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Seems like the usual slow down during winter, plus the sub $2/gallon fuel prices, has really put the brakes on biodiesel interest.

This forum is so slow its going to start growing cob webs in the corners.


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Registered: March 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For at least 90% of the people that posted anything to the forum, it was merely a passing fad which they thought would give them 'free fuel' with little or no work. Reality is a harsh mistress.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hey Murph! Sup? Yeah unless you come up with a realistic relatively foolproof and relatively easy process, you aint gonna last, the water heater 30 gallon per batch method where you have to make fuel at least once a week is not that process.
My 400 gallon batches work well, I only have to make fuel about five times during the summer, then about three batches in the fall to keep my oil fired boiler going through the winter, I think I'm gonna have a lot left this spring though because winter hasn't really hit yet, which is fine by me.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Go start a thread about determining conversion percentage from dropout volume in the 3/27 test. That usually lights things up around here. Eek Roll Eyes

I've noticed the slow-down also, and I think the main reasons have been hit. It's winter for most of us, which makes things a lot less convenient and less enjoyable -- collecting in the cold isn't much fun. Also, at least around this area, fuel is perceived as being really cheap again and it's easy for people to just fill up the tank at the pump. I believe my cheapest D2 purchase so far this fall was somewhere in the $1.60s range per gallon, and even the most expensive local stations are in the $1.90 range right now. People love buying a cheap tank of gas, but most don't realize that energy prices this low are ultimately negative for the economy.

Cheers, John
 
Registered: June 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi dukegrad,
Ive done that, produced a graph. But don't tell you know who!

Pump diesel over here has just gone down to around £1.00 per litre. I think that equates to about us$ 6.00 per gallon.
 
Location: YORK UK | Registered: April 27, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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1 GBP = 1.516USD as of today.

When I first got started making biodiesel there really wasn't much of an economic margin with pump fuel; I did it primarily 'cause it was environmental. It wasn't until some time later that it also0 became economical as fuel prices slowly edged up (like the boiling frog principle). It is now still mostly environmental, and just knowing that Big Oil isn't having a Merry Christmas on my dime that keeps me going.

Pump fuel here is steady around $1.05/Liter (x 3.78 US conversion =$3.97Cdn to the US gal) Should be a lot less considering the overall drop in crude over the couple years or so, but they do have to get that gouge in there somehow.


Merry Christmas, peace on Earth to men of good will.



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Location: :-) Great White North eh ? | Registered: December 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Hi Dgs,


quote:
Originally posted by Dgs:
Hi dukegrad,
Ive done that, produced a graph. But don't tell you know who!
WOW!
Have you?
I missed the graph!!.
Please re-post the graph and explain the procedure you used to develope it.
We have all been waiting for years for valid experimentation that demonstrates a relationship between conversion and dropout in the 3/27 test Wink






 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yeah, spring and summer was way too busy with my wife being sick and too many other projects that needed attention, including new ones that dad used to do. And with the addition of a second high-mpg diesel Jetta to my fleet and diesel at under $3 per gallon, usually just above $2 per gallon, making fuel just wasn't a top priority.

But I have continued to stockpile the WVO for when I get back on it.
 
Location: Southern WI, USA | Registered: May 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Interesting. It's a small world. I'm the guy who built your waste oil boiler out of 304 stainless in Nashville.

My take on biodiesel and the status of the World in general. It goes with out saying that fuel is quite cheap right now. On surface this appears to be a major boost to Average Joe. Newscasters say that oil will continue to fall. Unfortunately, there is a lot that they don't tell. For example, they don't tell you just how unstable the middle east is right now. Arabs and others are borrowing money every day to stay afloat. I don't think they want to continue this and suspect that chaos will be injected by proxy or created into the oil market which will raise prices. You can have a glut of oil, but if refineries are damaged or need updating (BS used to manipulate the market in a lot of cases) then the price will soar again.

Be like a Institutional equities trader. Buy into WVO and other alt energy BEFORE the chaos and you will be hedging your bet in a world of extreme instability. Used equipment is being sold at a major discount right now.

Cover the basic living essentials as much as you can be self-sustaining. You will be glad you did.
 
Location: Nashville  | Registered: December 16, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The ONLY reason I started making and using biodiesel was to save money. I will leave it to other people to save the world.

Keeping in mind that when I started driving, petrol was 29¢/gallon (8¢/litre) and diesel was about 2/3 that price, I find the current price of $1.35 a litre for diesel still very high.
So I continue to make and use biodiesel.

Obviously, many people do not think the price of fuel is high and have stopped making biodiesel.
Also the apparent misinformation campaign warning people that biodiesel is incompatible with their nice new very expensive diesel engines seems to be a major factor in the demise of biodiesel.

The upside is that I now have access to way too much very lightly used WVO and have reached the point where I am giving it away to a small trucking company that makes and uses biodiesel.
It was cheaper and easier for me to have them pick up my excess WVO than me having to take it to the tip for disposal.
And now I can have that warm fuzzy glow knowing that I am doing my part to save the world- one small trucking company at a time. Wink






 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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12+ yrs It aint a fad with me. Cheers to all still making B100.
 
