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Runnaway Diesels on the BP Drilling Rig
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Finally, a corporation that lives up to its word and honors commitments.

Below is an actual 1999 BP Corporation advertisement...................





Imagebp.jpeg (18 Kb, 23 downloads) bp ad
 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Finally, a month after the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon, BP is now trying the first thing that really makes a little sense...

Whack off the mangled leaking section of pipe, and install a new section of pipe with valves.

I do wonder if the US Government had pushed for the ill-fated, more conservative approach earlier leading to the worst oil spill in US history.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We're all familiar with the admonition, "It will take an act of Congress," as a caution to those who are attempting a difficult task. However, Congress is demonstrating that when it comes to its enrichment via power or money, it can act with lightning speed.

The well drilled by Deepwater Horizon off the Gulf Coast has been gushing oil for six weeks, and in that time the response of the federal government has been at best inept and at worst malignantly obstructive. Contingency plans that had been drawn up for such an event were not activated. A request by the state of Louisiana to form an artificial barrier island was greeted by the request for an environmental impact study. What does the EPA think the impact on the marshes and bayous will be when the oil arrives?

For its part, Congress is doing what Congress does best -- quadrupling the tax that funds emergency services for addressing offshore drilling disasters. Granted, a tax of $0.32 per barrel of oil works out to about $0.01 per gallon, but focusing upon the magnitude misses the point. Oil companies will simply pass the tax off on to consumers at the pump. Had the federal government implemented its own plans and procedures immediately once this catastrophe began, or had it responded to state and local government requests with anything other than impediments and evasions, the nightmare might be over now. Given the seeming incompetence demonstrated by the Obama administration over the last six weeks, the entire episode reeks of jaded opportunism. The only thing accomplished so far is that exploration in the Gulf Coast, as well as off the coasts of Virginia and Alaska, has been suspended. Never let a crisis go to waste.

Of course, Obama says that he's been in control the whole time. "The American people should know that from the moment this disaster began the federal government has been in charge of the response effort," he said at Thursday's press conference (the first press conference he has held since last summer). "Make no mistake: BP is operating at our direction." Apparently, he truly believes that the market can operate only at his command.
 
Location: Southern WI, USA | Registered: May 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great quote, what article is it from?

Until the industry smartens up and uses the correct safety equipment and procedures then they have no business drilling in the fragile arctic ecosystem. Better regulations, better regulators and diligent inspectors are needed. This recent incident is one in a long line of examples that show without a doubt that the industry is unable to regulate itself. Like all good capitalists, profit comes first, last and always, with an attitude of screw the environment it does not make money for them.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great quote, what article is it from?


The Patriot Post (www.patriotpost.us/subscribe/)

Usually they are good about siting the article they pull from, but his time there was nothing. Possible an original piece by one of their editors.
 
Location: Southern WI, USA | Registered: May 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by john galt:
Great quote, what article is it from?

Until the industry smartens up and uses the correct safety equipment and procedures then they have no business drilling in the fragile arctic ecosystem.
Might as well keep drilling in the Gulf... They've already wiped out the fragile ecosystem there!!!!

Of course, as Exxon has proven in the North, if humans leave things alone for a while, Nature will recover over time.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Of course, as Exxon has proven in the North, if humans leave things alone for a while, Nature will recover over time.

You're joking of course?

In no way condoning what BP did, however lets keep it in correct perspective.


quote:

That doesn't excuse us from the obligation to learn more about containing these disasters, and my recommendation is that every oil pumping operation should be subject to a separation tax devoted to funding the creation of Civil Defense organizations, a recovery force of specialists, and research and development of recovery methods. I'm no great fan of bureaucracies, but sometimes they are necessary. Fire Departments are bureaucracies. Volunteer fire departments work in some places, private fire fighters have been advocated by strict libertarians, but I'm quite pleased with the Los Angeles Fire Department. I gather that New Yorkers are fond of the NYFD; and indeed mot places I go seem happy with the local fire departments. But that's another discussion about details: the most important thing needed for the future is to re-create Civil Defense, not just for oil spill containment but also hurricanes, earthquakes, twisters, etc.
http://www.jerrypournelle.com/...2010/Q2/view625.html



prodigy's ingenious plan to seal the gap



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
quote:
Of course, as Exxon has proven in the North, if humans leave things alone for a while, Nature will recover over time.

