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The United States is the Saudi Arabia of coal, most "experts" agree we have in excess of 100 years of known reserves, most of our electricity is generated by coal, every single barrel of of mid east or Venezuelan oil we can offset with domestic coal is a good thing, when we get off despot oil, then we can worry bout the green thing.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Where I am they have been secretly trying to slow down the uptake of air conditioning because of the added drain on the power supply. ...There has been a big drive here of late for people to install solar panels on their roof. It's been touted as yet another green, save the planet type thing.
This should almost be a 'no brainer'. If the sun shines enough to require air conditioning then placing PV panels on the roof not only intercepts the solar energy before it penetrates into the building, but it produces enough electricity to offset much of the electric load for air conditioning during the time of the day when it's needed most.

If the US had spent the money to put PV panels on large flat roofs across the sunbelt, instead of pissing it away on Mideast military misadventures to secure more Arab oil, then they could have saved enough energy to significantly reduce oil imports from the Arabs. Another illustration of why 'military intelligence' is an oxymoron.

quote:
I hear the car manufacturers are looking to get into the landfill business with the leftovers of some old electric car batteries
I wonder why? In Canada the recycle rate on vehicle batteries is about 95%. The recycled components are used to make more batteries. Sounds like another obvious problem of people being unable to connect the dots.

Oh well, if humans were an intelligent species then we wouldn't have the problems we do. I suspect that about 90% of humanity is too stupid to do anything but eat and phuck.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fabricator:
The United States is the Saudi Arabia of coal, most "experts" agree we have in excess of 100 years of known reserves, most of our electricity is generated by coal, every single barrel of of mid east or Venezuelan oil we can offset with domestic coal is a good thing, when we get off despot oil, then we can worry bout the green thing.
What about the particulate, heavy metal and radioactive pollution from coal fired electric plants? Is it OK as long as it's in someone elses back-yard? Isn't that sorta like having a pissing section in the shallow end of the swimming pool?



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by john galt:
[QUOTE] I suspect that about 90% of humanity is too stupid to do anything but eat and phuck.


But admittedly.. there is nothing better in life :P
 
Registered: March 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is a perfect example of typical biodiesel misinformation.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Biodiesel deep fryer grease conversion kits for vegetable cars create a fun and economical way to fuel your diesel car

http://www.healthyfinancialhab...uel-your-diesel-car/

A car the runs on used vegetable oil? That is the typical response that most people will give when informed about the bio diesel technology that exist today.

Biodiesel is created when a person takes a used oil waste product, such as deep fryer oil, filters and refines it into a useable fuel that can be burned in most diesel powered engines.

Fueling a vehicle using this method is incredibly effective, costing only pennies per gallon. The average cost of producing biodiesel is less than $.50 per gallon. This means that you can run your operate your vehicle for just pennies per day. As the future price of fuel becomes more unpredictable every day, creating an alternative energy biodiesel car is a great idea.

In order to run biodiesel, you will need two things: An oil filtration or biodiesel distillation system and a Diesel or truck that has been converted using a biodiesel kit. There are several websites on the internet who offer both of these.

When it comes to using Biodiesel fuel, there is some work involved in creating the fuel. You must first collect the used oil, perhaps from local restaurants, and then spend the time converting and bottling your fuel.

With a small investment and a little time, you can create an alternative fuel to run your vehicle. Check back with Healthy Financial Habits for the latest ideas in saving money.

Author: John Zinsky



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fabricator:
The United States is the Saudi Arabia of coal, most "experts" agree we have in excess of 100 years of known reserves, most of our electricity is generated by coal, every single barrel of of mid east or Venezuelan oil we can offset with domestic coal is a good thing, when we get off despot oil, then we can worry bout the green thing.


You have 100 Years of coal Now at its present consumption level.
I doubt that you will have much more than 25 years worth (If that!) if you replace the energy you are importing in Liquid fuel with energy that is derived from coal.

I'm sure those that could be bothered could translate the relationship of a gallon of oil to an equivalent energy value in coal and further cross reference that to a KW of electricity delivered to the end user. The savvy may also like to work out the losses incurred through battery charges, the fact that batteries on average require 50% more input than what they store and then the conversion losses in the vehicle. Work those numbers out against the tonnage of estimated coal reserves and I'm more than sure the number that comes out is not going to be within a bulls roar of 100 years.

