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Propane bottle oil stove.
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Wow John, that stove looks great. happy days.
I've just posted on "best car", wouldn't mind if you could take a look please.
Thanks.
 
Location: Galway | Registered: January 23, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great job John,very versatile indeed!
Your right see8ng the flames adds a great atmosphere Well done
 
Location: County down, Northern Ireland | Registered: August 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Got a bit of time over Christmas and wrote the sketch ( Arduino's word for a program) to control a 12v fuel pump with an Arduino uno microprocessor.
This will feed the burner extra fuel while it is starting up and then regulate the temperature once the burner reaches normal running.
The sketch is set to be used with my Ozzirt workshop burner but can be adjusted to suit any other type.
Here is the sketch. If you download the free software from the Arduino website, you can copy and paste this sketch directly into it and use it yourself. Over the next few days Ill post a circuit diagram and more information on how to edit the sketch to suit your own burner.


// Project .. Fuel supply pump controller.
// by John ONeill 25/12/2014 and published under a creative commons licence.
// Feel free to use or modify this sketch.


float voltage = 0;
float celsius = 0;
float sensor = 0;

float hotTemp = 100; //adjustable temp above which "interval" increases.
float coldTemp = 80; //adjustable temp below which "interval" decreases.

int pulse = 2000; //adjustable time the pump is on in milliseconds
int interval = 20000; //adjustable time between pulses in milliseconds
int adjust = 5000; //the time that the sketch will increase or decrease the interval.



void setup()
{
pinMode (13, OUTPUT); //sets pin 13 to out, on board LED will light on pin 13.
}


void loop ()
{
//read the temp sensor and convert to degrees C
sensor = analogRead(0);
voltage = (sensor*5000) / 1024; //convert raw value to millivolts
voltage = voltage - 500; //remove voltage offset
celsius = voltage/10; //convert millivolts to celsius

if (celsius <= coldTemp)
{
digitalWrite (13, HIGH);
delay (pulse);
digitalWrite (13, LOW);
delay (interval - adjust); //shorter interval increases temp.
}

else if (celsius > coldTemp && celsius <=hotTemp)
{
digitalWrite (13, HIGH);
delay (pulse);
digitalWrite (13,LOW);
delay (interval);
}

else //celsius is > hotTemp
{
digitalWrite (13,HIGH);
delay(pulse);
digitalWrite (13,LOW);
delay (interval + adjust); // longer interval lowers temp
}
}
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here is the basic circuit diagram for the pump.

As you can see you will need an Arduino Uno R3, A TMP36 temperature sensor, a 5v relay and some wires to connect them. Soldered connections are best, less prone to bad connections.
In the UK or Ireland you can buy these from Hobby electronics here http://www.hobbytronics.co.uk/relay-5v-spdt . There are lots of places in the US.
Ill post more info about how to use the various parts tomorrow.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You may have noticed that I have included a thermostat in the circuit diagram. I could have included a few lines in the sketch that would act as a high limit thermostat but Murphys Law tells us that "if something CAN go wrong then it WILL go wrong" so I have included a separate mechanical thermostat that will switch off the pump if the temperature exceeds 150°C. These are cheap, simple and utterly reliable.
http://ie.rs-online.com/web/p/thermostats/0339724A/
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi all happy new year, just been reading up on the forum, missed a lot over the last year!,so busy

A friend of mine is interested in a multi fuel burner which may burn a small amount of house hold waste, wood and waste motor oil of which he has plenty.

The design you have IMAKE looks excellent, do you think a small boiler/water jacket could be added?
 
Location: Cork | Registered: December 05, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I have been experimenting with water heating with limited success, I find that the Ozzirt burner is very dependent on the flue temperature so if you extract too much heat from the flue gas it simply wont burn cleanly. At best a coil in the upper chamber would heat water for household use and perhaps 2 radiators but not enough to heat a whole house system.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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To install the controller find a spot on your flue pipe where the temperature is about 90°C when the stove/ heater is running normally. Attach the TMP36 there using silcone repair tape making sure the wires dont short on the metal flue. The TMP36 only measures up to 125°C so dont install it anywhere too hot. For hotter applications I can modify the sketch to use a K type probe, good for up to 1300°C.

