BIODIESEL & SVO DISCUSSION FORUMS






Sponsors    Biodiesel and SVO Forums Home    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Biodiesel  Hop To Forums  General Biodiesel Discussion    Why 2007 & Newer ULSD Emission Vehicles Don't Like Biodiesel
Page 1 ... 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ... 33

Moderators: Shaun, The Trouts
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Why 2007 & Newer ULSD Emission Vehicles Don't Like Biodiesel
 Login/Join
 
Member
posted Hide Post
VW Races Ahead With Biodiesel
http://blog.wired.com/cars/200...tdi-cup-means-c.html
By Tony Borroz March 10, 2009

There are two givens in the auto industry these days (well, three, actually, since the automakers are in a heap of trouble): Cars must become more environmentally friendly and the best way to make eco-friendly cars that people want is to make them fun to drive.

Racing is fun and brings all sorts of valuable technology to our everyday rides. So, when Volkswagen started a single-make race series featuring their sweet Jetta diesels, we got excited because it will make the VWs everyone else drives that much better.

Now that VW is fueling those cars with biodiesel, we're really excited.

It is well-known in the automotive world that racing is a wellspring for innovation. If you want to make sure something Works with a capital double-u, take it to the track. If it works there, it'll work in the much more lenient world of street cars. Hell, Ferrari is based on this simple premise.

VW knows this too. Last year, it launched a race series exclusively for the Jetta TDI, which named Green Car Journal's Green Car of the Year. It isn't so much the fact it's the Jetta, or even VW, that makes this so interesting, but the fact they're running diesels.

Diesels make a whole bunch of sense in racing. Just ask Audi or Peugeot, which thoroughly dominated Le Mans with them last year. You get better mileage, bags and bags of torque and, if you want to be clever about it, fuel made from leftover french fry grease. That's the revelation that came to VW as it put together the 2009 TDI Cup season, which will see every car on the grid running a mixture that is 5 percent biodiesel.

OK, that's not a huge amount, but it's a start, and it follows Audi's experimentation with biodiesel at Le Mans. Clark Campbell, motorsport manager for Volkswagen of America, says the move "further demonstrates the feasibility of biodiesel as an alternative fuel source for American consumers and supports the clean and green racing of the Jetta TDI Cup series."

You can extrapolate this out to see where it leads. If it works in a Jetta on the track and can be fun, then it can work in a Jetta on the street and be fun. If it works in a Jetta on the street and is fun, then it could work in a proper sport scar and be even more fun. And VW can reliably run 5 percent bio-D now, it should be able to reliably up that percentage before long.

If someone builds a car that's as much fun as, say, a Toyota MR2 or Mazda Miata and runs on, say, 80 percent biodiesel made from used veggie oil, then the future will be very bright indeed.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Does it have to be WVO I have used coconut oil! it does real well. however it costs alot!


1999 F-250 Running B-50 and getting over 24 miles per Gallon. and getting +/- 380 ftlbs of torque from modifications HA HA HEH! OOH! RAH! Semper Fi!
 
Location: Redding | Registered: December 21, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
VW knows this too. Last year, it launched a race series exclusively for the Jetta TDI, which named Green Car Journal's Green Car of the Year. It isn't so much the fact it's the Jetta, or even VW, that makes this so interesting, but the fact they're running diesels.

Diesels make a whole bunch of sense in racing. Just ask Audi or Peugeot, which thoroughly dominated Le Mans with them last year. You get better mileage, bags and bags of torque and, if you want to be clever about it, fuel made from leftover french fry grease. That's the revelation that came to VW as it put together the 2009 TDI Cup season, which will see every car on the grid running a mixture that is 5 percent biodiesel.

OK, that's not a huge amount, but it's a start, and it follows Audi's experimentation with biodiesel at Le Mans. Clark Campbell, motorsport manager for Volkswagen of America, says the move "further demonstrates the feasibility of biodiesel as an alternative fuel source for American consumers and supports the clean and green racing of the Jetta TDI Cup series."

You can extrapolate this out to see where it leads. If it works in a Jetta on the track and can be fun, then it can work in a Jetta on the street and be fun. If it works in a Jetta on the street and is fun, then it could work in a proper sport scar and be even more fun. And VW can reliably run 5 percent bio-D now, it should be able to reliably up that percentage before long.
Isn't it ironic that the new 2009 VW is the first VW TDI limited to 5% biodiesel? The DPF technology is causing problems, and the 2009 is the LEAST green TDI to date.