And as said, it does little if anything for the environmental situation that is ( was?) flavor of the month.

I'm pretty sure that the amount of coal needed to fuel present demands and that which would be required by vehicles all adds up to more coal than most people can begin to imagine and would put a massive dent in any calculations as to how many years any country with coal reserves could remain self sufficient.

I suppose if the US does go to electric Vehicles, we can expect an invasion in oz so they can free us from the tyranny and whatever they are in the middle east for which as we all know, has nothing to do with the oil there. Roll Eyes

I believe there is every likelihood that the next energy system, particularly for vehicles, has already been worked out. All this talk of electric, bio fuels, hydrogen.... Whatever, is just a feel good distraction the oil companies and governments are allowing the population to have while they extract every last cent out of the current oil infrastructure and economies.

As soon as whatever other system becomes more profitable than oil, it will be rolled out as some new miracle discovery. It will then be revealed that Farmer Brown from baccabuggery discovered it in 1923 and the patent was bought by an oil company or government and was " Lost" or "Forgotten" about till just now.
No doubt it will be simple, clean and efficient which is not what big money and governments want in the hands of the people while they can still hold them to ransom with oil .

Sounds all conspiracy theory and cloak and dagger which to me is actually what gives it a good measure of possibility! Roll Eyes
Nothing to me anymore is beyond spin doctoring and corruption.
 
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Imperium biodiesel plant fined for violations
http://www.seattlepi.com/local...rium_violations.html
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ABERDEEN, Wash. -- The Washington Department of Labor & Industries has fined Imperium Grays Harbor $11,700 for safety violations stemming from a Dec. 2 explosion at the biodiesel plant.

The Hoquiam-based refinery was cited this week for 11 serious violations, defined as those with potential to cause death or serious injury.

On Dec. 2 a 10,000-gallon glycerin tank exploded when increased levels of sulfuric acid created a reaction that overpressurized the tank. No one was injured in the explosion.

Spokesman John Williams told the Daily World Friday that Imperium is reviewing the findings. CEO John Plaza said in January the company was taking steps to prevent accidents.

State regulators found employees weren't properly trained or warned of certain chemical hazards.

The company has 15 days to appeal the citation.

---

Information from: The Daily World, http://www.thedailyworld.com



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Can we now assume biodiesel may work as a fuel for a diesel engine?
 
Registered: March 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Reece123:
Can we now assume biodiesel may work as a fuel for a diesel engine?

Biodiesel should be fine for older Diesel engines.
It has troubles with 2007 and newer engines with DPF filters, or in particular an in-cylinder post combustion injection cycle.

The question is whether the new 2011 models that are coming out shortly will have dropped the DPF and have better biodiesel compatibility. Or if they use an exhaust manifold/pipe injector for the DPF Regen.

And for that, discuss the DPF with a "competent" vendor.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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First commercial biodiesel produced in Alaska

On June 9, the first commercial biodiesel was produced in the state of Alaska. Alaska Green Waste Solutions began production in its new Anchorage biodiesel plant and is celebrating with a grand opening on Thursday, June 17. The plant has a capacity of 1,000 gallons per day and is the perfect solution for disposing of waste cooking oil and producing a clean, reusable fuel in any location.

Constructed in Salem, Ore., by Pacific Biodiesel Technologies and JVNW, the plant was disassembled for shipment and reassembled in Anchorage. Built in six shipping containers, the facility includes storage for feedstock, biodiesel and glycerin, utilities and the biodiesel produces system. It can be shipped anywhere, assembled on site and ready for production quickly.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jun. 22--PITTSBORO -- Using low-quality waste grease to create high-quality biodiesel will be possible with leading-edge technology developed by Piedmont Biofuels LLC, which markets itself as a leader in biofuels in North Carolina.
"This new process of using enzymes to produce biodiesel will increase yields, decrease waste, and allows producers to use lower-cost feedstocks," said Greg Austic of Piedmont Biofuels. "This ground-breaking technology will create more valuable co-products, and will allow existing producers to double their biodiesel output."



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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IFT’s Biodiesel Booster Just in Time for Higher Blends
http://domesticfuel.com/2010/0...e-for-higher-blends/
by John Davis – July 5th, 2010

A St. Louis-based company has recently finished testing of a product that not only will boost the performance of biodiesel … just in time as more people look at using higher blends of the green fuel … but some it is being made from renewable feedstocks.

