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Drying biodiesel in a damp climate.
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Just trying to get up to date after a break of a couple of years.Will round up some wood shavings and a piece of wavin pipe also some silica gel.
regards vino
 
Location: IRELAND | Registered: April 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ive been doing some development work on my dryer to make it more efficient and would like to share the results with you all. The details of my original "turbo dryer" are shown a few pages back. The first and most important modification was to change the fan from blowing into the processor to sucking out. This means that only the air pump is drawing air through the desiccant and so the desiccant lasts far longer. So no need to change the silica get after 3 hours. Here is a diagram of the new configuration. You will be able to use the original pump,transformer,wiring, tub and fan. Just a new plywood or chipboard lid is required.
Another feature of the new dryer is that it can can be ducted to outside the workspace using tumble dryer hose.


www.imakebiodiesel.webs.com
www.polydiesel.webs.com

This message has been edited. Last edited by: imakebiodiesel,
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The next thing I worked on was the desiccant. I built a special dryer that had a built in humidity meter so that I could see how well the desiccant worked. The results were very clear. In all cases 200 gms of desiccant was used continuously for 6 hours.



The cat litter silica gel was very poor, it worked slowly and only reduced the moisture level in the air by a minimal amount.
Proper silica gel was much better. still relatively cheap and can be regenerated at 150C.
Activated alumina was also very good and the large particle size allowed very good airflow to the pump. A bit more expensive and must be regenerated at 220C.
Calcium chloride worked the best but it has some disadvantages. Because it gets wet when in operation the air must enter the bottom of the vessel and pass out through the top. It also tends to cake which makes it progressively hard to pump the air through it. It was the cheapest but cannot be regenerated.
It would be very good with a drying system if a powerful compressor was used.
On balance the best results with the new Mk 2 dryer were with narrow pore silica gel or activated alumina, easily achieving under 100 ppm of water in 6 hours.

I have purchased some stocks of the above desiccants and if anyone wants some contact me on 0863169230.
Indicating silica gel 10 euro per kilo plus 7.50 p&p
Activated alumina 15 euro per kilo plus 7.50 p&p
Calcium chloride 5 euro per kilo plus 7.50 p&p
3A molecular sieve 15 euro per kilo plus 7.50 p&p

www.imakebiodiesel.webs.com
www.polydiesel.webs.com

This message has been edited. Last edited by: imakebiodiesel,
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Brilliant work John!
I was going to make a replacement dryer soon.
Will look into this in the new year.
Appreciate you sharing your findings.
Many Thanks
 
Location: County down, Northern Ireland | Registered: August 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Excellent, IMB, great work. Thanks for sharing.


2001 Citroen Xsara
2002 VW T4 Transporter
on B100
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: December 16, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well done Imb love the fact it can be ducted to the outside too!
 
Registered: September 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Thank guys, bear in mind that when ducting the fans are not very powerful. About 2 metres of tumble dryer hose maximum. Arrange the hose so that any condensate does not drip back into the processor.

I did a batch at the weekend and dried it on Sunday. The moisture level in my workspace was 99%. I dried for six hours using 250 gms of activated alumina. Result 80ppm of water!
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you let your biodiesel settle so that the soaps fall to the bottom of drum,when drying with air pump is there not a chance that the air will agitate the soaps and mix it with the oil again?
 
Location: IRELAND | Registered: April 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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yes, if you are using heat and settle to remove soap, you should dry the bio first and then let it settle. The soaps will settle much faster when the bio is dried.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So after processing you would heat to drive off methanol,then dry and then let settle.
 
Location: IRELAND | Registered: April 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Exactly
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi all,

Been a busy 6 months not had time to make any BD

John I like the Mk2 and am going to put one together tomorrow.

Do you make it as air tight as possible apart from the two 20 mm holes or just rest it on the rubber seal on top of the processor.
 
Location: Cork | Registered: December 05, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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If you make it from 3/4 ply or chipboard it will be heavy enough to form a good seal by just sitting on the rubber seal of the processor. Yes you want the fan to draw air only through the 2 holes. that way the fan is always slightly starved of air and will snatch any extra air rising off the surface of the bio. You will know the fan is starved correctly if it speeds up when you lift the lid and break the seal. However if you make the holes any smaller the fan will overheat and will not last long.


I have purchased some stocks of desiccants and if anyone wants some contact me on 0863169230.
Indicating silica gel 10 euro per kilo plus 7.50 p&p ( regen temp 140C)
Activated alumina 15 euro per kilo plus 7.50 p&p ( regen temp 220C)
Calcium chloride 5 euro per kilo plus 7.50 p&p (for compressor driers only, no regen)
3A molecular sieve 15 euro per kilo plus 7.50 p&p ( regen temp 800C)

I did a batch just before the holidays and this time I reheated to 65C, dried for 6 hours with 250 gms of activated alumina, and then continued, with the same alumina, to dry for a further 6 hours while the drywash was running. Result Conversion >98%, Water 55ppm, soap 60 ppm. The moisture content of the air on the day was as usual 99%.
www.imakebiodiesel.webs.com
www.polydiesel.webs.com
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks John,

Did exactly that and worked a treat for drying my wet WVO prior to processing. It passed hot pan test in two hours. I heated oil to 75'c. I estimate water content was approximately 1500ppm before drying.
 
Location: Cork | Registered: December 05, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you for the update Imake, dryer biodiesel will be greatly welcomed.
Did you leave the little air bubbler in the processor while doing the dry wash?
 
Registered: April 30, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, the desiccant will not saturate for 12 hours or more so you can keep drying. At the lower temp it does not dry very much but every little counts.

www.imakebiodiesel.webs.com
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have heard from 3 people this winter who have experienced problems running common rail type engines on wet diesel. One customer who makes biodiesel for his 2003 passat has had serious damage done to his wifes 2011 golf engine using wet diesel. ( he has never put biodiesel into it). He tested the diesel in the Golfs tank with his carbide manometer and found 650 ppm of water.
The only way to be sure that diesel is safe to use is to test it yourself. I believe that diesel is delivered from the refinery in a dry state and that the problem occurs during storage at the filling station. If you must buy diesel in wintertime avoid small rural stations that would have a slow turnover and old rusty tanks. Dont buy from anywhere that has above ground tanks or where the price looks suspiciously low.
If you do end up with diesel with excessive water content you could put it into your processor and dry it but long term you would be better to find a better supplier.
 
Location: Lismore Ireland | Registered: November 25, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've come up with a better way to attach the hose onto the lid of the jar for the manometer, though I'm sure some of you have already done this!
It's a brass nipple, with a collar, to give a surface to glue to. I was going to solder it, but there is a seal in the lid that might not survive the heat of soldering. I can seal it on the outside, which should not be exposed to bio.


2001 Citroen Xsara
2002 VW T4 Transporter
on B100


ImageImage.jpg (16 Kb, 28 downloads) Manometer lid
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: December 16, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I had a go at making up IMB's new design dryer above yesterday. I dried a batch of bio with it overnight. I think it will work really well although I can't tell as I don't have a manometer. I'm also trying out a new dessicant in the dryer, I'm not exactly sure what it is made of though, you can check it out if you follow the link below. I have access to as much of this stuff as I like for free. I'm going to try it out in my drywash tower also.

http://www.tropack.com/products/desiccant-bags.htm
 
Location: Clare, Ireland | Registered: May 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Standard filling of the bags is silica gel
 
Location: Cork | Registered: December 05, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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