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Water pollution
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Water is essential for the survival of all known forms of life. The human body is anywhere from 55% to 78% water depending on body size. To function properly, the body requires between one and seven liters of water per day to avoid dehydration
All known forms of life depend on water. Because of overpopulation, mass consumption, misuse, and water pollution, the availability of drinking water per capita is inadequate and shrinking as of the year 2006.

40% of America's rivers are too polluted for fishing, swimming, or aquatic life.
Even worse are America's lakes—46% are too polluted for fishing, swimming, or aquatic life.
1.2 trillion gallons of untreated sewage, stormwater, and industrial waste are discharged into US waters annually. The US EPA has warned that sewage levels in rivers could be back to the super-polluted levels of the 1970s by the year 2016.
Asian rivers are the most polluted in the world. They have three times as many bacteria from human waste as the global average and 20 times more lead than rivers in industrialized countries

Serious water pollution incidents increased by 50% in England and Wales last year with farmers responsible for more than a quarter of them, the Environment Agency says.

I made this Thread to increase knowledge about water pollution such as industrial water pollution and to share thoughts about how to prevent it.
 
Registered: January 29, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I work in heavy industry and design specialty cleaning chemicals. If we all obey the rules, clean water won't be a problem. I have to design my cleaning chemicals to be acceptable to my customers' sewer department. They in turn have to make sure they clean up the water according to federal guidelines. We work together to design a safe solution. In many cases, the water discharged by the plants is much cleaner than the water in the streams. That's how it should work. That is... if everybody does it according to the rules.

My chemicals are all designed to be readily biodegradable or reclaimed for BTU recovery. But, they still need to be disposed of in a water treatment plant. That's the right way.

Meanwhile, individuals dump anything and everything on the ground. And it adds up. Working up in Minnesota years ago I was on the 6th floor of a hotel situated on the banks of the Mississippi. I was looking across the river to a neighborhood where a guy was washing his car. The soap suds were running down his driveway to the gutter and on to a storm drain which drained directly into the river. Add that a gazillion times as the Mississippi heads toward New Orleans (where I started school) and you can see the problem.

It's good that we can buy biodegradable cleaners. But, I once heard an EPA official say "A dead horse is biodegradable but I don't want one in my backyard!" Chicken litter is biodegradable, but too much of a good thing can do damage as well. It's all about finding balance.

The good news is I work with some guys (much smarter than me) who have a real knack at turning waste into something positive. That chicken litter can be converted into energy and a mild fertilizer. With the right bugs, hazardous waste can be converted to plant food.

I got into heavy industry in '81. When the OSHA and EPA rules got more and more strict in the mid-'80s I remember making a personal commitment to learn how to work within the rules rather than hide from them. I've had a personal goal of redesigning my old chemicals and engineering my new ones to be readily biodegradable and made from renewable/sustainable ingredients.

It's easy to talk about the environment. It's better to have a hand in doing something about it. And all of us can. We're already doing it by being involved in renewable fuels (biodiesel/WVO). We can do more by learning about the chemicals we use. I wouldn't even think of using most of the ingredients found in the chemicals in the paint department or automotive department at Wal-mart. Meanwhile, I find the ingredients to my chemicals in the pharmaceutical/cosmetic aisle as well as in the grocery department.

By the way, I'm working on a "renewable methanol". All methanol on the market today is made from natural gas. We're working on methanol and other products from sustainable feedstock. In many ways, we're eliminating pollution AND reducing the use of fossil fuels at the same time. How cool is that?


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I run my company entirely on renewable energy including electricity from generators running on biofuels.

 
Location: El Dorado, Ark | Registered: July 04, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Do you have a link to the original study.
Or to the raw data and data analysis methods?

I don't know of a single river in Oregon that I would be afraid to swim in. Although, I must say that the Metolius River is mighty cold!!!!!!

I think the same would be true for the lakes too.

And, I could go for some good river trout too Wink

We do have a risk of Giardia in the Northwest, a bug that does affect humans, but is also transmitted via game animals. So, I would probably filter the water before drinking it.

It is often hard to distinguish the effects of natural sediments from man-made pollutants... at least when looking at the river from a distance. All the stories I've read indicate that the Platte river was pretty brown colored a century and a half ago when this country was settled. It probably does have some additional crop runoff.. and likely fertilizer fed algae.

In fact, one of New Orleans biggest problems is that the city has been walled off from the vital nutrient sediments carried by the Mississippi.

That said, we do need to worry about what we send downstream. And, storm sewer runoff should be processed to some extent. Phosphates (many soaps), of course, get gobbled up by algae... not pretty, but not the end of the world either.
 
Location: Oregon | Registered: October 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Todd T:
I work in heavy industry and design specialty cleaning chemicals. If we all obey the rules, clean water won't be a problem. I have to design my cleaning chemicals to be acceptable to my customers' sewer department. They in turn have to make sure they clean up the water according to federal guidelines. We work together to design a safe solution. In many cases, the water discharged by the plants is much cleaner than the water in the streams. That's how it should work. That is... if everybody does it according to the rules.

My chemicals are all designed to be readily biodegradable or reclaimed for BTU recovery. But, they still need to be disposed of in a water treatment plant. That's the right way.

Meanwhile, individuals dump anything and everything on the ground. And it adds up. Working up in Minnesota years ago I was on the 6th floor of a hotel situated on the banks of the Mississippi. I was looking across the river to a neighborhood where a guy was washing his car. The soap suds were running down his driveway to the gutter and on to a storm drain which drained directly into the river. Add that a gazillion times as the Mississippi heads toward New Orleans (where I started school) and you can see the problem.

It's good that we can buy biodegradable cleaners. But, I once heard an EPA official say "A dead horse is biodegradable but I don't want one in my backyard!" Chicken litter is biodegradable, but too much of a good thing can do damage as well. It's all about finding balance.

The good news is I work with some guys (much smarter than me) who have a real knack at turning waste into something positive. That chicken litter can be converted into energy and a mild fertilizer. With the right bugs, hazardous waste can be converted to plant food.

I got into heavy industry in '81. When the OSHA and EPA rules got more and more strict in the mid-'80s I remember making a personal commitment to learn how to work within the rules rather than hide from them. I've had a personal goal of redesigning my old chemicals and engineering my new ones to be readily biodegradable and made from renewable/sustainable ingredients.

It's easy to talk about the environment. It's better to have a hand in doing something about it. And all of us can. We're already doing it by being involved in renewable fuels (biodiesel/WVO). We can do more by learning about the chemicals we use. I wouldn't even think of using most of the ingredients found in the chemicals in the paint department or automotive department at Wal-mart. Meanwhile, I find the ingredients to my chemicals in the pharmaceutical/cosmetic aisle as well as in the grocery department.

By the way, I'm working on a "renewable methanol". All methanol on the market today is made from natural gas. We're working on methanol and other products from sustainable feedstock. In many ways, we're eliminating pollution AND reducing the use of fossil fuels at the same time. How cool is that?


Good to know that there are peoples who cares about the environment. I think if every Industry follow these steps then there will be no problem of water pollution. I think water treatment consultant must be contacted by these industries
Here are some more interesting facts

Guide to water pollution
Industrial Water Treatment Consulting & Engineering Services - NJ, PA, NY, DE, CT & MD - JNBLabs.com
Pollution, Water Pollution, Air Pollution - Green Student U
 
Registered: January 29, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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