International Fuel Technology’s Director of Science and Technology, Sergio Trindade, explains IFT’s DiesoLiFT 10, designed to reduce harmful emissions and maintenance costs when mixed with diesel fuel and biodiesel fuel blends, and DiesoLiFT BD-3, formulated to give biodiesel superior oxidation stability and deposit control benefits, optimizes the compression combustion that takes place in the engine.

“Which means the surface exposed to combustion is much larger than the ordinary injection system without our additive.”

He goes on to explain that this optimization becomes more important as the industry moves to higher blends of biodiesel, such as B20.

“When you get to those higher biodiesel concentrations, you lose some of the mileage. The use of our product helps makeup for that loss in mileage.”

If you’re wondering if you would be replacing the cost of the biodiesel with the cost of IFT’s additives, Trindade says while the additives produce a 4.5 percent increase in mileage, you’ll spend only that first 1 percent to use the additive. That means it still returns about four-to-one on the investment.

Trindade adds they are making a portion of IFT’s DiesoLiFT 10 and DiesoLiFT BD-3 from some of the same renewable feedstocks used for biodiesel and hopes to increase those feedstocks in the future.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The numbers don't add up do they?
==============================================================================



Could use of biodiesel stimulate the economy?
http://www.wlbt.com/Global/story.asp?S=12763743

By Ashley Conroy
07/06/2010

MADISON COUNTY, MS (WLBT) - Economic opportunities in rural Mississippi could be on the horizon. It's part of an initiative from U.S. Department of Agriculture to promote rural development and the use of biodiesel nationwide.

Two under secretaries from the USDA toured Bruce Craft Farms in Madison County Tuesday to announce a $213,800 federal grant from through the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) that will be given to eight Mississippi farmers to purchase new equipment.

Bruce Craft has owned and operated his families land since 1983. They harvest corn, cotton, and soy beans.

Craft says since Hurricane Katrina struck nearly five years ago, they started using used vegetable oil as part of their fuel to harvest their land because diesel fuel soared more than $4 dollars a gallon.

"To be honest we started trying to do it, to keep the cost of our fuel down," Craft said.

In one of their older tractors, Craft says they've been able to harvest production with the fuel tank filled with 37 percent used vegetable oil.

However, he says the production of their alternative fuel has slowed since gas prices have gone down and a federal credit, that paid back .99 cents for every gallon of biodiesel fuel produced, stopped.

"It costs us about a dollar a gallon to make it, so really it's not cost effective right now," Craft said.

In the future, he hopes to reduce regular diesel use by 20 percent.

USDA Under Secretary for Rural Development Dallas Tonsager says using renewable energy sources in America will help bounce back the economy.

"We tend to want to transport things long distances. Well what's wrong with producing it locally and selling it locally. It makes a lot of sense and it keeps your local economy going," Tonsager said.

"We're constantly working with private land owners to improve the way we grow crops and the way we conduct our business," USDA Under Secretary of Natural Resources and Environment Harris Sherman said.

The Craft family are firm believers that if everyone used even a small amount of alternative fuels everyday, the economy could potentially take care of itself.

"If we can just replace 10 percent of our energy with alternative crops, that's 10 percent of our money that's not going out of the country," Craft said.


Biodiesel manufacturer could close
http://charlotte.news14.com/co...facturer-could-close
07/06/2010 04:29 PM
By: Stephanie Stilwell

GREENSBORO -- A Greensboro biodiesel company is falling on tough times after a government subsidy ran out in December and the sale of their product dropped. Patriot Biodiesel started back in 2008 with hopes of turning vegetable oil into alternative fuel. But now, company leader's aren't sure how much longer they can last like this.

“This building was buzzing. It was every motor, every pump was just going crazy,” said Gabe Neeriemer, co-owner of Patriot Biodiesel.

But now, most of the time these machines are kept off. Not because they can't make biodiesel, but because there is no one to buy it. “ People aren't buying biodiesel, not because they don't like biodiesel but because the price is too high, much higher than the price of diesel now ,” Neeriemer said. “Our price stays the same, no matter what's going on with the price of diesel, and the price of diesel has dropped considerably.”

Add to that a $1 federal tax credit that wasn't renewed and this local business is struggling to survive. “We don't rely on the tax credit to be profitable,” Neeriemer said. “But we use the tax credit to offset the government regulations and taxes already placed on fuel.”

