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Anthropogenic Global Warming- Your thoughts please
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Hi Mike,

quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Do you realize there are no penguins at the North Pole?
Do you relize there is no open ocean at the South Pole?
If that photo was taken at one of the Poles, it would have been the North pole.
Of course there is nothing that says where the picture was taken.
The author of the Tweet has easily tricked you into thinking something that was not said.


Oh look Here is a penguin at the North Pole!







 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Teach ‘em Green, Raise ‘em Stupid

According to the latest international comparison, Australian kids are falling further behind, despite ever-larger sums of taxpayer cash being poured into the Chalk-Industrial Complex. One reason we're raising another generation of dolts: propaganda passed off as wisdom

http://quadrant.org.au/opinion...een-raise-em-stupid/



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Mike,

Being mindful that you have taken The Donald as your Life experience and climate change Guru, I am just curious what you think of his latest "Victory" with Carrier Air Conditioning.

As you recall, Trump originally threatened Carrier with a 35% tariff on any air Conditioners produced in Mexico and imported into the USA for sale.
Now, after long and arduous negotiations while wielding a "big Stick" Trump and Pence have "forced" Carrier to take a $7,000,000.00 Taxpayer handout and other unspecified benefits to not ship about 800 jobs to Mexico- at least for the moment. Wink, wink, nudge, nudge. Wink

The line forms on the left for companies threatening to move US jobs to Mexico unless they receive a huge taxpayer handout







 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The scientific method is the foundation of real science. It's based on skepticism. Any theory must be tested with empirical evidence and the theory adjusted or rejected if it doesn't fit the data gathered from the real world.

Consensus is the foundation of pseudo 'science'. Examples such as political 'science' and the social 'sciences' like eugenics are based on popularity, ie. if enough people believe in something then it must be 'true'. Any popular theory must be supported with carefully selected empirical evidence which has been edited or adjusted to fit a collective opinion. That's not real science.

The current GlobalWarmingClimateChange fad is strikingly similar to eugenics, the racist pseudoscience determined to wipe away all human beings deemed "unfit," by preserving only those who conformed to a white European stereotype. The elitist intellectuals of the day embraced eugenics with the same fervor they embrace GlobalWarmingClimateChange today.

The following will be useful for students and practitioners of real science.

Global Warming Debunked

Warning to alarmist Climate Trolls, don't watch this, it will challenge your preconceived notions and only confuse you. Go back to the little table and play among yourselves, the adults are listening to a Professor of Physics at Princeton University.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Mike,

Being mindful that you have taken The Donald as your Life experience and climate change Guru, I am just curious what you think of his latest "Victory" with Carrier Air Conditioning.

As you recall, Trump originally threatened Carrier with a 35% tariff on any air Conditioners produced in Mexico and imported into the USA for sale.
Now, after long and arduous negotiations while wielding a "big Stick" Trump and Pence have "forced" Carrier to take a $7,000,000.00 Taxpayer handout and other unspecified benefits to not ship about 800 jobs to Mexico- at least for the moment. Wink, wink, nudge, nudge. Wink

The line forms on the left for companies threatening to move US jobs to Mexico unless they receive a huge taxpayer handout







 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Trump Warns That Companies Shipping Jobs Overseas Will Be Slapped with Enormous Bribes
By Andy Borowitz , December 2, 2016

NEW YORK (The Borowitz Report)—President-elect Donald J. Trump drew a line in the sand on Friday as he warned that U.S. companies planning to ship jobs overseas will be slapped with enormous bribes.

“If you think you’re going to get away with sending jobs out of the U.S., think again,” Trump said. “You are about to be bribed, big league.”

He raised the cautionary example of Carrier Corporation, which this week decided to keep a few hundred jobs in the U.S. in exchange for a seven-million-dollar government incentive.
“I warned those boys at Carrier: we can do this the easy way, or the hard way, where you get seven million dollars,” he said. “They backed down so fast—it was terrific.”