You're joking of course?
No, I'm serious, it is now 20 years later, and you'd be hard pressed to find lingering damage from the Valdez.
quote:

Well, except for the fact that tires have a hole in the middle... and most "modern" tires are tubeless... and those that aren't tubeless... would depend on the inflation of the tubes rather than the tires.

Did she specify inflating the tires with water or air?

What did someone say the pressure coming out of the pipe was? Something like 18,000 lbs pressure? I think I'll have to check the sidewall rating on my tires to see if they will suffice.

That aside, BP is finally doing something that is worthwhile.
Cutting off the top of the pipe to expose clean pipe (hopefully also cutting the drill bit).
Installing a pipe over it with seals, methanol injection, etc...

And, like the tire suggestion, hopefully the seals are designed to be inflated with water.... silicone, or something.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've admittedly not kept up with the details on the situation, but I recall reading that the entire situation developed in very short order, and the methane cloud was but one very rapidly developing part of it all. They may have had no time or warning about a methane cloud since it came out of the hole under extreme pressures.

It'll likely come down to someone not following prescribed procedures or a fault in those procedures that until this accident, was unforeseen or unknown.
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padma
 
Registered: June 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm serious, it is now 20 years later, and you'd be hard pressed to find lingering damage from the Valdez.


A lot of people including myself wouldn't agree with that.


20 Years After Exxon Valdez Oil Spill, Alaskan Coastline Remains Contaminated, Residents Still Struggle for Justice

Today marks the twentieth anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, one of the worst environmental disasters in history. The Exxon Valdez spilled between 11 and 38 million gallons of crude oil into the fishing waters of Prince William Sound. The spill contaminated more than 1,200 miles of Alaska’s shoreline and killed hundreds of thousands of seabirds and marine animals. It also dealt a staggering blow to the residents of local fishing towns, and the effects of the disaster are still being felt today. We speak with Riki Ott, a community activist, marine toxicologist, former commercial salmon fisherma’am and author of two books on the spill. Her latest is Not One Drop: Betrayal and Courage in the Wake of the Exxon Valdez Spill.

AMY GOODMAN: Today marks the twentieth anniversary of one of the worst environmental disasters in history. It was March 24th, 1989, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker struck a reef off the coast of Alaska. The ship’s captain, Joseph Hazelwood, was legally intoxicated at the time, had surrendered the wheel to his subordinates when it slammed into the reef. This is the distress call he made where he says the ship was "leaking some oil."

JOSEPH HAZELWOOD: We’re hard aground, north of Goose Island off Bligh Reef. Evidently, we’re leaking some oil. And we’re going to be here for a while.


AMY GOODMAN: The Exxon Valdez spilled between 11 and 38 million gallons of crude oil into the fishing waters of Prince William Sound. The spill contaminated more than 1,200 miles of Alaska’s shoreline, killed hundreds of thousands of seabirds and marine animals. It also dealt a staggering blow to the residents of the local fishing towns, and the effects of the disaster are still being felt today.

A report marking the twentieth anniversary of the spill has found oil still persists in the region and, in some places, quote, “is nearly as toxic as it was a few weeks after the spill.” The report was put together by the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council, which oversaw restoration efforts. It states, quote, “At this rate, the remaining oil will take decades and possibly centuries to disappear entirely.”