'05 CRD B100
'01 TDi B100

 
Location: Colorado | Registered: March 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Isn't it ironic that the new 2009 VW is the first VW TDI limited to 5% biodiesel? The DPF technology is causing problems, and the 2009 is the LEAST green TDI to date.

While forum members might appreciate the irony, I doubt if we can do anything about it in this discussion.

Have you contacted VW about it?



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
quote:
Isn't it ironic that the new 2009 VW is the first VW TDI limited to 5% biodiesel? The DPF technology is causing problems, and the 2009 is the LEAST green TDI to date.

While forum members might appreciate the irony, I doubt if we can do anything about it in this discussion.
What do you mean "do anything about it"? We are limited here to just talking about it, but we could brain-storm ways to get around it, if that's what you mean.
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Have you contacted VW about it?
Regarding their propaganda? You have a contact?
 
Location: Colorado | Registered: March 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
quote:
quote:
Originally posted by UFO:The DPF technology is causing problems, and the 2009 is the LEAST green TDI to date.

Have you contacted VW about it?
You have a contact?

try Google



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



Member
posted Hide Post
Knock yourself out.
 
Location: Colorado | Registered: March 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
member
posted Hide Post
Anyone know what the National Biodiesel Board has to say on this low BD limit issue? I found some info on the site where they have been monitoring impacts, but nothing much of concern related. Ultimately their members / producers stand to lose the most.

Also I've seen some nice work done by the eff.org in the past using a fax based system that lets people fill out an online form then sends a canned letter to their representatives.

With the overwhelming tech guru crowd we have on here, it wouldn't be hard to build a similar type site to allow the general public to voice opinions "spam" to all the manufactures, EPA and your gov reps with a single click.

I'd donate time to this since I think it's something that needs to be addressed by those who came up with this master plan without looking at the long term impacts on the emerging bio fuels industry.

-Ken


Recycling & Green Fuels Research: www.altfuelsgroup.org
Ozone Eating Toys For Big Boys !!: www.suncoastexotics.com
Carefully Maintaining A Carbon Neutral Footprint...
 
Location: Southeastern Ohio | Registered: January 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by UFO:
Knock yourself out.
Naw, I couldn't care less what VW [or Ford, or GM, or Crys] does.

quote:
Anyone know what the National Biodiesel Board has to say on this low BD limit issue?
They don't seem to have much to say on anything important. Probably just another feel-good organization to collect dues, host a fancy website, print self-serving glossy newsletters, and basically do nothing of any real consequence.

Pardon me if I seem a bit cynical, however in the nearly four years I've been a member of this forum I've seen nothing of any consequence done at the national level to make biodiesel any sort of significant factor in reducing pollution. Most of the biodiesel produced in America is shipped overseas where it gets more profit for the traitorous companies sucking up our used fryer oil.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Pardon me if I seem a bit cynical, however in the nearly four years I've been a member of this forum I've seen nothing of any consequence done at the national level to make biodiesel any sort of significant factor in reducing pollution.


The fact that you are saying that at THIS forum is quite ironic. THIS IS a national international level "thing of consequence" making biodiesel a significant factor in reducing pollution.


Kumar Plocher
Yokayo Biofuels
Yokayo Biofuels Facebook page
.........../ \..............
fueling / R \ evolution since 2001
'''''''''''''/____\'''''''''''''''''''

Sustainable Biodiesel...
 
Location: Ukiah, CA USA | Registered: September 19, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by kumar:
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Pardon me if I seem a bit cynical, however in the nearly four years I've been a member of this forum I've seen nothing of any consequence done at the national level to make biodiesel any sort of significant factor in reducing pollution.


The fact that you are saying that at THIS forum is quite ironic. THIS IS a national international level "thing of consequence" making biodiesel a significant factor in reducing pollution.


Well said Kumar, because of this forum there are thousands upon thousands of gallons of bio being made all over the planet by the little guys.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
there are thousands upon thousands of gallons of bio being made all over the planet by the little guys.
that's nice, but millions of gallons were made in the US and exported instead of reducing pollution in N.American cities. If you were paying attention to the context of my statements you would have perhaps realized that the criticism was directed to the NBB for not doing j.s. to effectively promote biodiesel at the national level in the US. Nobody is criticizing the small scale producers and the home brewers, so don't get your feathers ruffled while missing the point.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
quote:
there are thousands upon thousands of gallons of bio being made all over the planet by the little guys.
that's nice, but millions of gallons were made in the US and exported instead of reducing pollution in N.American cities. If you were paying attention to the context of my statements you would have perhaps realized that the criticism was directed to the NBB for not doing j.s. to effectively promote biodiesel at the national level in the US. Nobody is criticizing the small scale producers and the home brewers, so don't get your feathers ruffled while missing the point.