The President-elect said that the Carrier story should strike fear into the hearts of all American businesses that might be contemplating shipping jobs overseas. “Do you really want to wind up like Carrier, with seven million dollars in your pockets?” he asked. “I don’t think so.”

In a parting shot, Trump warned companies that he was prepared to back up his tough rhetoric with even tougher action. “I will bribe you so hard, your grandchildren will get paid,” he threatened.







 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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November brings record-breaking temperatures from Nunavut to Siberia
Nov. 30 saw spring-like warmth across much of Nunavut
December 01, 2016 - 4:00 pm

In many Nunavut communities, chances are you traded your parka for a jacket during the month of November.

During November, monthly average temperatures in Nunavut’s central Kivalliq region ranged from 4.1 C higher in Naujaat to 8.2 C higher in Arviat—and sparrows, usually long-gone from Rankin Inlet, were still around.

And, in Arviat, the puddles reminded residents of spring, not of the usually cold, dark month leading into winter.

On Nov. 30, it was just a little below freezing in Arviat—minus 1.5 C.
That high temperature beat the previous record high for that day of minus 4.6 C set in 1986.
The day’s low of minus 2.6 C was also much higher than the record low of minus 33 C set in 1991.

On Nov. 30, the western Nunavut Kitikmeot community of Gjoa Haven, where the temperatures averaged 6.5 C higher in November, you could also say it was really warm: The minus 3.4 C temperature on Nov. 30 beat the record of minus 9.5 C set in 1987, and Gjoa Haven’s daily low of minus 9.3 C was much higher than 1991’s record-breaking low of minus 37.5 C for Nov. 30.








 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Australia is on the brink of an electricity disaster thanks to its global warming madness.

In South Australia, the wind farms failed again and helped to cause huge blackouts.

...

But two things about Thursday’s blackout should terrify South Australians.

First, they ran out of power just when demand could not have been lower — at around 1am on a mild day.

Imagine what will happen in summer, during a scorcher when workers have just returned home and switched on their TVs and aircons.

Second, South Australia is still relying on Victoria to bail it out with its own coal-fired electricity.

But that can’t last, now that the owners of Victoria’s giant Hazelwood plant, responsible for up to 20 per cent of the state’s electricity, say it must close.

Blame global warming hysteria for that, too.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/ne...327e47eed-1480935238



 
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Whitehorse saw warmest November in 40 years
CBC News Posted: Dec 02, 2016

No, you weren't imagining it — this past November was an unusually mild one in Whitehorse. Environment Canada says it was the warmest one in four decades.

"It's been quite a while," said meteorologist Matt Macdonald. "Definitely an exceptional experience."

Unusual weather keeps Dawson City waiting for river to freeze

Mild weather brings shaky start to Yukon's winter tourism season

November in Northwest Territories the 4th warmest on record

The average temperature last month in Whitehorse was a full five degrees warmer than normal.

Macdonald says early November was particularly mild this year in Yukon, owing to a "strong southerly flow" that brought warmer temperatures to much of northwestern Canada. He says Yukon saw several record-breaking daytime temperatures.






 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ah little Mikey,
you do make me smile some times Wink

quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
Australia is on the brink of an electricity disaster thanks to its global warming madness.
In South Australia, the wind farms failed again and helped to cause huge blackouts.
Second, South Australia is still relying on Victoria to bail it out with its own coal-fired electricity.

But that can’t last, now that the owners of Victoria’s giant Hazelwood plant, say it must close.
Blame global warming hysteria for that, too.
One minute you rail against coal fired power plants telling us how polluting they are and the next minute you are bemoaning the impending closure of the Brown-coal fired Hazlewood power plant that was listed as the least carbon efficient power station in the OECD in a 2005 report by WWF Australia, widely recognised as the most polluting power plant in the world.

Hazlewood currently supplies 5% of Australian electricity and 3% of Australia's total greenhouse gas emissions.

