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Runnaway Diesels on the BP Drilling Rig
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There was a 60 minute report on the BP Drilling Rig Accident.

I didn't see the whole show, but from what I saw....
They used "drilling mud" to compensate for the pressure differential in the hole and the surface.

But, there was some kind of a methane gas "burp".

The Deepwater Horizon was supposed to be one of the most advanced (and expensive) drilling rigs in the world. Yet, there was no way to contain this methane "burp", and they just let it spill onto the deck of the drilling rig, which was dangerous for the people & equipment.

The Methane then was sucked into the Diesel Engines & Generators...

Which caused a "runnaway diesel effect". No shutoffs, filters, clean-air-systems, or anything...

And, according to the person being interviewed, nothing limiting the voltage output of the generators... causing a massive voltage spike.

I was thinking about runaway Diesels...
First of all, they need to have a clean air intake.
But, the easiest thing would be to put a good valve on the air intake.
I suppose it would be like a vacuum pump, and one would have to have a sturdy valve.
Perhaps one could dump CO2, or even exhaust into the intake.

What the *&#^(#@*&^*#@%&^@#$%&^$%&^$%& was BP doing with...
  • Disabled Blowout Prevention Device.
  • Possibly bad seal 1 mile under the sea (how was the seal supposed to be repaired).
  • No speed voltage limiters on the generators.
  • No cut-off devices on on the Diesels.
  • No Vents for the methane.
We're probably only seeing part of the picture, but something just doesn't add up.

Where are our regulators? Safety Experts?

And, this "drilling rig" was built in South Korea. Would it have been any different had it been built here in the USA?

In a sense, safety equipment just seems superfluous... until it is really needed at which point it is too late.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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BP have an appalling safety record and are ruthless in their dealings.

Getting Governments to look the other way is easy for these dudes, wars have been fought to promote their interests.
 
Location: Nimbin Australia | Registered: December 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"Drill Baby Drill, don't worry about the regulations or unintended consequences", yeah right.
Now you see why it's a whole lot cheaper to buy Arab oil to fuel the amount needed for the military machine. Maybe it would be a good idea to leave that expensive-to-drill domestic oil in the ground for now; we're going to need it a whole lot more in the future when the Arab oil is all gone.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Maybe it would be a good idea to leave that expensive-to-drill domestic oil in the ground for now; we're going to need it a whole lot more in the future when the Arab oil is all gone.


It has crossed my mind more than once that that might be exactly the plan of the "planners in the dark room" in Washington, DC.

"Yeah, we'll just keep paying them $100 a barrel of their Arab oil, then when its all gone they can pay us $1000 a barrel for our Alaskan and off-shore oil that we haven't even tapped into yet."

In the mean time we'll develop the oil replacement technology, but hide that we have it at all.
 
Location: Southern WI, USA | Registered: May 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm all for considering the Alaskan Wilderness Oil (assuming it actually exists) as part of our "Strategic Oil Reserve".

And, of course, looking for other technologies so that perhaps we will never need it.

Part of the offshore oil push is the "out of sight, out of mind" feeling... until it comes splashing back at us.

A little more research...
The Deepwater Horizon was designed by Reading & Bates which is an engineering company now owned by Transocean (which is a multinational company based in Switzerland).
It was built by Hyundai Heavy Industries at Ulsan, Korea shipyard.
It is registered in the Marshall Islands.
And, of course was operating in US Waters.

It has a "sister ship", the Deepwater Nautilus which is also owned by Transocean, registered in Panama, but currently leased by Shell Oil, and also currently operating at 5,000 feet.

Are all these other drilling rigs running as "business as usual"?

What is the deal with foreign built, foreign registered ships operating primarily in US territory?

Does the Marshall Islands have any liability towards the spill in the USA?
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
"Yeah, we'll just keep paying them $100 a barrel of their Arab oil, then when its all gone they can pay us $1000 a barrel for our Alaskan and off-shore oil that we haven't even tapped into yet."

In the mean time we'll develop the oil replacement technology, but hide that we have it at all.

The Stone Age didn't end because they ran out of stones...



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Originally posted by keelec:
A little more research...
The Deepwater Horizon was designed by Reading & Bates which is an engineering company now owned by Transocean (which is a multinational company based in Switzerland).
It was built by Hyundai Heavy Industries at Ulsan, Korea shipyard.
It is registered in the Marshall Islands.
And, of course was operating in US Waters.

It has a "sister ship", the Deepwater Nautilus which is also owned by Transocean, registered in Panama, but currently leased by Shell Oil, and also currently operating at 5,000 feet.

Are all these other drilling rigs running as "business as usual"?

What is the deal with foreign built, foreign registered ships operating primarily in US territory?

Does the Marshall Islands have any liability towards the spill in the USA?




Monday, May 17, 2010 18:29 ET
Resigning MMS regulator gave Transocean a safety award last year
By Alex Pareene
http://www.salon.com/news/poli...ean_award/index.html

Here is a photo of Chris Oynes, the Minerals Managmenent Service associate director of offshore energy who just resigned, giving an award to Transocean last year.

Oynes, who's resigning at the end of the month, is the industry-friendly head regulator of offshore drilling. MMS presented Transocean with a "Safety Award for Excellence" (or, creatively enough, "SAFE") for "'outstanding drilling operations' and a 'perfect performance period' in the Lafayette District of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico during 2008...." (It wasn't their first.)