Officials say the benefits of using biodiesel are clear. “This is one of the major things that can help that can help the environment. Biodiesel, you reduce emissions, you cut down on a lot of the factors that are causing the ozone layer to deteriorate,” Patriot Biodiesel co-owner Brad Duncan said.

But if things don't change, Neeriemer says the industry could be in big trouble. “Every biodiesel company in the nation is struggling right now," he said. "Most have closed their doors, 80 percent of biodiesel refineries have shut down and the 20 percent that are still open are operating under 50 percent capacity. Most are operating under 20 percent capacity, just enough to keep the doors open.”

As for Patriot Biodiesel, the next few weeks will determine whether or not they'll close their doors too.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Good quotes about prices... if they were only "real".
I noticed the estimate for Algae Oil was $10-$30 a gallon.

It does indicate that Ethanol should be able to compete with Biodiesel on just a price basis.
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Officials say the benefits of using biodiesel are clear. “This is one of the major things that can help that can help the environment. Biodiesel, you reduce emissions, you cut down on a lot of the factors that are causing the ozone layer to deteriorate,” Patriot Biodiesel co-owner Brad Duncan said.
How did we jump from Carbon Dioxide to Ozone? What we don't need more of is bad science.
quote:
but because there is no one to buy it. “ People aren't buying biodiesel, not because they don't like biodiesel but because the price is too high, much higher than the price of diesel now ,” Neeriemer said.
From talking to people, the reason people aren't buying more biodiesel (or E85) is much more complicated.
  • Availability is certainly an issue. The nearest B99/E85 vendor is about 15 miles from my house. It is much more difficult to find E85/B100 on a "road trip".
  • Lack of manufacture support. I'm convinced that 99% of cars on the road would run on E85, some possibly needing a software update. Yet, the auto vendors aren't providing it as an option. Diesel manufacturers are only warranting their vehicles for B5, B10, or in extreme cases B20.
  • Oil Dilution. Major issue with 2007 and newer vehicles. Potentially could cause confusion with older vehicles. If only I could keep my oil level from going down as I drive!!!!
  • Clogged Fuel Filters, Injectors, and etc. Probably more of a fallout from the home Biodiesel Production than anything else. However, Biodiesel is also hard on seals and hoses.
  • Lack of Diesel vehicles on the road, and the "premium" cost new. This is perhaps the biggest issue. Even companies like VW only sell, perhaps 1/10 of their vehicles with Diesel engines. The big Pickup market (and commercial trucks) is the primary Diesel market in the USA. The only choice for the small pickup market are "conversions" and ancient trucks. You can't burn Biodiesel if there aren't the vehicles on the road that run on it.
  • The Demise of the "Shade Tree Mechanics". I live life with the belief that I can fix anything that I break. But, today I fear that I'm in the minority.
  • Along with the lack of tinkerers, there is the set it and forget it ideology. SVO/WVO isn't a set it and forget it fuel, and B100 may or may not be in that category. Driving a 30 yr old car certainly isn't.
Add it all up, and price is only a small factor.

I've talked to close relatives, and none burn B99/B100 in their Diesel pickups.

Essentially they refuse to put an "experimental fuel" that will "void warranties" in their $30,000 pickups. I'm convinced that they would pay a 10% premium for the bio-fuel if the manufacturers supported or recommended it.

Personally I'm convinced that Biodiesel is a superior fuel to Diesel due to the increased lubricity, but perhaps should be run with preheating and blends such as B50, B80, or B80K20.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jatropha biodiesel in Nepal
http://www.myrepublica.com/por...etails&news_id=21457
by: MAYA CHHETRI Nepal Republic Media Pvt. Ltd.

Forced by frequent fuel crisis and obligations to reduce green house gas emissions an increasing number of countries are switching to the use of ethanol and biodiesel as fuel additive. Brazil leads in the production and consumption of sugarcane-based ethanol claimed to be seven times more efficient than corn ethanol that is being used in the US. Europe heads the production of biodiesel coming commonly from sunflower and rapeseeds. In the US, it is the soybean and residue oil from cooking industry that supply feedstock for biodiesel. In Brazil, biodiesel is sourced from castor and soybean. East Asian countries rely on palm oil.

