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What do you think needs to be added or redone on http://www.make-biodiesel.org/ ?

The goal is to make the content so good that it consistently beats JTF on the searches. Being so close to the project, it's easy to overlook the obvious.
 
Location: Cowboy Country | Registered: December 06, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Calling tests "Dr Pepper" is silly, confusing, and unprofessional. Loose the "Dr Pepper" labels and describe what the test really is.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Calling tests "Dr Pepper" is silly, confusing, and unprofessional.
Do you mean like calling a Biodiesel Reactor an "Appleseed" Reactor Wink
 
Registered: April 03, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by riccardo:
quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Calling tests "Dr Pepper" is silly, confusing, and unprofessional.
Do you mean like calling a Biodiesel Reactor an "Appleseed" Reactor

Yes, that would be another example of silly, confusing, and unprofessional labels.
I agree, the "Appleseed label" shouldn't be used either.

We shouldn't be using the techniques for promoting kids toys. Biodiesel isn't for dummies.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
I agree, the "Appleseed label" shouldn't be used either.
You seem to have misunderstood my question. I did not advocate removing the term "appleseed" from Biodiesel Homebrewing language. I only used it as another example of a common term used in biodiesel home-brewing that does not exactly describe what it is.
 
Registered: April 03, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You are correct, using misleading labels is a mistake which causes more misunderstanding. Cutsie labels attract the sort of people who engage in sloppy, unsafe and careless activities. They're the people who burn their houses and give biodiesel a bad name.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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John and Tilly,

As of now I'll stick with the "cutsie" labels. They give a level of acknowledgment to the origins of the labeled item. I will look at possibly moving the "cutsie" labels out of the menu system for improved clarity.

End Of Discussion on labels. If you have something else to recommend or suggest I'm all ears.
 
Location: Cowboy Country | Registered: December 06, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If there is a definitive test for water content in finished biodiesel it's not clearly presented. The clarity test isn't definitive like the HPT.
Can the HPT be used on biodiesel?
here are some moisture tests which might be applicable:
http://www.burnveg.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=72

I've found the freeze-thaw test to be the best test for determining biodiesel quality. Place a sample of BD in the freezer till it completely solidifies. Let it thaw gradually. Any contaminants like soaps or glycerin will end up as sediment in the bottom of the thawed sample.
As the sample warms through the freezing point of water 0°C, high melt point biodiesel fractions which will cause filter clogging problems in cool climates will be seen as a creamy sediment layer in the bottom of the sample.

I didn't see cold fractionating mentioned. If BD is to be used in cool climates then the BD should be mixed with about 25% winter grade D1 or kerosene and chilled to 0°C [or the coldest temperature anticipated]. Then decant the clear fuel off the top for winter use and save the settled BD for summer use.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you John,

The testing section is weak in general. I'll look into the tests you describe. My understanding is the clarity test may not be definitive, but it is ubiquitous with respect to biodiesel. There are times when it is not good enough. One example is blending. Since biodiesel can hold more water than diesel, it is possible to mix clear biodiesel and clear diesel to get a cloudy (from water) blend.
 
Location: Cowboy Country | Registered: December 06, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The clarity test only indicates water less than 1000 PPM and 500 PPM minimum is considered 'dry' by most standards.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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On the water testing of Bio-diesel, I have found here that the clarity test dont mean crud. I have had batches that was crystal clear and could read the side of a truck going by 200 feet away but then do the weigh-heat-weigh test and find it to contain 5times the ASTM spec of water.

Trc


If you can't dazzel them with brilliance, then baffel them with bullchit.
 
Location: north of houston, south of dallas, east of austin | Registered: August 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Trc59:
. . . could read the side of a truck going by 200 feet away but then do the weigh-heat-weigh test and find it to contain 5times the ASTM spec of water.


How big was the truck?
 
Location: Illinois | Registered: February 21, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Producer

It was a uhual rental bobtail. But the fact remains .. the clarity test is subjective, the w-h-w test is very qualitative. I have told others of this point and thaey have done it with Bio they swore was bone dry and then find out it was way over ASTM spec.

Trc


If you can't dazzel them with brilliance, then baffel them with bullchit.
 
Location: north of houston, south of dallas, east of austin | Registered: August 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The site looks good. All the information in one place.


1985 300CD
 
Location: Pa | Registered: June 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For the "stone age " brewers like me that water wash their bio I don't see anything about drying bio.
 
Location: western new york | Registered: November 19, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rick,

What`s the chance of having info on Eductors included very much like the Venturi info, included on the make-biodiesel.org site ? Roll Eyes
 
Location: Derbyshire UK | Registered: November 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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heatbeater, I'll work on it.

Stumpy, can you expand on that some. There are a couple of articles on eductors already on the site. I also have two projects in the works that would each add one or more articles per project on the subject.
 
Location: Cowboy Country | Registered: December 06, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Trc,

I've read on another site, sorry I don't remember the url, They suggested something like weigh, heat, cool, heat, cool, heat, weigh. The idea was that you could heat it up to a point and it would loose no more water, but if you cooled it down and then reheated, it would loose more weight. They even suggested five to 10 heat and cool cycles with each cycle having a smaller weight reduction until the weight reduction was unmeasurable.

I haven't been able to repeat it. I bring it up to see if anyone has or can repeat it.
 
Location: Cowboy Country | Registered: December 06, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Hey Rick, I used the reduced recipe and it worked great!



Lisa 2006 Ford F250 6.0L Powerstroke with 12 inch lift


 
Location: TX | Registered: August 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Trc59:
. . . the w-h-w test is very qualitative. . . .


I am a great believer in the weigh-heat-weigh (w-h-w) test. The results can be very accurate and repeatable.

I have used it to confirm Karl Fisher water tests when I wasn't sure of the KF reagents.

I have also used it to determine the amount of methanol left in the biodiesel at points where the biodiesel "just fails" and where it "just passes" in a closed cup flash test.
 
Location: Illinois | Registered: February 21, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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