To adjust the sketch to suit your own setup simply edit the sketch as you would a word document. Save a copy of the original sketch before you start so that you can return to it if anything goes wrong with your adjustment.
The following 5 variables can be changed.
"hotTemp" the threshold above which the fuel flow is reduced (default value 100°C)

"coldTemp" the threshold below which the fuel flow is increased. (default value 80°C)

"pulse" the no of milliseconds the fuel is pumped. ( default value 2000)

"interval" the no of milliseconds between pulses ( default value 20000)

"adjust" the amount the interval is changed above and below the thresholds. (default value 5000)

Be careful not to change anything else. Verify the sketch to make sure you havnt done any thing wrong and then up load it to your Arduino Uno. The Arduino will save that sketch and run it every time you switch it on.
I wont go into how to set up and connect the Arduino, there is lots of good information and tutorials available online especially on the Arduino website, but if anyone needs help pm me and Ill be happy to advise.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm definately going to have to put learning about Arduino's on the to do list for the new year. Maybe I can just go buy some sort of kit and sus it out from there? I'll need something to put my greasy ( or oily ) mitts on to get it to sink in.


I have also tried water heating with the updraft design. I hesitate to call it the Ozzirt type because it's actually a russian design that was well illustrated well before the Aussie bloke made it popular in the west. It's also very popular in asian countries and both the Russkies and the Asians have a whole load of really interesting variations on it.

I too found it was neigh impossible to get a clean burn with non forced air designs. You can give them all the secondary air you like but they still condense soot and basicaly insulate the heat from the water jacket and become hopelessly inefficent.

I gave my forced air burner another run the other day in a gas water heater and it ran perfectly clean once I " tuned" the air and oil for the output I wanted and even took the built up soot off the internal baffle/ heat spreader that goes in the center of the heater.

I got 100L of water to a Boil in just over 30 Min and could have probably done it faster. I did a vid with heat rise measurements on it but haven't edited it as yet.
An earlier vid I did of the setup when I first tested it is here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...dKGemqGDvpn2hSuJl2Nw

The thing with forced air burners is you can set them to have a reducing or lean flame that has an oxygen excess and therefore runs purely clean with all products combusted. I see a lot of heater vids with oil burners, even forced air types, where they operator talks about cleaning them out. I never have to clean mine, they pretty much self clean. Some will get some buildup but it tends to stay at a constant and insignificant level. My "vaporising" burners run totally clean. There isn't even Soot in the thing when I shot them down because of the heat they run at and the excess air.
Carbon burns off at 600oC and/ or with flame and enough oxygen to let it burn like charcoal.

In a forced air type, if you are getting carbon buildup on any surface, hot or cold, you are simply running too rich.

The other thing with the forced air type is you can set the heat output to what you want. You can of course regulate the output of a draft burner by the primary air ( actually fuel delivery is a very secondary concern to output) but you can't really ajust the flame to be reducing or oxidising in a practical manner.

The addition of a small blower that uses next to no power ( the one in my vid is 12V from a car) opens up a whole greater range of output and flame type that is much more practical for a lot of things, especially water heating where you have a cold surface that won't get hot enough to allow the carbon to burn off. With a forced air type burner you can set it to a reducing flame so there is never any buildup formed in the first place.

