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quote:
Originally posted by WesleyB:
Anything the Israeli government reports in science like a biodiesel reaction that produces almost a 100% biodiesel reaction product in ten seconds is another scam.


If it's a fraud then it will be exposed when other scientists attempt to replicate the results. That's how science works.

"The replication crisis in science has just begun. It will be big."

"Summary: After a decade of slow growth beneath public view, the replication crisis in science begins breaking into public view. First psychology and biomedical studies, now spreading to many other fields — overturning what we were told is settled science, the foundations of our personal behavior and public policy. Here is an introduction to the conflict (there is pushback), with the usual links to detailed information at the end, and some tentative conclusions about effects on public’s trust of science. It’s early days yet, with the real action yet to begin.

“Men only care for science so far as they get a living by it, and that they worship even error when it affords them a subsistence.”
— Goethe, from Conversations of Goethe with Eckermann and Soret"

https://wattsupwiththat.com/20...-replication-crisis/



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi John,

quote:
Originally posted by John Galt:
If it's a fraud then it will be exposed when other scientists attempt to replicate the results. That's how science works...“Men only care for science so far as they get a living by it, and that they worship even error when it affords them a subsistence.”








 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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NEW DELHI: To beat the Supreme Court ban on large diesel vehicles, Global auto major Mercedes Benz has proposed to shift its diesel cars and other vehicles in India to the environment friendly bio-diesel.

"Mercedes has given me a letter that they can use 100% bio-diesel in their cars and buses," Road transport and highways minister Nitin Gadkari said on Wednesday.


Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatime...t&utm_campaign=cppst



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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AIS Data Tracks Unusual Biodiesel Shipment to U.S.

2016-05-04

[By Will Martin, Analyst, Biofuels & Susan Olson, Managing Director, Agriculture & Biofuels]

On April 27, 2016, Genscape Vesseltracker detected a shipment of 4,200 tons (about 1.3 million gallons) of biodiesel from Australia arriving at the Texas Terminals Wharf in the Houston area. The Stolt Sun vessel carried product that originated from the ports of Adelaide and Fremantle in Australia.

According to data from the EIA, the U.S. hasn’t seen imports of biodiesel from Australia since January 2013, and the shipments from Australia have only occasionally occurred in the EIA’s recorded history (February 2012 and May 2011).

According to the 2015 USDA FAS GAIN report, Australia only produced about 17 million gallons of biodiesel in 2014. When the report was issued in August 2015, the expectation was that there would be 26 million gallons produced in 2015. The USDA also reported that only four of the eight biodiesel plants in Australia were operating at that time.

U.S. imports would suggest little Australian demand for biodiesel and favorable economics stateside with the current regulatory incentives, even with the nearly two-month journey.

The Blender’s Tax Credit, increased Renewable Fuel Standard volumes, and the value of Low Carbon Fuel Standard credits are driving increased U.S. consumption of biodiesel in 2016. A big question for the industry is how much of that will come from non-U.S. versus U.S. sources. Seeing another source of imports that wasn’t in the market in 2014 and 2015 could be an indication of the strength of imports in fulfilling increased demand.

Genscape offers an AIS-based Global Biodiesel Monitor to provide stakeholders with access to key international shipment information, delivering a more complete picture of biodiesel and renewable diesel flows worldwide.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Teams of undergraduate students huddled quietly around the gray metal desks in the teaching labs at Harvard’s Science Center. Each group was creating a calorimeter out of a used soda can and scavenged Styrofoam cups to determine the energy density and efficiency of the biodiesel they had extracted the week before from waste fryer oil provided by Annenberg Dining Hall.
http://news.harvard.edu/gazett...on-but-more-to-come/



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
... Harvard’s ... Annenberg Dining Hall.


Wow, blast from the past -- that brings back some memories! Smile No-brainer way to make intro chem a little more interesting.

Cheers, John
 
Registered: June 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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2019 Ford Ranger: Yes, It's Returning!

Expect a diesel and a base price below $25K, but no Splash edition.