Location: coquitlam B.C, | Registered: October 05, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Also not fad here.
One decade so far making and using biodiesel year-round in a cold climate.
It makes Canadian diesel fuel burn cleaner and the truck runs better with biodiesel in the mix.
Used veg-oil isn't waste, it's fuel.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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There is only so much that can be said about one topic. Fuel is cheap and and the home brew recipes have been refined. Until something new like enzymes come along we just need to fire up the bar and grill and complain about the weather.
I have ridden a "corn burning" forum down to nothing. I hope this forum stays alive until the net boom.
 
Location: Virginia | Registered: March 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fabricator:
Hey Murph! Sup? Yeah unless you come up with a realistic relatively foolproof and relatively easy process, you aint gonna last, the water heater 30 gallon per batch method where you have to make fuel at least once a week is not that process.
My 400 gallon batches work well, I only have to make fuel about five times during the summer, then about three batches in the fall to keep my oil fired boiler going through the winter, I think I'm gonna have a lot left this spring though because winter hasn't really hit yet, which is fine by me.


Well that's kind of harsh.. I've always thought making biodiesel is about as complex as making bacon and eggs for breakfast. It requires a bit more physical effort obviously, but its still not difficult to do.

There is a big advantage to big batches though.. no doubt about the added convenience there..

Nice to talk to you again.. keep in touch neighbor!


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Registered: March 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by 3kW Wind Turbine:
Interesting. It's a small world. I'm the guy who built your waste oil boiler out of 304 stainless in Nashville.

Sweet!! How's that boiler working out for you?


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Waste Oil Heating - Biodiesel Systems
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Registered: March 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fuelfarmer:
There is only so much that can be said about one topic. Fuel is cheap and and the home brew recipes have been refined. Until something new like enzymes come along we just need to fire up the bar and grill and complain about the weather.
I have ridden a "corn burning" forum down to nothing. I hope this forum stays alive until the net boom.


Hey Fuelfarmer,

We bought feeder pigs this year again and I have a question for you.

My last batch of pigs taught me that I have to find a way to supplement their feed costs so I put up a pasture for them and intend on growing corn on one side of it for them to forage through.

Anyhow, I got my hands on a 1940's McCormick 240 series two row corn planter with side dress fertilizing. I've torn the entire thing apart, sandblasted everything clean, and am rebuilding it and modifying to fit the three-point on my tractor.

My question for you is how much fertilizer should I let the side dressing chutes drop? I can't seem to figure that part out. I figure I'm supposed to use some 46-0-0 right? But how much of it?? Any ideas?

Thanks!


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Waste Oil Heating - Biodiesel Systems
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Registered: March 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Murphy:
quote:
Originally posted by 3kW Wind Turbine:
Interesting. It's a small world. I'm the guy who built your waste oil boiler out of 304 stainless in Nashville.

Sweet!! How's that boiler working out for you?

Boiler is going fine. It attracts some attention, based on its appearance. I had a few hiccups at first, but seems to be related to tainted fuel or operator error : ) I bought a used Filtermaxx 2400g centrifuge last week to clean up the oil. Built a heater for the centrifuge based on the one you designed. Going to try it out this week.

See picture in attachment

Image477-1.JPG (34 Kb, 19 downloads)
 
Location: Nashville  | Registered: December 16, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I got into the oil thing for the cost savings and didn't having the gall to admit that get the greenwashed do gooders up in arms? If I could catch up with some of the saver the world morons that gave me grief about it who only lasted a year or 2 in it themselves, I would smack them in the face for their hypocracy.

I'm into my 12th year of oiling now and it's been a great benifit. When I did get into it money was tight and it allowed us to do things we could not have otherwise. My kids went to an out of area school and just the fuel bill for that alone was a burden. I bought the first old merc and it became known far and wide through my kids school. There wasn't a kid in the place that didn't know of the car that ran on fish and chip oil and how many parents approached me and asked if it were actually true I couldn't count.

Later the benefits were still there. My son who got a bit over the whole oil thing realised what it meant when he got his license. Here the kids have to do 120 hours supervised driving experience before they can get their license on their own. He had surpassed his hours in the 6 month minimum time where as some of his friends took over a year.
The thing was for many of his friends, the parents could not afford fuel to just drive round for the sake of it. They had to wait till there was somewhere to go and get their hours up that way. For my kids going for a drive anytime the whim and my nerves could take it was taken for granted.
And what do you do when you are driving round aimlessley for the sake of it? You go looking for oil right? My kids could reverse the truck into narrow spaces and turn that thing round in confines I wasn't even sure possible the first time.