A micro computer controlled forced air burner would have a huge application for home heating where it could be made to look after itself and throttle up or down as needed. Even a full power/ Idle control would be more than good enough because until recently and still, that's how all central heating and AC worked anyway. Throttling is only a fairly new development.
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You are absolutely right about forced air burners being the best way to heat water. Any natural draft system will be compromised by the cooling effect. In fact the more efficient the heat exchanger the more the burner is compromised.
The ozzirt type burner is ideal for a simple space heater, I particularly like it for its simplicity and lack of noise.
You are also right that a natural draft burner cannot be made to burn lean, at best it will draw in exactly the correct amount of air for a neutral burn. However if a sufficiently high temperature can be maintained in the secondary tube, carbon buildup can be avoided. The top of my secondary tube glows a medium cherry red and measures 780°C on the outside. Ive also found that leaving the grate in place above the burner allows me to run the burner higher without smoke. It seems to act like the catalyser you find in some oil stoves.
If you want to get started in Arduino I can recommend two good books, Arduino Workshop by John Boxall and Arduino Cookbook by Micheal Margolis. Both assume you know nothing to start with and they jump straight into practical projects and you learn the theory as you go.
I wouldnt bother with any of these starter kits on offer, they are just a way of charging more for a lot of bits you dont need.
I would buy one of these books first, and then buy a genuine Arduino uno, plus the components required for the projects you want to build from the book.
Ive been learning for only a few months and maths would not be my strong point, but Ive so far built a digital dashboard ( RPM, temp and oil pressure)for my kitcar, A monitor for my heating system that sends a flue temp reading by radio signal to our bedroom and this Oil pump controller.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by imakebiodiesel:
If you want to get started in Arduino I can recommend two good books, Arduino Workshop by John Boxall and Arduino Cookbook by Micheal Margolis. Both assume you know nothing to start with and they jump straight into practical projects and you learn the theory as you go.
I wouldnt bother with any of these starter kits on offer, they are just a way of charging more for a lot of bits you dont need.
I would buy one of these books first, and then buy a genuine Arduino uno, plus the components required for the projects you want to build from the book.
Ive been learning for only a few months and maths would not be my strong point, but Ive so far built a digital dashboard ( RPM, temp and oil pressure)for my kitcar, A monitor for my heating system that sends a flue temp reading by radio signal to our bedroom and this Oil pump controller.


Thats a great help. Thank you very much for the heads up.
I knew a kit would be overpriced at least but sometimes you have to go that way when you don't know any better. I'll find the books and then get what I need.
I see ebay is full of all sorts of controllers and add ons for these things. They have been annoying sifting through them when I'm NOT looking for that stuff. Now they will be a lot more interesting.


I'm looking to get some tools, mainly a cutoff or band saw so I can make some updraft burners. I like the russian designs and they make multipurpose stove/ heater/ water heaters with the things and also retro fit standard wood burners by replacing the door with an external burner which is bloody clever and looks quite safe.

I want to do a heater which has a Cooking hotplate and a wetback for water burning. I want to test a design where the secondary air is foce assisted. This will be a small amount of air blown into the secondary air stage which will in turn draw more air in the secondary and primary stages and then force it onto a surface to be heated like a wetback or hotplate. I'll do it as a booster if you like so the thing can still run naturally or with some extra output that will help it burn totally clean.

The one thing that nags me with of 95% heaters is the fact people don't duct outdoor air in for the fire therefor creating a situation where cold air is sucked into the house, heated and goes up the flue and that People get rid of the flue gasses and so much heat asap and without trying to get that heat out and utilise it.

I know they can still work very well and it's not the end of the world with them but it's just one of those things that I think could be done a lot better to extract more heat instead of wasting it.... Even if the fuel is free.


Thanks again for the tips and advise!
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well I'm off and running... more or less.

I found an online PDF Of the arduino Workshop book and have been reading that. Scratched the surface of the basics but this is clearly something I'll be able to get my head around although I can see I will also cause myself no end of frustration when Building things.

I have looked on Fleabay and there are several starter kits available and I think I'll get one. For $40 you get the board, wires and a bunch of other stuff that I can use at least for playing around and learning on and for 40 bux it's not worth ordering stuff seperately. The servo motors and other things I can see I will probably use anyway.

So that's one NY res already started and I can see it will definately be one I will stick with. With the potential I can see in these things already and knowing what I'm like, I'll have the Cat equipped with a Micro Computer this time next year.