Jatropha, a non-edible plant oil source of biodiesel is yet to make regular entry to fuel market. A 10-percent blend of Jatropha-based biodiesel with petro-diesel was reportedly tested in the train running between Delhi and Amritsar in India in 2003. Similar test was also performed on Air New Zealand Boeing 747-400’s Rolls-Royce RB211 engine using 50:50 mix of Jatropha refined oil with Jet A1 fuel on December 30, 2008.

Use of biodiesel as transport fuel to a level of 20 percent (B20) with petro-diesel is technically proven mix recommended for conventional vehicle. Use of pure biodiesel (B100) in vehicle requires engine modification. Despite the technical potential to substitute fossil fuel, the position of biodiesel in the fuel market will be decided above all by its price competitiveness.

Commercial viability of biodiesel depends essentially on the price and quality of feedstock (seeds/raw material), the efficiency of extraction technology, market demand for pressed oil cake, and glycerin derived as by-products.

Price of feedstock is decided by average seed yield and percentage of oil content in the seeds. Higher oil yield is also equally a function of efficient extraction technology. Generally, the types of extraction technology in use are mechanical, and chemical or the solvent extraction. Mechanical method is less efficient and leaves a significant amount of oil in the pressed cakes. Optimum oil from seeds can be extracted by chemical process/solvent method. This method is recommended for large-scale production because of its cost. In Nepal, solvent extraction is used for producing edible oils from soybean and sunflower seeds.

Similarly, market demand for pressed cake or its price for that matter, to use as bio-fertilizer depends on the productivity responses of crops. Jatropha farming for biodiesel will not make economic sense in the absence of market for pressed cake in which case biodiesel price will be way far beyond the subsidy level that the state may support or sustain, and Jatropha seeds have no other uses.

Whether biodiesel is economically viable is yet to be answered. Nepal has seen some efforts to promoting Jatropha based biofuel since the 1990s. By this time, many of Jatropha plantations have reached harvesting stage that are in the 5th to 10th year of plantation particularly in Khairenitar, Hetauda, and in some areas of Siraha, Sunsari and Rupandehi districts. With a very rare exception, seed yields in all these plantations have been less than 500 gram per tree against the expectation of 3-4 kilograms per tree.

Similarly, oil yield by expeller (mechanical) method has also been too low ranging from seven percent to a maximum of 16 percent, which means a minimum of seven kilograms of seeds are needed to extract one liter of oil. The maximum yield of 16 percent was obtained from a more efficient expeller set up with the biodiesel plant at Ramnagar of Chitwan and Jhumsa of Palpa district under the grant of Alternative Energy Promotion Center. In these expellers, seeds are steamed to increase moisture level before they are expelled. Yet, oil yield was too low. In Chitwan, 100 liter of biodiesel was produced from 700 kilogram of Jatropha seeds (14 percent) and in Palpa it was 300 liters from 2600 kilograms of seeds (12 percent).Taking these figures and the prevailing input prices as the basis for financial analysis, biodiesel will cost over Rs 165/liter. Assuming 30 percent oil yield from these relatively cheaper plants will still cost over Rs 100/liter. These are likely prices of biodiesel in the absence of supportive intervention from the state.

Chemical analysis of Jatropha seeds (solvent extraction method) conducted recently at Nepal Academy of Science and Technology (NAST) found oil content in the range from 22.7 percent to 36 percent in the seeds collected from Siraha and Rolpa districts respectively. The test result indicated that level of oil content in the seeds corresponds to altitudes. Low oil percentage was found in the lower altitude and high percentage in the higher altitude.

Simple expellers that were thought appropriate for operating at local levels are no longer recommendable while solvent extraction method is a kind of more centralized production system appropriate for large investors.

Contrary to what has been widely propagated about the potential of Jatropha to grow on any type of soil, the seed yield results from plantations in Nepal has been very disappointing. Such results are also due to plantations being carried out in the manner as if they are just part of afforestation or bio-engineering program. Even with maximum seed yield, it is hard to expect over Rs 100 from a Jatropha tree in the 6/7 year of plantation at current price. Commercial cultivation is thus not attractive where choices for other crop farming are available. Jatropha farming may only be a good option for absentee landlords. The apprehension about food crisis in the event of growing fuel crop appears unfounded at least in the context of Nepal.

In the present context, biodiesel in Nepal is not viable and the question is if and how it can be made viable. What amount of state subsidy and in what form will be required to make it competitive with diesel price? How much will that cost the nation and whether it will be justifiable?