The Tyres on my truck hang outside the guards just on the legal limit. My sons party trick was to reverse the thing along size dumpster bins just brushing the tyre along the side to show the precision of his reversing skills..... even when there was 6ft of room on the other side of the truck. :0)

I was visiting a friend the other week who is teaching her son and in the exact same boat. There wasn't going to be any driving for him for a few weeks with Christmas coming up and money in the house being tight. He was pretty stoked to be able to go out for a couple of hours although not a little nervous about taking my tank out but it was defiantly a good addition to his driving experience. I used to get asked to take my sons girlfriend out for driving lessons as well to get her hours up but that was more because her father was/is an arsewhole not because he was in anyway short of money.

When my kids did get their licenses and were at school and even after they started work, they still flog my car regularly to get out of having to put fuel in theirs . It isn't as cheap here as it is in the US.

These days we are pretty well off financially and my daughter was just given a new petrol car. Her old one was petrol too but this one was not because we couldn't find a small diesel that would run bio, it was because we wanted her in something as safe as they got. Nothing here will run on oil and has airbags or ABS or any of that. If she can't pay for fuel I can and don't give a damn as long as she is safe as she can be. My wife has had a petrol car for years and my son's wasn't a diesel either.

Mine still gets used more than any other because it doesn't cost anything in fuel and is the biggest and most roomy vehicle. The thing is there are no Diesels here that can run on oil or bio that are relatively new. My son has a ute and looked at diesel pickups but again, there haven't been any built for a long time that would be suitable for oil and he needed something reliable he didn't ( Or more over -I-) didn't have to work on every damn weekend.

I think this is a big part of why the alternative fuel thing has fallen over as well. Not everyone wants to drive in a 20 Yo vehicle and I don't want my wife or daughter driving round in things that were proving less than reliable due to age and didn't have all the safety features. I think mine has an amount of inherent safety by it's size but little cars need all the help they can get.

The other thing is the greenwashed do gooders have found other causes to talk about at their cocktail parties and when sipping latte's in their inner city trendy cafe's and no longer get brownie points for that. The trend now is to go electric no matter how counter productive that may actually be to the environment in the big picture.

Of course those of us that have been playing in the oily sandpit for years have long since settled on our procedures and built our mad max like contraptions and are happy with what works for us.
I am still processing my oil the same way I did 8 years back with no changed to the system at all. Matter of fact I was only thinking the other day how I am still using the same air circulating fan on the processor I started out with and the same water filter holder as well. I must have done in excess of 40,000 L of oil with those things now. I have changed barrels and burned out a few pumps ( through my own fault) but the setup is still the same.

I still add ULP and I still run water injection. My truck still doesn't have any heating of the oil and unlike some ignorantly think, it still gets to freezing point in winter. I still break about 90% of the parroted veg oil mantra and I'm still waiting for my engine to die as people have been telling me pretty much from day 1. The thing is, unlike my first old merc that used to weeze around getting left behind by the traffic, this thing monsters if I want it to especially on the highway where it's on boost all the time and when I put a load of ethanol in the water injection and really wake it up. I can have the thing loaded to the gun whales and still to the 300KM trip to my fathers place up the highway and through the mountains at least 10km /h over the speed limit or as fast as I can drive the thing through the corners. That's all the power and speed I need.

While ever I can find a vehicle that can run oil and am physically up to it I'll have a veg mobile. It pretty much identifies a part of who I am these days with friends of friends I only see at parties etc asking me if I'm still running my car on fish and chip oil?

I was never in this for the environmental factor and so I'm far from dissapointed the hysteria has worn off. There is oil everywhere now and the cowboy collectors are back to being slack in picking it up given the price of waste oil is so closely tied to the price of diesel. There are places I go now with full bins and a stack of tins sitting beside them. I can get 1000L of oil in a weekend with no problem. it's just limited to how many trips I want to make or whether I load the ute with an IBC or just the 44 gallon drum.
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Murphy, I had to ask my dad and brother about planting corn. They said up to 60 lbs of N per acre. You can have P and K in the mix also if you need it in the soil. Make sure you are no closer than 2 inches from the seed row or you can burn the new plants. 2 inches off to the side and two inches deep is a good place to start.
 
Location: Virginia | Registered: March 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by fuelfarmer:
Murphy, I had to ask my dad and brother about planting corn. They said up to 60 lbs of N per acre. You can have P and K in the mix also if you need it in the soil. Make sure you are no closer than 2 inches from the seed row or you can burn the new plants. 2 inches off to the side and two inches deep is a good place to start.


Ah ha! Thank you very much!

Now I just have to figure out a way to get a pole bean seed in between each corn seed..

I'm still trying to determine if I should side dress with the 46-0-0 or a triple 20.. My friend said if I put the beans in, use the triple 20 because beans make their own nitrogen and the corn will steal some of it. If I just go straight corn, then go with the 46-0-0.

What I couldn't figure out is how much.. I guess I'll have to weigh the hoppers to see how much fertilizer they hold and then figure out how many feet of corn rows there are and then adjust the mechanism to drop the appropriate amount. Its going to be a circus for the first couple of rows...

Thanks again!


www.MurphysMachines.Com
The best Do-it-Yourself Construction Plans on the Internet!
Waste Oil Heating - Biodiesel Systems
Biodiesel Pumps Made In The USA
 
Registered: March 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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