Thanks again for the help and suggestions.
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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You can never have too many jumperwires and an extra breadboard is useful too. Means you can continue to play with one project while you build another. A full selection pack of resistors is very handy and only costs a couple of euros.
Debugging sketches is usually easy as the Arduino software more or less tells you whats wrong. Debugging circuits can be frustrating. I once spent 2 days trying to get a circuit to work only to eventually find I had inserted a transistor the wrong way round, still its all part of the experience.
Good luck and keep us up to date with how you get on.
Perhaps when a few of us get up and running we might start a discussion of using Arduino to control burners and even automate biodiesel processes.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here is another inexpensive board that is easy to code for and has quite a bit more HP then the Adruino if any of you are interested.
What I love about it is you can use Qt to code for it...
http://www.raspberrypi.org/
Happy coding!
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Jon, Ive looked at the raspberry pi and it does seem to have some advantages over the arduino uno. Ive already committed a lot of time to learning to work with arduino so changing now wouldnt make sense for me, but anyone starting out should consider it. There are also larger faster versions of the arduino with more connections but at present I have no need for them.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Is the Raspberry not a computer linux type, as against the Arduino which has input and output devices? By no means an expert, but am relying on my son who is. Jim.
 
Location: Cape Town | Registered: May 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes I believe the Raspberry pi is in the true sense a mini computer with a linux based operating system. Im not sure exactly what the input/ output configuration is.
The arduino has no operating system. You write the program in C++ which is a human language ( see my sketch on the previous page)and the Arduino software on your main computer converts that to machine code and relays it to your Arduino. The arduino stores that one program and performs it everytime it is switched on until you replace it with a different program. The Arduino has multiple digital and analog inputs and outputs.
Jon could tell us more about the Raspberry pi as he is more familiar with it than I am.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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i have been using a ozzerts waste oil burner for a couple of years now in my coach. i am in the process of moving into a yurt,so needed something a bit different. the ultimate aim is a rocket mass heater but that will have to wait til the summer. for now i have a sort of hybrid between a RMH and a ozzerts. in the coach i just had the flue going though a hole in the aluminium roof.
cant do that in the yurt as years of experience have taught me that holes in roofs always leak. the roof cover is pvc as well so i went for a hole thought the wall instead. headroom is another thing i am short on as well. what i did was cut down a oil drum by around 18 inches and cut 2 holes in the bottom. one 5 inch for the burner tube and one 6 inch for the flue pipe. the burner sits on a tripod on a fire brick about 9 inches from the floor. the oil drum sits on a frame made from 22mm plumbing fittings, cheap and easy to adjust the height. this gives be about 2 foot to the roof. i covered the horizontal section of the flue with cob to act as a thermal store. hasn't quite dried out fully yet so not really working. but nice and warm to sit on but isn't holding any heat yet.
the oil feed is a peristaltic pump with a timer circuit so i can adjust the on time and the pause time. 3 secs on 15 secs off seems to work ok. this is much better than the needle valve which gets blocked very quickly on wmo. its fine on bio or kerosene but that gets expensive.

next thing is to add some safety devices. been brainstorming over on the vegoil forum which is what brings me here thanks to trigger mentioning the arduino controller. for now i am going to use a couple of thermal fuses and a thermostat to act as flame failure. very interested in making a user friendly version of the ozzerts burner for a friends house.
 
Location: cornwall uk | Registered: November 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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For some reason I missed the questions here...
IMB nailed it in his response, yes the pi is a mini computer, just hook up a screen and keyboard and mouse and SD card and you can code your routines right on the pi.
It is very flexible as far as coding, I use C++ or qml (Qt) but you can also use js, python, etc.
They are nice little units IMO.
Cheers,
Jon
 
Location: Wellington County, Ontario Canada | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Yubbayubba, sounds like a great project. Ultimately the rocket stove is the way to go if you want or must have horizontal flue runs. The ozzirt burner like to have a straight vertical flue.
http://biodiesel.infopop.cc/ev...823/m/7387087243/p/3
If you look here you can see a layout for safety cutouts on a burner that also heated a water boiler. It used capillary type thermostats but can be adapted to use fixed temp bimetallic thermostats as well.
The Arduino controller gives a lot of fine tunable control but I would not trust electronics as a last line of protection. A simple bimetallic thermostat fixed to the flue that cuts off the pump supply is simple and reliable.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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