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B100 use in post-injection modern diesels, leading to high engine wear
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That is, of course, your opinion.


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"When you don't think what you say, you say what you think" Jacinto Benavente.

"Wars not make one great" Yoda.

"A pessimist is a well informed optimist"

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Location: Miami, Florida. | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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An opinion verified by test data at a certified govt test facility.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sure.


************************

"When you don't think what you say, you say what you think" Jacinto Benavente.

"Wars not make one great" Yoda.

"A pessimist is a well informed optimist"

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Location: Miami, Florida. | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
My truck don't care about your opinion.


And I don't care about yours.
But you say your opinion is supported.
Let's see...

What's your engine's thermal efficiency?
It's volumetric efficiency?
VOCs emissions? (on dino diesel, of course)
Particulates emissions?
Weight/power ratio?

Of course, I expect you to provide links where your numbers (if you have them) could be verified...


************************

"When you don't think what you say, you say what you think" Jacinto Benavente.

"Wars not make one great" Yoda.

"A pessimist is a well informed optimist"

WWVhaCwgSSdtIGEgZ2Vlay4gU08gV0hBVD8=
 
Location: Miami, Florida. | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by dkenny:
all the newer engines use glow plugs to heat/preheat the combustion chamber. does this also hold for the large truck engines?


My 5.9L Cummins has an electric heating grid in the intake manifold. It warms the air coming into the engine. No glow plugs required.

Ken
 
Location: Sellersville, PA | Registered: May 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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About Diesel compression ratios

The older IDI non turbo diesels seemed to typically have a compression ratio of around 20- 21:1.
The Newr DI turbo engines seem to typically be around 17:1






 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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About Diesel compression ratios

The older IDI non turbo diesels seemed to typically have a compression ratio of around 20- 21:1.
The Newr DI turbo engines seem to typically be around 17:1


Saint Tilly


Tilly,

What does this mean to me driving a 2008 6.7L Cumins? What do the compression ratios have to do with the article stating that newer engines experience excessive wear from running B100? Forgive my ignorance...I'm just not that mechanically inclined.

Thanks,

Grey


2008 Dodge Ram 2500 6.7L MegaCab 4x4, Edge Juice w/Attitude and love it! Semper Fi
 
Registered: November 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My 5.9L Cummins has an electric heating grid in the intake manifold. It warms the air coming into the engine. No glow plugs required.

Same with my turbo diesel Toyota. No glow plugs required.

Generally, turbo diesel direct injection engines preheat the air and have lower compression ratios than indirect injection diesels with glowplugs.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hello Grey

My post about compression ratios was in response to dkenny's earlier post in this thread about compression:
"I cannot quite pinpoint the issue but something doesn't sit right with me..

all the newer engines use glow plugs to heat/preheat the combustion chamber. does this also hold for the large truck engines?

they mention something about all the tight tolerances of the newer engines..but if they require glow plugs their compression is less than the older engines. for examples my DD8.2L turbo has no glow plugs!! its start on compression only. it also start faster on B100 than the newer diesels running D100.. my dad noticed this when a friend started is chevy diesel the other day.."


And indeed the newer turbo DI engines are lower in compression than the older IDI engines






 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Are the 5.9L. Cummins engines post injection or just the 6.7L.?
 
Location: lake tahoe, ca. | Registered: April 11, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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None of the cummins have the post-injection problem for the DPF regen since they have an added injector directly into the exhaust, not the cylinder. It would be good to come up with a list of other models which do it this better, more expensive way.

Edit: after more research this info is wrong, even the cummins has this post-injection problem. CAT is the engines that added an exhaust injector.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: SunWizard,


YVORMV - Your veg. oil results may vary, see www.burnveg.com/forum
95 Dodge Cummins 4x4
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Location: N. Colorado | Registered: August 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Posted 19 April 2008 08:49 PM Hide Post
None of the cummins have the post-injection problem for the DPF regen since they have an added injector directly into the exhaust, not the cylinder. It would be good to come up with a list of other models which do it this better, more expensive way.


SunWizard,

Does this mean that my 6.7 Cumins wont have the bio problems that this original article refers to?

Grey


2008 Dodge Ram 2500 6.7L MegaCab 4x4, Edge Juice w/Attitude and love it! Semper Fi
 
Registered: November 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Originally posted by SunWizard:
None of the cummins have the post-injection problem for the DPF regen since they have an added injector directly into the exhaust, not the cylinder. It would be good to come up with a list of other models which do it this better, more expensive way.