On 3 November 2016 Engie announced that Hazelwood would be closed as of the end of March 2017, citing the company's transformational policy of investing solely in low-carbon and renewable
energy, as well lower energy prices and oversupply within Victoria



Farewell Hazelwood, the dirtiest power plant in the world






 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Dr Jerry Pournelle on Global Warming:

One of the problems is disagreement on just what facts we have. I have been required to measure temperatures to a tenth of a degree (both C and F) and I found it very difficult and expensive; yet we discuss tenths of a degree differences in average year-round global temperature, and most of those discussing that seem to have no notion of the difficulty of obtaining that data. I give you one example: what is the average temperature of your back yard over a 24 hour period? Surely easier to measure than the average temperature of the entire Earth for a year, no? But if you attempt to discover it, you will find it no easy task. Take a copper globe, four inches in diameter, and put a good thermocouple inside it. Solder the thermocouple to a dime sized disk of thin copper, and let that hang free in the center of the globe. (While you are at it, put another thermocouple soldered to a small copper disk inside a beaker of ice water, preferably all water including the ice having been distilled. This will serve as the reference temperature and presumed to be 0 degrees C.) Hang the globe out where it will be exposed to the sky day and night.

You will notice that your temperatures will vary considerably from day to day, and even hour to hour. You are getting a combination of conductive air temperature and the radiation environment temperature, and while air temperature varies more slowly, the radiant temperature varies a lot, and quite quickly, depending on cloud cover. When there are clouds in daytime the temperature will be lower than when it is exposed to the sun. At night it’s even more variant; the radiant temperature of clear night sky is some -270 degrees; the Romans used to make ice cream in the desert by taking advantage of this. The radiant temperature of cloudy environment will be much higher. OK, put you thermometer in the shade; but have you really got the temperature now? Just what is the temperature of your back yard averaged over a 24 hour period? Your answer will depend on how you measure it. Now look at the source temperatures fed into the climate models.

I could list some more problems; but my point is that the “consensus” of the scientists includes people who never think about measurements and how they are obtained. The models are not sensitive to cloud cover. And if we try to compare temperatures from long ago to today’s, none of those from long ago – even fifty years ago – were accurate to a tenth of a degree. In the 12800’s and for much of the 20th Century, sea temperatures were taken by drawing up a bucket of water and measuring it with a hand-held mercury thermometer. At night, by a seaman who didn’t have a magnifying glass.

Part of the consensus comes from the agreement of many models; they nearly all use the same inputs, and they give the same predictions. They all attempt to account for all known energy sources, but of course those aren’t all predictable. The year 1816 is known as “The Year without a Summer” (also known as 1800 and froze to death). This is because the volcano Tambura blew off and polluted the Earth’s atmosphere, reflecting sunlight that normally would have reached Earth; the result was year round winter. The models could not have predicted that, nor could they predict most other volcanic eruptions. As an aside, Benjamin Franklin, observing an Icelandic volcano pouring gup into the sky that reached England and beyond, proposed the theory that something like this caused the Ice Ages.

No one sane denies that raising the CO2 levels without limit would have great and very likely deleterious effects on Earth’s climate. If those levels get a good bit higher, something ought to be done. We were told the Iraq war would cost $300 Billion. I said at the time that for that much I could build 100 1000 megawatt nuclear power plants (the first ones would cost maybe $15 billion, but by the time we had 20 or so they would be more like 1 or 2 billion each, leaving plenty of money to mine Uranium); with that power we could tell the Arabs to drink their oil, and build plants to take whatever amount of Carbon we liked out of the atmosphere. Of course that wasn’t done, the war cost far more than $300 billion, but that’s for another discussion.

We know that in historical times the Earth has been warmer than it is now. In Viking times. Leif the Lucky and his cohorts built dairy farms in Greenland that are still covered by ice; and the Vikings planted a colony on Nova Scotia which they called Vinland because they could grow grapes and make wine there. Needless to say it’s still to cold to grow grapes in Vinland. In those Viking times we find middle European monastery records of longer growing seasons, and we find similar records of agricultural yields in China. It was warmer in Viking times. We have pretty good evidence of a Roman Warm period, and of climate variations during the Bronze age. It is unlikely that human CO2 contributions caused those. I don’t know what did, but it seems clear that in historical times we have been warmer.

