dryer I am using I can hit less than 100ppm every time. I will be posting full details on " drying biodiesel in a damp climate" soon.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I run a 03 VW T5 Transporter 1.9Tdi 104bhp on B50 to B100 No problems except slight drop in power and economy.
00 Saab 93Tid on varying strengths and it runs perfect.
1990 VW camper with a 1.9DG engine.
Runs fine but not used much, I expect seals to be a problem in time though.


2003 VW T5 1.9Tdi
2000 Saab 93 2.2Tid
1990 VW T25 camper 1.9D
All on B100
 
Registered: March 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A friend of mine recently contacted Chipped Ireland about having the DPF removed fron their car. They quoted 150 for the removal of the filter and 350 for a complete remap of the ecu. That seems like a fair price to me. Just remapping the engine could save that much in a year in better economy even without using biodiesel. Removing the filter and the sensors would probably take me a full day so 150 euro seems reasonable.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Folks, I just bought a 2000 Skoda Felicia pick up from my brother. It has a 1.9 diesel engine. Another brother owned it before him and used to run it on vegetable oil. He bought the oil in Aldi and poured it right in. Given the price of diesel I thought of doing the same and a little Googling took me here. I had a brief read of the forums and might give the biodiesel a shot. I am fairly handy with plumbing and electrical and need a new hobby. I see oil for sale on Donedeal and was wondering is it still worthwhile to make biodiesel or would you need to source it for free? I will read the forums in more detail but I get the impression sourcing oil is difficult.
 
Location: Longford | Registered: May 03, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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To be honest you would need to see it as kind of a hobby, most of us do I think. If you didn't it wouldn't be long before you got cheesed off, it's a messy business and there's a fair bit of work in it too. On the plus side it will give you an immense feeling of satisfaction when it works out. I also feel that if you're determined enough there's still plenty of free oil out there.
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: May 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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