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The GM 5.7 Olds 350 Diesel Thread
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Thanks McD again I appreciate you for sharing your wealth of knowledge. I have order the the parts (though the part number did not match but) doing some research I found out that these car came with two option of EGR valve one for CANADA and other USA. I have order the part (made for USA) with the hope ~~~~~when it arrives it just walks in under the air cleaner Smile will keep you posted.
 
Registered: June 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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McD/and all the god folks out there- I have created another problem due to lack of experience with diesel engines. I have purred the SEA FOAM into the gas tank to clean up the ol stale diesel as it was recommended by millions of people. Still don't know if it was good or bad idea.......as of now it seems bad. Here is whats happening to the car ...it starts since I have cleaned the EGR valve but smokes like hell....sound very crackly.... pounding has diminished quite a bit. took it for a short drive at first it did not want to go over 15/mh later I was able to make the 35/mh max speed!!!! Engine shakes a lot when Idling and gases leaks out from the manifold..there is amber "WAIT" light constantly on in the dashboard which was usually gone after the trip of glow plugs...........clouds of white smokes and no power........inside of tailpipe has raw black sud ......do you think it is only an OXYGEN SENSOR??? of do I have a bigger problem??? oh did I tell you it still leaks oils by the buckets Smile

Thanks for the help
 
Registered: June 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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CCD:

No O2 sensor or for that matter, any electronic stuff other then maybe for the tranny and very unlikely the EGR on your engine. Rudimentary stuff was used for the California versions. Your problem seems to be the glowplug relay and controller. If the glows stay on, its the glowplugs that are lighting up your fuel, not compression, thus the rough running and the lack of power. Lets hope you haven't swollen the plugs. They are only supposed to be on for a max of 15 seconds.

The controllers were a problem with these engines and they are expensive even if you can locate one. A cheaper and more reliable fix is to disconnect the controller altogether and run the relay activation from a momentary on switch mounted on your dash. Glow for 10 seconds and your off.

If they glowplugs are swollen, your back into a head job. If you break one off trying to pull them out, there is no orifice large enough to allow you to get a magnet into the prechamber to get the broken off bit out of the engine. You will have to pull the head and pop out the pre-chamber to get the bit out. Don't even think about running it with bits of glowplug floating around in the pre-chamber. They will eventually find themselves into the upper cylinder and will punch a hole in your piston.

Try very carefully to remove the glow plugs. If after running out of thread, try to remove using very light pressure. If you encounter any serious restriction...stop. Do all the plugs this way and leave the stuck ones in the head, unscrewed and, after removing the fuel stop wire (the one on the pump closest to the front of the engine) turn the engine over a few times. Often the pressure will pop the glowplugs out without breaking them. If this doesn't work then, and only then, try to use some real force to pull them out. If it comes out in one piece then you have lucked out. If not then it's head job time.

Hope this helps

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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McD- Thank for the advice I will try the manual switch. Today once again I took the 3 mile journey with my son. on the way back home we really had hard time moving this thing we got stuck couple of time at stop lights...regardless of how much we depressed the gas pedal we could not move more than 35 mile on downhill and 25 on slight uphill. Then here comes the driveway and we got stuck...this thing just did not want to climb slightest slope!!! we had to push and finally pull it to off the road. no power!!!! do still think the manual switch remedy will work even if the light goes off most of the time.....do you think bottle of that SEA FOAM in the trunk really makes that much smoke ?? Is that stuff BAD?? should I leave it in or empty it out.

Before the gasket I did put all new glow plugs, controller switch (expensive) and relay ...I am guessing my so called mechanic messed the Injector pump .....is there certain adjustment when you put back the pump I remember he was having hard time and finally he shoved it in and called the day??

Thanks for your responses.

Regards
~cCd~
 
Registered: June 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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CCD:

Before you drive it again, get rid of the old fuel/Sea Foam. Something is really wonky here. If the pump was way off, it won't start, let alone run for any amount of time. The symptoms are indicative of a bad pump or a bad filter. This is the way they go south.

Before condemming the pump tho, get some fresh diesel in the tank and a double dose of Stanadyne additive (use only Stanadyne this time around)available through your local injection pump guy or some automotive supply houses. You can check truck stops as well. Don't let anyone try to sell you anything else. There is something in the Stanadyne stuff that works miracles on these pumps.

