BIODIESEL & SVO DISCUSSION FORUMS






Sponsors    Biodiesel and SVO Forums Home    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Biodiesel  Hop To Forums  General Biodiesel Discussion    Winter treatment samples of biodiesel with photo

Moderators: Shaun, The Trouts

Closed Topic Closed
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Winter treatment samples of biodiesel with photo
 Login/Join
 
Member
posted
So, we finally got cold weather here. I thought I would post a link to an informative photograph of some biodiesel samples. Here's how the samples were treated:

Sample one on the left:
*500mL premium quality washed and dried biodiesel made from gently used non-hydrogenated soybean oil.

*100mL kerosene, or 17% kerosene of the total volume. Or 20% kerosene, based on the original volume of biodiesel, take your choice.

*3x the recomended amount of Power Service DFS Cetane Boost, based on the volume of biodiesel, not total volume with kerosene. This is the white bottle available at virtually every Wal-Mart and truck stop around.

Note that sample one is totally clear and liquid, with some wax crystals settled to the bottom. It was 15F when this photo was taken.

Sample 2 in the middle:

*500 mL premo deluxe washed/dried soy biodiesel

*100 mL kerosene, no anti-gel additive at all

Note that sample two is totally opaque from waxing/crystalizing. The top 2/3 is still semi-liquid, but I'd hate to try to push that fuel through my VW, fuel line heater or not.

Sample 3 on the right:

300 mL premo deluxe washed/dried soy biodiesel and nothing else.

Note that sample 3 with no treatment or additives of any kind, is a solid. It turned completely opaque around freezing and was totally solid by 25F.

With a heated fuel filter and fuel line heater, I think I could run sample one type fuel indefinitely at 15F. To be safe, I would run more kerosene. To be ultra safe, I'd treat a batch, then chill it outside, then filter the liquid off and save the waxes for summer use, where it performs beautifully.

OK, here's the pic:



Finest regards,

troy

ImageWINTER~2.jpg (52 Kb, 230 downloads)
 
Location: north america somewhere close to the midwest, or not | Registered: May 29, 2004Report This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
what's all that white stuff on the table?
 
Registered: October 06, 2005Report This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by 95imp:
what's all that white stuff on the table?


The white stuff is complex crystalized dihydrogen oxide. It's a chemical solvent used widely in industry. Periodically, for reasons that are not widely understood, this industrial solvent falls out of the sky. This chemical has been found in solid, liquid and gaseous forms.

It's terrifically dangerous and can kill you in any number of gruesome ways. If you inhale too much, they call it drowning. If you have too much skin contact with the crystallized version, you die from something called hypothermia. If you're exposed to the superheated gaseous form, it's called a steam burn.

Somehow, this substance has been dumped into the residential water supply, causing you to become addicted to this dangerous industrial solvent. You almost certainly are now addicted to this product and would die in three or four days if you tried to give it up cold turkey. Industry has capitalized on this addiction by selling highly refined supplies of this solvent to keep the junkies happy. They call this bottled "water" and it is sold at a scandalous price in many retail outlets. But you and I know that it's really liquid dihydrogen oxide. Law enforcement does nothing about this whole obvious drug problem, probably because they are being paid off.

Both the liquid version and the crystal version somehow reduce the coefficient of friction between tire rubber and pavement, though the crystalized dihydrogen oxide is much worse in this respect. The result is reduced braking power, sometimes reduced to almost zero. This causes many thousands of deaths every year, yet the government seems slow to make the industrial solvent illegal, or even regulated. I'm sure this is because of some military/industrial-complex bribery/influence scandal.

Finest regards,

troy
 
Location: north america somewhere close to the midwest, or not | Registered: May 29, 2004Report This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
So , the question remains . What will keep biodiesel from gelling ? I know the first sample is far better than the others , but the fuel pickup in your tank is at the bottom and you will still have to use the cloudy/gelled stuff up to be able to ge to the good stuff floating on top . Is there a cold filtering process that can recover the higher gell portions prior to filling your tank ? If this could be done you can probably save this part of the fuel to be used as a summer fuel . I have played with the idea a little but have not had much luck in doing anything but plugging filters . I have a few other ideas I might try when it gets cold again , but we stay warm here most of the year .
 
Location: Crosby Tx. | Registered: June 14, 2005Report This Post
member

posted Hide Post
The next batch I do will be withthe liquid canola I have been getting for my SVO system. I already did one batch before and freezer tested it to -16C (2.9F) and it was still clear and flowing with no signs of waxcing. Another couple degrees lower and it did start to cloud, so liquid canola (rape seed)showed promise to
-12C (10.3F). This was straight B100, no additives. I tried the same test with a 50/50 mix with winter dino and got the exact same results, no changes. I did not try any diesel fuel additives to see if I could get it any lower yet,maybe next batch once my new reactor is properly set up.



** Biodiesel Glycerine Soap - The Guide
- on 5 continents helping people make & sell soap from the Biodiesel Glycerine.


 
Location: :-) Great White North eh ? | Registered: December 10, 2004Report This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by dodgeram:
Is there a cold filtering process that can recover the higher gell portions prior to filling your tank ? .