I asked about this on a different forum. A Dodge service tech told me the 6.7L Cummins in the 2008 Ram doesn't have an exhaust injector.
"No separate injector, the tubes downstream are for the pressure sensors, so the 'regen fuel' is added in the cylinder."

Is he wrong?

Ken
 
Location: Sellersville, PA | Registered: May 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by grey:
Does this mean that my 6.7 Cumins wont have the bio problems that this original article refers to?

Correct, it won't have that problem. It could have other problems we don't know about yet. I wouldn't risk losing the warranty on the fuel system and DPF by running >B20 since there are other common problems reported.

Edit: Bunk is right, even the cummins has this post-injection problem. CAT is the one that added an exhaust injector.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: SunWizard,


YVORMV - Your veg. oil results may vary, see www.burnveg.com/forum
95 Dodge Cummins 4x4
Zero fossil house- 100% solar power and heat.
 
Location: N. Colorado | Registered: August 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Too late. I've been running B100 for about 7,000 + miles now, with no problems.

Grey


2008 Dodge Ram 2500 6.7L MegaCab 4x4, Edge Juice w/Attitude and love it! Semper Fi
 
Registered: November 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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john galt
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Posted 19 April 2008 06:19 PM Hide Post
Computers are not needed for an engine to run clean and efficient.


So, being how you seem to have lost interest in the efficiency of older engines against newer ones, I've been doing some research on my own.
It looks to me that your truck is a 1989 Toyota Land Cruiser 80, equipped with a straight 6, 4.2 L., model 1HD-T Turbodiesel engine (which is the ONLY turbodiesel engine made in the '80s by Toyota, and only on that year), delivering 162 HP @ 3600 rpm and 267 ft-lb of torque @ 1400 rpm.

I can clearly see how that engine is more efficient than, let's say, a VW 4.2L. V8 TDI, which with the same displacement delivers "only" 326 HP @ 3750 rpm, and 560 ft-lb of torque @ 1600 rpm...


************************

"When you don't think what you say, you say what you think" Jacinto Benavente.

"Wars not make one great" Yoda.

"A pessimist is a well informed optimist"

WWVhaCwgSSdtIGEgZ2Vlay4gU08gV0hBVD8=
 
Location: Miami, Florida. | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just remove you DPF and then you troubles, and fuel economy will go WAY up.
 
Location: Pittsburgh Pa | Registered: March 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It could also be a 13B-T, 3.6L, I-4, TDI, 120 HP @ 3400 rpm, 210 lbft @ 2000 rpm...


Could be. but the 13B-T has a torque of 159 ft-lb @ 2200 rpm, not 210 @ 2000, and it is a 3.4L., not 3.6L..
And even then, I'd say it's power/displacement and torque/displacement ratios of 35.294 HP/L. and 46.76 ft-lb/L. don't even come close to the 77.6 HP/L. and 133.33 ft-lb/L. of the VW engine...wouldn't you say?


************************

"When you don't think what you say, you say what you think" Jacinto Benavente.

"Wars not make one great" Yoda.

"A pessimist is a well informed optimist"

WWVhaCwgSSdtIGEgZ2Vlay4gU08gV0hBVD8=
 
Location: Miami, Florida. | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Yer right, it's 3.4L not 3.6L, the 159 lbft is for the non-turbo 3B.


No, sorry:

"13B-T

The 13B-T is a turbocharged version of the 13B engine, with a compression ratio of 17.6:1. Output is 120 hp (89 kW) at 3400 rpm with 159 ft·lbf (284 N·m) of torque at 2200 rpm."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_B_engine#13B-T

But even if it was, that'd make its torque/displacement ratio 61.76 ft-lb/L., still a little short of 133...

quote:
Far fewer moving parts than a V-8, will easily go half a million km and less expensive to operate. VW does not make anything like a Toyota truck, but they're good vehicles none-the-less.


Not the point. You stated that ECUs don't improve efficiency. That has nothing to do with number of moving parts, or engine reliability. And yes, the VW 4.2L. V8 TDI engine is a good engine. Good enough to be the engine for the Audi A8.


************************

"When you don't think what you say, you say what you think" Jacinto Benavente.

"Wars not make one great" Yoda.

"A pessimist is a well informed optimist"

WWVhaCwgSSdtIGEgZ2Vlay4gU08gV0hBVD8=
 
Location: Miami, Florida. | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You stated that ECUs don't improve efficiency

nope, not me, don't twist things around. I stated that a computer was not necessary for a properly designed diesel engine to burn cleanly with minimal pollution.

Believe whichever source of information you want to about the 13B-T, you don't have to be sorry for it.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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