You will probably have to syphon out the tank, or if you have the electric lift pump then just open up the water drain on the filter and apply power to the lift pump (it goes without saying that you should attach a hose to the overflow and put the other end in a bucket Big Grin). Also replace the fuel filter. These symptoms are also indicative of a bad filter. Many years ago I changed out a perfectly good pump and injectors, only to find it was a bad filter all along.

With the new fuel, and the glowplugs re-wired, it may take a few miles to clear up if indeed it ever will. These pumps don't just stop working, they just gradually loose power till they run as you are describing.

Don't give up on this just yet. Your almost there.

Good luck

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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McD- I took it to a different mechanic and he says I need to put a new rebuilt motor in it is it worth spending another over 1k again on it ( he claims the motor only has 20k miles) how can I tell is there a way to find out if that is the case??.....I'm about to lose my patience and all the money I had...........or if I am going to spend money would you recommend a better engine for this car instead of 5.7 that every one else tells me is a crap engine built by GM!!!need some serious advice. Thanks
 
Registered: June 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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CCD:

I think what you are looking for is a reality check. First of all you must determine what your going to use the car for and what you are willing to pay for that useage. First you must consider the car itself.

Currently you have two major problems that are not engine related.

1. Next year the car is going to be 30 years old. Parts are now, and will continue to be harder and harder to find and if you are going to use this as your daily driver this will become a big issue.

2. The car sat for 12 years. Even if it was stored inside out of the elements, it is, at the end of the day, just a piece of machinery and all machinery deteriorates if not used. Seals dry out and crack, cables sieze up, bearings fuse etc. Even if you can get it going you will spend the next 18 months chasing hundreds of little things that would not normally fail if excercised regularly. Electrics are particularly prone to problems due to dissimilar metal corrosion.

If the car is in excellent shape overall it may have some intrinsic value as a collector car, seeing as it is the diesel. Very few of them survived intact. To preserve this value, I would consider a full body off restoration to like new condition and only drive it on the weekends, assuming you have the resources. As a gasser, its just another old chevy. As it stands now, it is merely a novelty.

Believe it or not, the engine is the least of your worries. If indeed the engine only has 20K on it, then if you have any talent with a wrench, the bottom end should only need a ring and bearing job. There should be no noticeble wear on the cylinder walls. Don't be suprised to still see the cross hatching on the walls. This engine hadn't even been broken in before it was stored. Cost of parts including a gasket set and oil pump will be less then 500 bucks.

The heads are another thing altogether. It is unlikely they have survived unscathed and they should be checked very carefully before spending any coin on them. I do believe there are a few vendors still stocking these heads (probably Chinese knock-offs...Clearwater heads in Florida has had good luck with them) and the last time I checked they were under 300 bucks each. To do it right, you should also consider the ARP stud kit and the Felpro solid copper gasket set, again about 300 bucks.

The fuel pump should be around 300 bucks to rebuild and the injectors will run you around 30 bucks a piece to rebuild. Misc. water pumps, alternators hoses etc. another 200 and, given the age, you will also need a new rad ($400.00???). The tranny should be freshened up and all the driveline, brakes and suspension should be given a good once over.

Sorry to be an advanced agent for a famine but if I was in your shoes, I would get it running as well as possible and flog it out for whatever you can get. The wagon wheel and coffee can crowd love these cars Big Grin.

As far as an alternative, Both Chevy and Buick made exceptional full size cars from 91 to 96 and the wagons are still plentiful. Good examples can be had from the south for under $1,400.00 that normally require little or no work to get them road worthy. They are known as "B" body cars and make excellent candidates for a 6.2/6.5 liter diesel conversion. Using known good used parts, you can do the conversion yourself for around 4 grand. The 91 in my sig I converted in 2002 and was used as my daily up till a year ago. Put almost 120,000 miles on it with absolutely no serious problems and it consistantly got me 36-38 MPG (IMP), alot of that mileage on bio. Needs a pump and injectors, some exhaust work and the interior redone but otherwise wouldn't hesitate to get in and take it across the country. The only reason I stopped using it was it didn't have the omph needed to pull my RV so I repalced it with a 94 Cadillac with the LT1 gas engine, soon to be replaced by either a 6.5 turbo or even maybe a Duramax (you'd think that at 58 I'd know better Confused).