The viability of biodiesel will all depend on the state policy, plan and program formulated on the basis of actual and primary data as the secondary data are proving a myth and hypothetical and failing to match with the ground reality.

chhetri.maya@gmail.com



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jatropha was a bit of a fad over here some years back. The story was you could get good yields growing it on crap land. Which as the story says it just isn't true.

To get good yields you need good land and other crops are more productive.

The people of Bouganville use straight coconut oil which makes for a very cheap fuel for those in the tropics.
 
Location: Nimbin Australia | Registered: December 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I think the confusion with Jatropha was that it will grow in a variety of conditions. Wet, Dry, etc. But, what people failed to mention is that the yields drop as might be expected in extremely dry conditions.

And, of course, Jatropha also is supposed to have lots of problems with COLD which eliminates it from being a viable crop for 3/4 of the USA.

I did read about one company which has taken seeds from mountain regions in Mexico and Central America with the hopes of introducing cold tolerant Jatropha.

http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/...-us-for-cultivation/
http://discovermagazine.com/20...i-business-nightmare

The last issue, of course, is harvesting. While manual labor may be ok for harvesting in India, it is not practical for mass production in the USA where production is measured less by gallons per acre and more by hundreds or thousands of acres per farmer.

Keep in mind that some of the most productive land in the USA from this century was considered waste-land last century as the early American Colonists completely ignored the Great Plains as they made the lengthy trek to the West Coast.

If we can maintain an equitable water distribution, perhaps new land will be opened to intense agriculture. That is, of course, if cities don't continue to raid farmlands from water resources.

Perhaps cities and rural areas will benefit from Deep Brackish Water wells in the 21st century. But even that is a cause for concern.
http://wrri.nmsu.edu/conf/brac...MBWWreport_FINAL.pdf
http://wrri.nmsu.edu/tbndrc/inland.html
http://aquadoc.typepad.com/wat...ed-consequences.html

WE NEED TO GET THE US AND GLOBAL HUMAN POPULATION GROWTH IN CHECK.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Canola oil would qualify for biodiesel mandate-EPA
http://af.reuters.com/article/...dAFN2726028220100727

Tue Jul 27, 2010 3:47pm GMT

* Meets 50 pct GHG reduction requirement

* EPA hearing comments on canola oil data

WINNIPEG Manitoba, July 27 (Reuters) - Biodiesel made from canola oil would emit 50 percent less greenhouse gas than petroleum diesel fuel, which would make it eligible for the U.S. mandate to increase renewable fuel production, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

EPA data that compares greenhouse gas emissions between biodiesel and conventional diesel, released on Monday, shows canola oil would meet a key eligibility requirement for the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard program.

"These results, if finalized, would justify authorizing the generation of biomass-based diesel ... produced by the canola oil biodiesel pathway modeled," the EPA said, adding that canola oil would have to meet other criteria as well.

The EPA will receive comments on the data until Aug. 25, after which canola oil could become an eligible fuel source under the fuel mandate, giving it equal status with soyoil, said Tom Hance of lobbying firm Gordley Associates, which represents a coalition of U.S. canola and biodiesel groups.

"If you're a (fuel provider) and you've got to meet this mandate and you've got a choice between fuel that's eligible and fuel that's not, you're going to buy the fuel that's eligible," Hance said.

The main market for canola oil is edible oil, but biodiesel would give it fall-back demand, said Dale Thorenson, assistant director of the U.S. Canola Association.

U.S. farmers planted 1.5 million acres (607,100 hectares) of canola this year, mainly in North Dakota. That's a relatively small area, but the U.S. Canola Association has set a goal of expanding to 4 million acres by 2015.

U.S. plants have annual capacity for 200 million gallons (909 million litres) of biodiesel from canola oil, Hance said.

Canola oil's eligibility for the mandate may also stabilize U.S. imports of Canadian canola oil, Thorenson said. Canada, the world's third largest producer of canola and rapeseed, shipped 892,000 tonnes of canola oil to its top export market the United States from August 2009 through May 2010, according to Statistics Canada.

The United States Congress has set a goal of blending 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel into transportation fuel by 2022. (Reporting by Rod Nickel; additional reporting by Ayesha Rascoe in Washington; Editing by Marguerita Choy)

© Thomson Reuters 2010 All rights reserved



 
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