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winter biodiesel!!!!
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Originally posted by john galt:
I live where it routinely gets extremely cold every winter. Our diesel engines start and run just fine in cold winter temperatures, it's not a problem here in Northern Canada and Alaska.
I recall reading somewhere that you are also using a plug in block heater to keep your engine warm, a plug in heating pad on your fuel filter and a plug in heating pad on your fuel injectors in addition to a Flat Plate Heat Exchanger to heat your fuel once the engine has started..
 
Location: Massport | Registered: April 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm using a plug-in lower rad hose heater to warm the 3.4L I4 TDI engine, a plug-in heating pad on the Flat Plate Heat Exchanger, and a plug-in heating pad [battery blanket] over the fuel injectors. The FPHE, fuel filter and injector lines are insulated. The plug-in heaters are on a timer that provides approximately 3 hrs preheat for every 10°C below freezing.
The FPHE heats the fuel once the engine has started.

Plug-in engine preheating is used on all vehicles here.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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With all that heating are you running B100?
If not B100 can you tell us what your cold weather fuel is.
 
Location: Massport | Registered: April 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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With all that heating are you running B100?

I could, but choose not to.

quote:
If not B100 can you tell us what your cold weather fuel is.

see bottom of page



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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does anyone else use anti gelling/waxing additives.did well last year but maybe it was luck.i want to keep the cost down to a minimum,mixing with 25%-50% kerosene would significantly increase the price of my fuel per litre,but maybe the safest way.can you mix your biodiesel with this much kerosene?
 
Registered: March 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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can you mix your biodiesel with this much kerosene?

I do it every winter. I don't use expensive kerosene, but instead use stove oil, jetA, or winter grade diesel fuel. They're all basically kerosene, with different additives for different end uses. Out-of-date jetA [jetA-1, JP8] is the least expensive, often free. Arctic stove oil is $1.29 per liter and winter grade ULSD is $1.31 per liter. Biodiesel costs about $0.75 per liter to make. All our fuel comes from Canadian wells, not countries that support terrorists. I don't have a problem with using petro fuel since it keeps fellow Canadians employed, a roof over their heads, and food on their table.

Everyone has specific local conditions and factors which will influence their choices.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Originally posted by john galt:
With all that heating are you running B100?
I could, but choose not to.

Ok. The way you were talking about using biodiesel in the cold I assumed you were talking from first hand experience. So you just mostly use petroleum fuels in the winter like everyone else.
 
Location: Massport | Registered: April 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You seem to assume that 'biodiesel' only means B100. The real world doesn't agree. Biodiesel is still biodiesel regardless of what else you mix with it. Now do you understand?



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I recommended reading the following article from biodiesel digest. If they consider B20 'biodiesel' then I'll go along with their definition rather than the opinion some person with no established credibility posting on an internet forum. N'est pas?

New world biodiesel land speed record set at Bonneville
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdig...d-set-at-bonneville/



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by daradec:
does anyone else use anti gelling/waxing additives.did well last year but maybe it was luck.i want to keep the cost down to a minimum,mixing with 25%-50% kerosene would significantly increase the price of my fuel per litre,but maybe the safest way.can you mix your biodiesel with this much kerosene?


My winter recipe is to add 5% -10% unleaded petrol to rapeseed based b100(canola).I start stockpiling the rapeseed for winter brewing,but our winter temps in the UK rarely go below -10c at night,and hover around 0c for daytime.We don't tend to see the really cold stuff you guys get over the pond.But as John G suggests,I keep a poly bottle of my brew outside to see what is going on-the bulk in the tank has more thermal mass and is a bit warmer
 
Location: UK | Registered: October 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My fuel mix is shown below. The summer mix has more biodiesel and VO, the winter mix has more ULSD, jetB and petrol.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
I recommended reading the following article from biodiesel digest. If they consider B20 'biodiesel' then I'll go along with their definition rather than the opinion some person with no established credibility posting on an internet forum. N'est pas?

New world biodiesel land speed record set at Bonneville
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdig...d-set-at-bonneville/
Your link does not work.
Having no established credibility, I am disappointed that you do not nominate the actual percent of biodiesel you use in your fuel in the winter.
I use 100% biodiesel year round. When I say 100% biodiesel I mean B100, not 80% D2 and 20% methyl esters.
 
Location: Massport | Registered: April 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdig...d-set-at-bonneville/

The percentages vary with temperature. If you can find page 1 of this discussion look at the graph I posted. It actually gets cold here, not like where you live. B100 would be a solid block of fuel in the tank between Halloween and Easter.

What part of
"Everyone has specific local conditions and factors which will influence their choices."
was difficult to grasp?



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Considering they are reporting a speed record in a category that does not exist, I do not think that website has any more credibility than I do.
quote:
The percentages vary with temperature. If you can find page 1 of this discussion look at the graph I posted. It actually gets cold here, not like where you live. B100 would be a solid block of fuel in the tank between Halloween and Easter.
Interesting chart. If that is the percent of biodiesel you use in the winter it appears you are using B0 or B1 most the time.
 
Location: Massport | Registered: April 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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ที่จะชอบเล่นซอให้ควายน้ำ

http://youtu.be/l3a5BsmxNJ0



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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is anyone in ireland or similar climate using b100 in the winter
 
Registered: March 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I use B100 for as much as possible during the winter. I keep a bottle of b100 near where I park my car and at the first sign of clouding I add 10% kerosene. Nightime temps reached a low of -12 degrees C last winter and I had no problems.
However bear in mind that not all B100 is the same, factors such as type of feedstock, fat content,percentage of conversion, water content etc all affect the cloud point.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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thanx john,great info
 
Registered: March 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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just made 500l of biodiesel which will last me till the end of november.took a few samples and it clouds at -0.5c and still pours at -3c(so i reckon would be good till around -1 to -2c).tried another sample with 2l of hiberna per 1000l of biodiesel mixed in.got the cloud point down to -4c and pour point was -11c,so i think this will be ok till end nov.if it gets colder i think i shall add kerosene aswell(easier to mix),thanx all for info
 
Registered: March 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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hi Daradec, that's interesting but the Hiberna only lowers the cloud point from -0.5C to -4C, that's only 3.5 deg, not great is it to be honest? Kerosene has to be a better option though, don't you think, especially if we get another winter like the last two, it'll be getting a lot colder than -4C. I would be edgy about adding the kerosene though, I know you are soupposed to be able to add up to 10% as a winterizing additive but I still think it'd raise a few eyebrows if you were dipped and I'd rather not draw those guys on me.
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: May 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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