Clearly it has been colder. In 1776 cannon were brought across the frozen Hudson River to the relief of General George Washington in Harlem Heights, thus saving the Continental Army and the Revolution. The Hudson hasn’t frozen hard enough to walk on, much less drag cannon across it, for a century.

It has been warmer and colder in historic times. The models say there is a sudden great rise in temperature now, but the data don’t show it.

And in a way it’s all irrelevant anyway: give me enough electric power and I’ll take the Carbon out of the atmosphere if we have to do that, and if we don’t have to and it’s getting colder again, I’ll have power to heat homes. Our Climate Problem is an economic and energy problem, and that’s true whether we are in for warming or cooling.

--Dr Jerry Pournelle
https://www.jerrypournelle.com/chaosmanor/view/



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Mike,

quote:
Originally posted by john galt:
But that can’t last, now that the owners of Victoria’s giant Hazelwood plant, say it must close.
Blame global warming hysteria for that, too.


Now that it is clear that you are a firm supporter of coal fired powered plants, and in particular "Hazlewood, the dirtiest power plant in the world", it is only fitting that we start "The Mike Peltier save Hazlewood power plant, the dirtiest power plant in the world and every other coal fired power plant movement"



"The Mike Peltier save Hazlewood power plant, the dirtiest power plant in the world and every other coal fired power plant group"






 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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According to the most highly-cited estimate of recent (1992 – 2011) polar ice sheet melt rates, the land ice on Greenland and Antarctica has been contributing to sea level rise at a rate of 0.59 mm/year in the modern era, which means the equivalent of 5.9 centimeters (2.3 inches) per century of sea level rise might eventually accrue if the polar ice sheets continue melting at current rates for the next 10 decades.
quote:

Shepherd et al., 2012

Since 1992 [through 2011], the polar ice sheets [Antarctica and Greenland] have contributed, on average, 0.59 ± 0.20 millimeter year−1 to the rate of global sea-level rise.


Of course, a sea level rise rate contribution from Greenland and Antarctica that amounts to a little more than 2 inches per century is not particularly alarming. And when observed sea level rise contribution rates from melting ice sheets don’t elicit the headlining attention they deserve, it’s time to promulgate climate modeling catastrophes that might occur at some point in the distant future.
http://notrickszone.com/2016/1...2100-sheer-nonsense/



 
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US Hazards Outlook
NWS Climate Prediction Center College Park MD
300 PM EST December 05 2016

A strong area of upper-level high pressure is expected to remain anchored over the Bering Sea during the next two weeks with arctic high pressure persisting across much of mainland Alaska and the Alaska Panhandle.

Hazards

Much below-normal temperatures for parts of the western and central U.S., Thu, Dec 8.
Much below-normal temperatures shifting from the central to southeastern U.S., Fri-Sat, Dec 9-10.
Heavy, lake-effect snow downwind of the Great Lakes, Thu-Fri, Dec 8-9.
Freezing rain for parts of the Pacific Northwest, Thu, Dec 8.
Heavy precipitation (rain and high-elevation snow) for parts of the Pacific Northwest and northern California, Thu-Mon, Dec 8-12.
High winds for the Pacific Northwest, Thu, Dec 8.
Heavy precipitation (rain and high-elevation snow) for the northern Sierra mountains, Thu-Fri, Dec 8-9.
Heavy snow for parts of the northern Rockies, Thu-Sat, Dec 8-10.
Much below-normal temperatures across portions of the Alaska Panhandle and mainland Alaska, Thu-Mon, Dec 8-12.
High winds for the northern Alaska Panhandle, Thu-Fri, Dec 8-9.
A slight risk of Much below-normal temperatures for much of the central and eastern U.S. and parts of the Pacific Northwest and northern Rockies, Tue-Mon, Dec 13-19.
A moderate risk of Much below-normal temperatures for parts of the northern and central Great Plains, upper Mississippi Valley, Great Lakes, northern Rockies, and northern intermountain West, Tue-Sat, Dec 13-17.
A high risk of Much below-normal temperatures for parts of the northern Great Plains and northern Rockies, Tue-Thu, Dec 13-15.
A slight risk of much Much below-normal temperaturess for parts of eastern mainland Alaska and the Alaska Panhandle, Tue-Mon, Dec 13-19.
A moderate risk of Much below-normal temperatures for the Alaska Panhandle, Tue-Sat, Dec 13-17.
Severe drought across parts of the eastern U.S., Great Plains, Missouri River Valley, Central Rockies, Intermountain West, California and Hawaii.

