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Interesting

I was just having a conversation tonight with a friend that does the PLC programing and we were discussing a controller for an electric car built out of a plc.

He would like to install it in a firefly to build his own hybrid and we were just going over the obvious needs.

Are there any easy controllers to be had out there?


21 years off the grid and counting

 
Location: Muskoka, Ont, Can | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You mean for the PLC to control the engine and electric motor? It might be worth chatting with one of the perveyors of electric car parts (I got my electric TR7 parts from Rodrick Wilde, at EVParts) to see what they recommend for a hybrid controller.
Cheers,
JohnO

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Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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no,just the electrics. The gas engine would be independent of the electrics. If the power for the electric motor runs out then start the engine and run normally.

The plc would just controle the actions like power to the wheels and swiching over to charge when decelerating,that kind of stuff


21 years off the grid and counting

 
Location: Muskoka, Ont, Can | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Actually, you will want a single processor controlling everything. These cars aren't using PLCs for their control. In this situation you will want a single microprocessor with inputs and outputs. The controls for the system would be much easier to write using a standard programming language such as C, ladder logic is a bit more difficult to use in complex systems.


"What would you do with a brain if you had one?" Dorothy Gale
 
Location: Upstate, NY | Registered: November 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Electric Car Motor Controllers are commonly available with regen braking/recharging options (mine has it). No PLC necessary. It's not clear to me why you'd want a PLC. The controls for engine and motor just aren't very complicated, unless you've got something else in mind.
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This guy knows plc's,we were just kicking around ideas.

What are the price ranges for those controllers,I will pass that on to him


21 years off the grid and counting

 
Location: Muskoka, Ont, Can | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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A top quality 400 amp/120 volt regenerative DC controller will cost about $4000 now-days. For comparison, my old Curtis 300 amp 84 volt controlelr with regen cost about $1500. My 50 hp Kostov motor cost $1200 (I got a great deal). 24 T-105 batteries will cost about $2500. Add a few hunder more for odds and ends and you'll have $8000 in parts sitting there, ready to start converting a vehicle. I made my own transmission adapter, but they can easily cost $1000. A charger can cost another $500-2000.

For a PLC to "control" a high-amp DC motor requires a bunch of high power electronics, otherwise known as a "motor controller". The motor controller otherwise only needs a potentiometer to control it with, so the is overkill, unless it's also doing somethign else.
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Look on eBay. Ebay is your friend just like google


"What would you do with a brain if you had one?" Dorothy Gale
 
Location: Upstate, NY | Registered: November 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Johno,I'll pass that on


21 years off the grid and counting

 
Location: Muskoka, Ont, Can | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
WRONG!!!!! Green Energy actually cost more. Can anyone explain that? This is supposed to be an energy source that is not dependent on oil prices. Given that green energy costs 1 to 2.5 cents more per kwh why would I change? It should cost less, right?


Yes I can explain that check this story on the BBC

quote:

For nearly 50 years the Iranian oil industry was controlled by the British Anglo-Persian Oil company.
You can still see the names of British companies on some of the older plant. But the British only paid $75,000 (£40,000) for the original 60-year concession - and a small share of the profits.


It is always cheaper to steal.
 
Location: Nimbin Australia | Registered: December 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Dan a simple way to prototype a controller is a picaxe chip. These are Pic chips with an operating system on board so you can program them simply and write code in basic. It has inbuilt functions like PWM ADC etc. They make micro controllers easy. I have used them for stepper controllers and temp controlled relays etc. PLC's are great at what they do, but micro controllers are more flexible.

There are quite a few CNC and robotic sites out there, some of their stuff might be useful.
I think the biggest cost will be for devices that actually switch the motors. The amps involved usually means large(expensive) semiconductors. You might be able to get big relays from junked equipment.
 
Location: Nimbin Australia | Registered: December 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Sinbad,I'll keep that in mind.

I don't see me building anything soon since I have enough projects to keep me busy.

My laptop took a lightning strike to the modem last friday so I'm out for a while till I figure out what I'm going to do.

In the mean time I'll just use the puter at work Smile


21 years off the grid and counting

 
Location: Muskoka, Ont, Can | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Originally posted by 12voltdan:
The costs of converting to solar can be recouped in ten years at todays prices for electricity.

I've never lived in the same place for longer than 5 years. It makes it kind of hard to reach the break even point...

-Jim


www dot FryerPower dot com
1987 300DT (The sedan, not the wagon.) Some modifications to the fuel system.
1995 S350D Unmodified fuel system.
I plead the 5th.
 
Location: Middle Tennessee, Jack Daniel's country | Registered: August 10, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yup,that makes it tougher to do....

Maybe keep your panels on a pole mount then move them with you,you only leave the base behind.

Still a pain to do though.


21 years off the grid and counting

 
Location: Muskoka, Ont, Can | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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