I think for Biodiesel to be a viable factor. There has to be enough NEW and Used NON Fossil based Oils to feed the need as a fuel without taking away from feed stocks, which would eventually drive up costs. Like I said there is not enough to put a dent in the fuel supply and keep it cost effective yet. Including GREEN ALGAE!


1999 F-250 Running B-50 and getting over 24 miles per Gallon. and getting +/- 380 ftlbs of torque from modifications HA HA HEH! OOH! RAH! Semper Fi!
 
Location: Redding | Registered: December 21, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
quote:
there are thousands upon thousands of gallons of bio being made all over the planet by the little guys.
that's nice, but millions of gallons were made in the US and exported instead of reducing pollution in N.American cities. If you were paying attention to the context of my statements you would have perhaps realized that the criticism was directed to the NBB for not doing j.s. to effectively promote biodiesel at the national level in the US. Nobody is criticizing the small scale producers and the home brewers, so don't get your feathers ruffled while missing the point.


As far as I am concerned I could not possibly care less what the NBB does, to me they are absolutely irrevelant, they are in place to keep themselves in place, and I did not miss your point, it is just that to me it is meaningless as the NBB will never, ever be any kind of mouth piece for the home brewer no matter what we say or do.
Trying to make the NBB into a mouthpiece for the little guy is like getting Washington to work for the taxpayer.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
I could not possibly care less what the NBB does, to me they are absolutely irrevelant


I agree completely. They are irrelevant at all levels.

For biodiesel to be viable in the US, the biodiesel produced in the US has to be used in N.America. The NBB - BS team is doing little or nothing to make that happen.

A few homebrewers using 100% BD is insignificant in terms of reducing urban pollution.

Instead of screwing around with misguided techo-fixes like DPF filters, use ALL the used VO feedstock in the US to make biodiesel to be mixed with ALL diesel fuel sold in US cities. B5 in 20 vehicles reduces pollution more than B100 in one vehicle and ULSD in 19 vehicles.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
With all of this talk on commercial grade B-100, I looked into it. There are some distributors in my area. they charge at least $1.00 or more per gallon then diesel. Your guaranteed that it meets ATSM standards. Your not guaranteed of the age of product being sold. I tested all of them and none of them passed. I actually bought samples did my own tests. Found glycerin levels above 2%, and then sent it to a certified testing center in Sacramento.
I am also looking into compressed natural gas. And the program gas to liquid technology that a handful of companies are looking into.


1999 F-250 Running B-50 and getting over 24 miles per Gallon. and getting +/- 380 ftlbs of torque from modifications HA HA HEH! OOH! RAH! Semper Fi!
 
Location: Redding | Registered: December 21, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I looked into companies that are using a type of cracking technology for the VO, After the process it tests just like Diesel! Unfortunately it is way too expensive to be used in regular market. and their compliant is that there is not enough product VO to meet 1% demand.


1999 F-250 Running B-50 and getting over 24 miles per Gallon. and getting +/- 380 ftlbs of torque from modifications HA HA HEH! OOH! RAH! Semper Fi!
 
Location: Redding | Registered: December 21, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
So maybe I am going about this the wrong way? How much New Vegetable oil do we (USA) consume in a day, regardless of use? and how much Diesel do we (USA) Consume in a day?


1999 F-250 Running B-50 and getting over 24 miles per Gallon. and getting +/- 380 ftlbs of torque from modifications HA HA HEH! OOH! RAH! Semper Fi!
 
Location: Redding | Registered: December 21, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post



Member
posted Hide Post
I'd be willing to bet diesel out paces vegoil by several orders of magnitude.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by fabricator:
I'd be willing to bet diesel out paces vegoil by several orders of magnitude.

I could only guess the same. I currently consume about 30 gallons per week of fuel. I can't imagine eating enough deep fried foods in a week to account for 30 gallons of veg oil.
 
Location: central virginia | Registered: March 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 ... 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ... 33 
 

Sponsors    Biodiesel and SVO Forums Home    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Biodiesel  Hop To Forums  General Biodiesel Discussion    Why 2007 & Newer ULSD Emission Vehicles Don't Like Biodiesel

© Maui Green Energy 2000 - 2014