And twenty years after the disaster, litigation against Exxon continues to drag on. In 1994, an Alaskan jury found Exxon responsible and ruled the company should pay $5 billion in punitive damages to some 33,000 plaintiffs. Exxon appealed. In 2006, the 9th US Circuit Court cut the award of punitive damages in half to $2.5 billion. Then, in a 5-to-3 ruling last June, the Supreme Court cut the amount of punitive damages again and ordered Exxon Mobil to pay just $500 million in punitive damages, one-tenth of the original jury’s ruling. That equates to about four days of Exxon Mobil’s net profits.

continues at:
http://www.democracynow.org/20...ter_exxon_valdez_oil

also:

Expert from Exxon Valdez accident saddened by oil spill's effects
By Sara Kennedy
Bradenton Herald

ST. PETERSBURG — Scientists meeting here Wednesday to discuss the oil spill's effects on the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem had a visitor at the table with plenty of first-hand experience.

Phillip R. Mundy is the former scientific director for the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council. The council was formed to oversee $900 million worth of restoration to the injured Alaska ecosystem, where the Exxon Valdez tanker caused a huge spill in Prince William Sound in 1989, according to the council's website.

"They want to know what they're up against, and it's very, very sad," was Mundy's assessment as Florida scientists met to discuss the Deepwater Horizon spill’s consequences.

"It's very, very sad to me to come back and see this," he said.

His take?

In Alaska, he said they looked at what the oil had done to the environmental system, and how it had changed as a result.

Once, the herring fisheries there comprised some of the biggest in the Gulf of Alaska, said Mundy.

In 1993, four years after the spill, those populations collapsed, he said.

"After 1989, we quit fishing, we haven't fished for 15 years," Mundy said. "The herring population is very, very low. I can't tell you exactly how it worked, but it is obvious the oil triggered something in the ecosystem."

"You may be looking at the same kind of situation here with tuna," he surmised.
http://www.miamiherald.com/201...valdez-accident.html



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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About 11 hours before the Deepwater Horizon exploded, a disagreement took place between the top manager for oil giant BP PLC on the drilling rig and his counterpart for the rig's owner, Transocean Ltd., concerning the final steps in shutting down the nearly completed well, according to a worker's sworn statement.

Michael Williams, a Transocean employee who was chief electronics technician on the rig, said there was "confusion" between those high-ranking officials in an 11 a.m. meeting on the day of the rig blast, according to a sworn statement from Mr. Williams reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. Mr. Williams himself attended the meeting.

The confusion over the drilling plan in the final hours leading up to the explosion could be key to understanding the causes of the blowout and ultimately who was responsible.

What is known from drilling records and congressional testimony is that after the morning meeting, the crew began preparations to remove from the drill pipe heavy drilling "mud" that provides pressure to keep down any gas, and to replace this mud with lighter seawater.

Ultimately, the crew removed the mud before setting a final 300-foot cement plug that is typically poured as a last safeguard to prevent combustible gas from rising to the surface. Indeed, they never got the opportunity to set the plug.

Robert Kaluza & Donald Vidrine were BP's company men on the Deepwater Horizon, the former was the well site leader, both were scheduled to testify but have exercised their 5th Amendment rights to not incriminate themselves, Vidrine citing illness for his failure to attend.

BP is well known in the industry for its "Masters of the Universe persona" especially since it took over Amoco, always confident that it could go "where no one had ever gone before".

The above two and Transocean managers aboard the Deepwater Horizon spent hours attempting to determine why drilling mud had been lost from the down-hole casing before the tremendous blowout occurred.

Miles Ezell was the senior toolpusher for Transocean, he testified before a panel of federal investigators Friday that BP company man Donald Vidrine was puzzled by the loss of mud during a negative pressure test.

That test was intended to determine the safety of replacing mud in the riser with seawater as the rig crew prepared to cap that well and move to another drilling site. The weight of the head or column of drilling mud is one safeguard against a blowback of oil and gas from a highly pressurized underground formation.

“He (Vidrine) wasn’t happy” about the negative pressure test results, Ezell told a panel of investigators for the U.S. Coast Guard and federal Minerals Management Service. Ezell said Transocean’s offshore installation manager, Jimmy Harrell, had insisted that the negative pressure test be conducted.

“That was something that Jimmy Harrell … was adamant about,” Ezell said. “He (Harrell) said that day he would always do a negative pressure test.”