The crew of Transocean's Deepwater Horizon was also recognized. A year later it blew up and it is still leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There are two aspects of "Safety".
  • Luck
  • Prevention
As with biodiesel.
Many homebrewers have an excellent safety record.... until they burn down their house.

In the case with the Deepwater Horizon, there were probably a half a dozen things that had to go wrong in order for the cascade of events leading to the sinking of the platform and the leak.

But, had they taken the effort to make sure they had good, safe, working seals in the blowout preventer, tested the blowout preventer and other equipment in deep water, a method to prevent methane from entering the operations area, emergency shutdowns on the Diesel Engines, compartmentalized flotation, redundant wellhead access & shutdowns...

It wouldn't be causing hundreds of billions of dollars damage now.

The methane burp... whatever it was that caused the accident wouldn't have even made the news. They'd now be working out a way to deliver CNG or LNG to the southern USA & moving their oil pumping platform into place.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
The Stone Age didn't end because they ran out of stones...
The Stone Age ended because of the invention of better stones and better caves.

However, many changes have happened because of shortages.

Colonization and the settling of the Americas was because of shortages of wood and natural products in Europe.

Coal and Petroleum Oil were invented because of shortages of wood and whales.

And, of course, exponential population growth in the Animal Kingdom has often been followed by massive die-offs.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm just waiting for gas prices from all the companies to take a huge sympathetic leap because BP needs a lot of money to pay for the cleanup, I would absolutely love this thing to completely destroy BP, I know it's just a pipe dream, but one is allowed to dream.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In the case with the Deepwater Horizon

...we can be sure that is was designed and built by the lowest bidders in every stage of the ship's construction.

We've all had problems with cheaply made toys and tools. In the scale of things in the ocean they're like toys in a lake, with the same problems having bigger mistakes.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: john galt,



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by John Galt:
Maybe it would be a good idea to leave that expensive-to-drill domestic oil in the ground for now; we're going to need it a whole lot more in the future when the Arab oil is all gone.
Do you think the American Oil Companies would thing that their stopping oil production would be a good idea?


quote:
Originally posted by Ryan P.:
"Yeah, we'll just keep paying them $100 a barrel of their Arab oil, then when its all gone they can pay us $1000 a barrel for our Alaskan and off-shore oil that we haven't even tapped into yet."
Camels do not use much oil.
 
Registered: April 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Do you think the American Oil Companies would thing that their stopping oil production would be a good idea?

Most "American Oil Companies" are multinational oil companies. They're going to exploit the most cost effective oil first, anywhere in the world. Most other places [other than N.Sea] are cheaper to exploit because the environmental cost is much lower than offshore US.




 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If that is the case why are they still producing crude in the USA?



 
Registered: April 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It costs about 6 bucks a barrel to get oil out of a land well and about 35 bucks a barrel on a deep sea rig.
One of the reasons the oil companies go for this high risk drilling is that the have been shut out of many of the big fields by nationally owned oil companies like Aramco. In some cases Governments encourage/subsidize it on strategic grounds.

There is an awful lot of cheap oil in central Asia which the Chinese and Russians are starting to tap into but to get it to the west you need a pipe through Afghanistan?
 
Location: Nimbin Australia | Registered: December 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
why are they still producing crude in the USA?

Because there are old wells in old fields which can yield more oil with the advanced secondary recovery techniques available today. The lower graph posted above shows how the production from con-US is declining. The US domestic fields had their heyday in WW2 when they supplied the fuel that won WW2. Ironically it would have wasted less oil to have traded oil with Japan instead of provoking a war, but the "war is good for the economy" people made the decisions.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You guys should check out this well blow out in Indonesia, they struck a mud volcano 4 years ago and can't stop it. Wiki
 
Location: Nimbin Australia | Registered: December 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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On Doomed Rig, There Was 'Nobody in Charge'

Published May 28, 2010

The Wall Street Journal
quote:
An examination by The Wall Street Journal of what happened aboard the Deepwater Horizon just before and after the explosions suggests the rig was unprepared for the kind of disaster that struck and was overwhelmed when it occurred. The events on the bridge raise questions about whether the rig's leaders were prepared for handling such a fast-moving emergency and for evacuating the rig—and, more broadly, whether the U.S. has sufficient safety rules for such complex drilling operations in very deep water.

The chain of command broke down at times during the crisis, according to many crew members. They report that there was disarray on the bridge and pandemonium in the lifeboat area, where some people jumped overboard and others called for boats to be launched only partially filled.

The vessel's written safety procedures appear to have made it difficult to respond swiftly to a disaster that escalated at the speed of the events on April 20. For example, the guidelines require that a rig worker attempting to contain a gas emergency had to call two senior rig officials before deciding what to do. One of them was in the shower during the critical minutes, according to several crew members.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Originally posted by sinbad:
You guys should check out this well blow out in Indonesia, they struck a mud volcano 4 years ago and can't stop it. Wiki
Interesting. And, too bad that in most places, MUD is worthless... if it had been oil, they would figure out a way to recover it.

But I suppose this shows another risk... what if the oil doesn't come up the pipe?
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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BP takes the 5th amendment SMH
 
Location: Nimbin Australia | Registered: December 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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