Yes, this is in fact called cold filtering, and I made reference to it in the original post. You just treat the fuel (when the fuel is warm, that seems to matter), then chill the fuel and syphon off the liquid part and leave the congealed waxes at the bottom. The congealed waxes make great summer fuel as mentioned. For colder temps, you will also need more petro winter diesel and/or kerosene.

Oh yeah, technically, the sample on the left (#1) has not gelled yet. Clouding is when you start to form wax crystals, gelling is the transition from a liquid to a solid. Sample one is still a liquid, even the waxy sludge responds to gravity when you tilt the container.

Good luck and have fun,

troy
 
Location: north america somewhere close to the midwest, or not | Registered: May 29, 2004Report This Post



Member
posted Hide Post
I am so behind on my winterizing. I am experiment with so many things that I'll just let y'all do the work on this one and use whatevr seems to work best for y'all...
 
Location: Victoria BC | Registered: November 24, 2004Report This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by troy:
quote:
Originally posted by 95imp:
what's all that white stuff on the table?


The white stuff is complex crystalized dihydrogen oxide.....


ahhh, i've seen this stuff in christmas specials.

since we're in the mid 70's for daytime highs and an overnight low in the mid 40's, i don't have much opportunity to see this solvent fall from the sky in this form Razz

thanks for clearing up the mystery
 
Registered: October 06, 2005Report This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Well, I tested my dual tank system yesterday, just in time for the cold.
I sealed off one baffle within the tank and now have one section for diesel/kero (for starting and warming up) and a larger section for biodiesel.
A copper coil runs coolant through the main tank and heats it up. Works great. Ran the engine on 75F bio in 45 deg F weather.
An interesting feature of this old military truck is a fuel viscosity compensating device on the IP. Built in the 1960's this engine was required to run on several different fuels, including gasoline (emergency use). The viscosity sensor adjusts the fuel delivery so that a fuel with less viscosity is delivered in greater amount. The heating values for the fuels specified for the engine are directly proportional to the viscosity. This way the power output of the engine remains the same regardless of the fuel used.
I added a sensor to the fuel viscosity compensator and was able to observe the action on a DVM.
When I switched fuel from diesel to bio and vise versa there was a 75 second delay before the old fuel had cleared the lines and filters. The device made a clear adjustment. Of course, biodiesel has a lower heating value than gasoline but much higher viscosity so the device actually works against it. (biodiesel is not one of the fuels specified for this engine).
The experiment shows the importance of switching the fuel return lines after the fuel selection. The return flow on this engine is about 1/2 gallon/minute.
With this dual tank system, no additives are needed for the BD in the winter.
 
Location: Meadows of Dan, Virginia | Registered: October 25, 2005Report This Post
member

posted Hide Post
cranetruck; once the frame is finito you do realise that that engine is going to make a FANTASTIC genset or cogenerator eh? Nice.



** Biodiesel Glycerine Soap - The Guide
- on 5 continents helping people make & sell soap from the Biodiesel Glycerine.


 
Location: :-) Great White North eh ? | Registered: December 10, 2004Report This Post
member
posted Hide Post
Below are three-scanned pdf files sent to me from Power service. It looks like Artic Express does work. To bad it’s not more readily available.

 
Location: Central Texas | Registered: May 12, 2005Report This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
this is in fact called cold filtering
???
Not to be picky, however calling this technique "cold filtering" is misleading. In fact it's called 'cold settling', the 'cold filtering' is the final stage of filtering the clear fraction without heating it. Settling uses gravity to seperate materials of different density, filtering uses mechanical means of seperation based on particle size and filters with specific porosity size. Let's not add to the confusion with misleading terms, eh?

I've used the same technique with good success. The oil is used canola. I'm adding 25% kerosene and letting the mix settle in the cold. At -3*F [the coldest it's ben so far this winter] the clear fraction is still liquid with no evidence of clouding.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Report This Post



Member
posted Hide Post
Cold settling works for me.

troy
 
Location: north america somewhere close to the midwest, or not | Registered: May 29, 2004Report This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
cold filtering

I use Cold Filtering, but then I use a filter bag to allow fast separation of the High MP oils from the low MP oils.
Oh BTW, I am using UCO in this process. A little slower due to the high viscosity when cold, but gravity is cheap and time is too. Wink

If you use cold settling, or cold filtering on your UCO feedstock, the biodiesel which is liquid at ambient temperatures will have good low temperature properties.

With cold settling of either the oil or the biodiesel, the solid oils/biodiesel can remain in the containers until they melt in spring and summer, when they will be good feedstock/fuel at those temperatures.
 
Location: Perth W.Australia | Registered: August 10, 2001Report This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  

Closed Topic Closed

Sponsors    Biodiesel and SVO Forums Home    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Biodiesel  Hop To Forums  General Biodiesel Discussion    Winter treatment samples of biodiesel with photo

© Maui Green Energy 2000 - 2014