May 2016 By CAR AND DRIVER

What It Is: The return of the less-than-gigantic Ford pickup. Ford currently sells this mid-sizer just about everywhere except here. But that is about to change in response to the strong-selling Chevy Colorado and GMC Canyon. The Ranger will also spawn a new Ford Bronco SUV, which will offer some competition to the Jeep Wrangler. Broncos should arrive in 2020 with a starting price of $30,000.

Why It Matters: The sales potential is significant. Toyota has been quietly selling gobs of Tacomas—just shy of 180,000 in 2015. And GM sparked new life in the class, selling more than 100,000 Coloranyons last year. In its heyday, the Ranger shamed them all, selling nearly 350,000 in 1999.

Platform: Our Ranger will use the same body-on-frame construction as the truck sold elsewhere in the world. Like GM’s mid-sizers, it’s only slightly smaller than its big brother; the crew cab is actually longer than a base F-150. But GM has proved that even big small trucks can sell without cannibalizing sales from the full-size lineup.

Powertrain: The only engine currently offered in the global Ranger that would likely come to the American market is the 3.2-liter five-cylinder diesel. It’s available in the full-size Transit van and could help the Ranger take away the title of “most efficient pickup” from the 31-highway-mpg diesel Colorado/Canyon twins. Expect an EcoBoost four-cylinder as well as a naturally aspirated gas V-6 in the U.S. lineup. A diesel Bronco sounds pretty good to us, too.

http://www.caranddriver.com/ph...iting-for-feature#11



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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2016 Ford Ranger line available in Australia





http://www.ford.com.au/commerc...cQrvQod984Cfg#step=1






 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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IIT Delhi students create device that turns waste cooking oil into biodiesel
http://www.hindustantimes.com/...YzowPngq88OkbpI.html



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Celebrating international biodiesel day – 11th August

On international biodiesel day, we review some of the latest cutting edge technologies being used to create biodiesel from sustainable sources such as plants, algae and other microbes.

Helen Whitaker 11 Aug 2016

The depletion of oil reserves has led to the development of renewable alternatives to petroleum products such as biodiesel. Historically, biodiesel has been extracted from vegetable oil or animal fats by reacting with alcohol to produce alkyl esters that can be used in conventional engines. However, producing biodiesel from the food chain competes with agricultural land use for food production.

Biotechnological research into biodiesel production therefore focusses on breeding crops for high lipid content, whilst the cultivation of algae, yeasts and other microbes are increasingly explored as a source of lipids. BioMed Central’s biotechnology journals showcase the latest research in renewable lipid and biodiesel production.

In Biotechnology for Biofuels, Abdullah et al. present a transcriptome analysis of Camelina sativa, an emerging oilseed crop for biodiesel production to identify gene networks associated with triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis, with a view to future genetic improvement of strains to produce more lipids.

Xue et al., write in Microbial Cell Factories about engineering a Chlorella algal strain to increase malic enzyme activity and subsequent lipid accumulation with potential applications in biodiesel production.

Reporting in BMC Biotechnology, Lamers et al. screen oleaginous yeasts to find a robust strain that can produce triacylglycerides from carbon sources, when triggered by nutrient limitation. In a similar vein, Signori et al. writing in Microbial Cell Factories, seek to optimise the growth of oleaginous yeast on crude glycerol, to avoid a lag phase in growth caused by impurities in the substrate.

Other microbes can also be persuaded to produce biodiesel including cyanobacteria Kato et al. present a strain of cyanobacteria, Synechococcus elongate, that excretes Free Fatty Acids into the culture medium, with the added benefit that lipids do not need to be extracted from the cells (an energy intensive step).

Many of these studies involve bioengineering of plants and microbes on a laboratory scale and the greatest challenge to producing renewable biodiesel is the scaling up of these novel synthetic technologies on an industrial scale.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Biodiesel: The great crash of Australia's 'fish and chip cooking oil' renewable fuel industry
http://www.abc.net.au/news/201...rket-crashed/8121100



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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