Harrell testified Thursday that Vidrine and another BP company man, Robert Kaluza, sent word that a second negative pressure test was conducted successfully.... Now then.... this is a bit fishy to me.... Why would both company men send word that the second test had been completed successfully. Surely this news would come to the OIM (Herrell) from the Transocean Driller or STP (Ezell)... I just dont get this, it stinks

Ezell testified that he received a call in his room at about 9:50 p.m. on the night of the explosion. That call was from assistant driller Stephen Curtis, 39, of the village of Georgetown in Grant Parish.

“He said: ‘The well is blowing out,’ ” Ezell recalled.

Ezell said he threw on some clothes and stepped into a passageway just in time to be knocked down by the force of a huge explosion.

Curtis, Gordon Jones, 28, of Baton Rouge; Blair Manuel, 56, of St. Amant; and Jason Anderson, 40, of Bay City, Texas, were on the rig floor at the time of the blowout and are considered to have died then.

Christopher Pleasant is a subsea supervisor for Transocean who also was on the rig that night, he testified Friday that a supervisor told him approximately four hours before the explosion that the first negative pressure test revealed that the well pipe had lost 60 barrels of drilling mud.

Transocean’s Anderson and BP’s Vidrine then disagreed on the type of negative pressure test to run on a second attempt, Pleasant said he was told. He said he also was told that Kaluza preferred a different test from the others. Yeah I bet he did....perhaps the type of test that would find 60 barrels of lost mud...

A second test was performed, Pleasant said. He said he didn’t know which type of test was employed. (WOAAHHH..... COP-OUT OR WHAT??) “We didn’t see anything flow back,” he added. “We started displacing the well with seawater.”

Pleasant said he left the rig floor to tend to other duties in the forward part of the rig. He never heard the steel-smashing explosion. “I heard popping,” Pleasant said. “But I never heard the big boom.”

Once the blowout occurred, Pleasant testified, it was his predetermined duty to punch a button activating the rig’s emergency disconnect system. That system was designed to cut and seal the well pipe and detach the rig from the well. (This means operate the BOP)

Pleasant said he ran to the bridge and announced: “I’m hitting the EDS.”

“The captain (Curt Kuchta) told me: ‘Calm down, Chris. We’re not EDSing,’ ” Pleasant said.He said the captain moved away from the button and was talking with other people on the bridge.

The others were doing their jobs, Pleasant said.“I did mine,” he said, adding that he punched the button 30 seconds later. Four or five minutes after that, Pleasant said, Kuchta gave the order to hit the EDS button. He said the next order was to abandon ship. So which was it? 30 seconds or four or five minutes? one thing we know for sure is that the BOP did not seal the well.

[...] Typically well owner BP would have final say, since it was paying roughly $1 million a day to lease the rig and pay for services from 12 companies that had people on the rig.

What is clear is that workers soon began displacing the mud. Later that afternoon a pressure test provided ambiguous readings, a possible sign of gas seeping in, according to what Rep. Henry Waxman says a BP executive told House investigators. Eventually, in the evening, after further tests, BP made a decision to carry forth in removing more drilling mud. The rig blew about 10 p.m.

http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread576565/pg1



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've been watching a lot of c-span testimony, and I worked on rigs for a couple seasons. Certainly something went wrong, but I'm not sure any of us actually know right now. The investigators asking questions don't know enough about drilling to ask the right questions, so I find it doubtful that we will ever know exactly what happened.
 
Location: CO, CA, KS, or FL | Registered: January 17, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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For the more creative/inventive of the group:

Can ordinary people think of a way to stop the oil? (BBC Article)


"Political language... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind."

George Orwell
 
Registered: June 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by HelpingHand:
Certainly something went wrong, but I'm not sure any of us actually know right now. The investigators asking questions don't know enough about drilling to ask the right questions, so I find it doubtful that we will ever know exactly what happened.
That is why we need more lawyers involved... people who have absolutely no idea what is going on, incapable of even changing their own oil, making all kinds of wonderful rules.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by ebztz:
For the more creative/inventive of the group:

Can ordinary people think of a way to stop the oil? (BBC Article)
Actually, that link just takes one to BBC.