http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/p.../threats/threats.php



Record cold coming to ‘almost entire USA’ – Low temperature records set to be SHATTERED



It's heading to -30°C overnight in coldest NorthAmerica and expected to persist for most of the month.



 
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An Unusually Warm Arctic Year: Sign of Future Climate Turmoil?
by fen montaigne

This year will almost certainly go down as the warmest on record in the Arctic, with autumn temperatures soaring 36 degrees F above normal.
In a Yale e360 interview, climatologist Jennifer Francis explains why a swiftly warming Arctic may have profound effects on global weather.

Atmospheric scientist Jennifer Francis has for five years propounded a widely discussed theory about the rapidly warming Arctic and global weather:
Rising temperatures in the Arctic, closely intertwined with the loss of sea ice, are changing the shape of the jet stream and altering the weather of the Northern Hemisphere.

Some climate scientists and meteorologists have embraced her theory, while others have adopted a wait-and-see attitude.

But this year’s freakishly warm Arctic weather is lending credence to her hypothesis that a lessening of the temperature difference between the Arctic and the mid-latitudes is causing the jet stream to wobble, allowing warm air to flood into the north polar regions and sending frigid air southward into parts of Asia. More profound changes are in store as the Arctic continues to warm, says Francis, a research professor at Rutgers

In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Francis discusses the perilous state of Arctic sea ice, explains why large portions of the Arctic have experienced temperatures more typical of New York City, and warns that we ignore the climate upheaval in the Arctic at our own peril. “The speed of the change is what is very disturbing to me,” says Francis, “because it's such an indicator of what's happening to the planet as a whole.”

Be The first person on your block to Join Mike Peltier's " Save the Haselwood brown coal fired electricity generating powerplant, the dirtiest power plant in the World" Group







 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Mike,

You are so obviously correct.

The two charts below clearly shows the global cooling that you continually tell us is occurring.





Be The first person on your block to Join Mike Peltier's " Save the Haselwood brown-coal fired electricity generating powerplant, the dirtiest power plant in the World" Group







 
Location: ลึก ประเทศอินเดีย | Registered: March 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Canadian oilsands reality check:

quote:
Here's a quote from a resident of ft Mac before the oil boom.

"I lived in Fort McMurray from 1963-1965, before big oil moved in. There was 1200 people living in the Waterways/Fort McMurray area. I can tell you at that time oil was seeping into the Athabasca river and we were told not to eat the fish from it, the Clearwater was ok.

You could tell where the oil sands were located as the trees were stunted, twisted and deformed, and there were tar pits that would trap animals. My sister and I laugh at the environmentalists when they say the oil companies are destroying the region, when in fact the oil companies are cleaning up natures oil spill and returning it to a pristine forest and lakes.

Though I would say that none of these environmentalists were born before the oil companies started to clean it up or even their parents likely never even heard of the oil sands region. When I lived in Fort Mac the only way you could get there was by air or train, there was no highway.

So instead of attacking the oil industry we should applaud them for cleaning up an oil spill from a million years ago... That's the trouble with these so called green people, they only hear and shout out the propaganda they have been paid for, and know nothing of the past history... Can't believe there is such a following of the chicken little's."

These companies were also a huge part in the rescue and housing of fleeing victims of the Fort Mac fires.



 
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