I believe this is the official BP suggestion link. Both for stopping the spill and cleanup.

http://www.deepwaterhorizonres.../go/doc/2931/546759/
http://www.horizonedocs.com/artform.php
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That is why we need more lawyers involved... people who have absolutely no idea what is going on, incapable of even changing their own oil, making all kinds of wonderful rules.

That's how the US got the government it has today



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have sent in three suggestions on the last link you posted Keelec, one of which would be quite simple and inexpensive, it would be a piece of pipe, say 10" in diameter and twenty or thirty feet long, with a conical cap on the end that inserts into the riser pipe, on the other end of this pipe would be a long taper from the 10" pipe size to say, 10' diameter twenty feet long, this would be an inverted funnel, simply fill the entire thing with concrete and insert it into the riser pipe and lower it until it acts like a needle valve and plugs the riser pipe, it would have to overcome around 20k psi so all you need is enough concrete to over come that psi.
They would need to unbolt the blow out preventer and get rid of it, then they would have flanged end to work with.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Who Was in Charge of Rig? No One.

As investigators try to figure out what events led to the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon, it's becoming increasingly clear that the whole operation was a mess, reports the New York Times.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/06/us/06rig.html?hp
Essentially, a case of too many chefs in the kitchen, where no one was in charge but everyone seemed to know what was best. First, on the regulatory side, there were a number of oversight agencies that seemed all too willing to grant BP exception to rules. The technology used in deep-water rigs is often so new that regulators end up listening to the industry about how existing regulation should be adapted. Safety inspections are little more than cosmetic, and officials didn't require BP to be ready with a solution for what the company had itself identified as a worst-case scenario. On the rig itself, there were a hodgepodge of people, working for different companies with differing interests. Of the 126 people at the rig on the day of the explosion, only eight were BP employees. Many workers on the rig had been expressing concern about several aspects of the operation, warning that they weren't safe. But there wasn't one single person in charge of safety, a fact that became painfully clear when the explosion occurred and no one seemed to know what to do. That confusion then extended to the cleanup efforts, leading to unnecessary delays.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Originally posted by keelec:
quote:
Originally posted by ebztz:
For the more creative/inventive of the group:

Can ordinary people think of a way to stop the oil? (BBC Article)
Actually, that link just takes one to BBC.
Strange that it works fine on my end. ??


"Political language... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind."

George Orwell
 
Registered: June 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by ebztz:
Strange that it works fine on my end. ??
The link is good...

It just takes you to BBC & BBC suggestion lines.

The links I sent above take you to BP.

Of course, it is unclear which pages are actually being monitored, read, & acted upon.

fabricator
Good...
I sent in an "idea" today...
It appears to me that there is a good accessible flange on top of the blowout preventer. But, perhaps you're right, throw away the malfunctioning unit and use the flange below the unit.

It appears to me as if everyone is doing these "top hats/top caps/box cars & etc... as a temporary fix just to capture some of the oil, without actually trying to fix the leak. And, whatever they're doing, they are not getting a good permanent seal.

As far as the "needle valve"...
why mess around with concrete (although I guess it is cheap).
Whatever the size of that pipe, just make your needle valve out of solid steel. Anyway, whatever you use, it needs a good seal on the top&bottom.

It looks like there is pipe under the blowout preventer... probably should shoot the needle down there in case there are crimps & etc inside of the blowout preventer. And, build a good underwater post pounder to drive it into place.

The "Siphon" should work...
Oil is lower density than water.
The weight of the mile long column of oil should be less than the equivalent column of water.

But, for some reason it isn't siphoning off enough oil. Perhaps too small of pipes (and too high of resistance). A good high-volume, low-pressure pump with a big outfeed pipe would give them enough pressure differential to overcome the problems with the siphon.

My idea...
Just build a flanged connection with valves... align it with the valves open to sea water... then switch over to the pipe to the ship. Not too complicated... I assume alignment is tough, but it has to be possible. And auxiliary pump would create negative pressure if necessary.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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