Hope this helps with the decision making process.

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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great sight guys..
anybody know if the belt pullys are the same as the gas engine ? or do you know were i can get a set ?
thanks
David
 
Location: ireland | Registered: July 25, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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David:

About 95% of the various external bits are virtually interchangable between the diesel and the gassers. That does not mean that the gasser will have the same pulley arrangement as the diesel. These engines were produced from 1978 to 1985, and were used right across the GM product line. Things like AC compressors, power steering pumps alternators etc. could differ depending on what vehicle they were installed in. The only thing the diesel had that was not shared by it's gasser cousin, was the vacuum pump. Some had the vac pump driven off the cam (where the distributor would normally be) and some were belt driven as part of the pulley system.

You will find all the brackets and attachment points to be interchangable so if you have both the diesel and a gasser, you should be able to mix and match as required, assuming both were the Olds 350 engine. The 6.2/6.5 diesels (1983 to 1999) were an animal of a different sort. Motor mounts and transmission bellhousings were shared by the small and big block chevy engines but all the rest was unique to the diesel.

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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thanks for that Bill

I have two 350 DX engine with different head numbers.

One has D3A the other has D3B. Could you tell me what the difference is?
CHEERS
David
 
Location: ireland | Registered: July 25, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Probably injector size. Two types were used, both DDE (Detroit diesel) but one had a smaller thread size. If your lucky, the one with the good heads (assuming at least one set is still good...don't take it for granted) will have the adjustable nozzels. Remove the return line and look for a locking nut and a slotted thread portion on top of the injector.

With the help of a homemade tester, you can adjust these for pop off pressure and spray pattern. The other type needs to be dissassembled and shimmed to achieve the same thing.

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Bill the engines have popit type injectors. there is no return line from them.
both have the same thread.
But i have noticed the injector pumps are different. one has a second solinoid.
what could that be for ?

thanks
david
 
Location: ireland | Registered: July 25, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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The one with the single solinoid must be really old (78-79). The dual solinoid pump has a "housing pressure cold advance" solinoid as well as the fuel cut-off. The HPCA is connected in series through a temp switch, either integrated into the glowplug controller or located in the back of the passenger head. When the temp switch hits 135 F, it turns off and the HPCA closes. What this does is when it is activated it drops the housing pressure in the pump, allowing the advance piston to advance the timing by about 4 degrees. Some varients speced for mountain altitudes also used this HPCA, wired through an aneroid switch, to adjust for altitude.

The older pump will also not have the mechanical advance arm (actually retard arm, located on the passenger side of the pump) that interacts between the throttle arm and the advance piston in the bottom of the pump. The original Roosa Master pumps were designed for tractors, so had no external means to adjust the timing. The newer ones used the differential pressure of transfer pump pressure and head pressure to adjust the timing.

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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well what can i say;
thanks again for that info.
I am fitting the engine to a boat so i think i will put a rocker switch at the helm for the advance solinoid. then i can make use of it during the winter months.
I have been concidering fitting an air cooler to the engine,someone told me it will increase the performance without any side efects.also i have found a set of pullys on ebay for $75 the seller claims a 15 to 20 % increase in HP.?????
thanks again
David
 
Location: ireland | Registered: July 25, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by david gm:
well what can i say;
thanks again for that info.
I am fitting the engine to a boat so i think i will put a rocker switch at the helm for the advance solinoid. then i can make use of it during the winter months.
I have been concidering fitting an air cooler to the engine,someone told me it will increase the performance without any side efects.also i have found a set of pullys on ebay for $75 the seller claims a 15 to 20 % increase in HP.?????
thanks again
David


The advance is only there to assist in warm up. After the engine hits 135F its not needed. The temperature switch in the head should be more then sufficient.

Depending on where you are installing the engine in your boat, the aircooler may be a little bit of overkill. Venting the intake overboard should give you all the cool air you will want, depending on the ambient air temps. You might get marginal results by using a water to air heat exchanger (intercooler) but then you would need a circulation pump to keep it fed with cold water. Air density is the issue here and you will probably find out there is little or no difference within the confines of normal ambiant differences. Just feed it fresh air. Where this really helps is in turbo charged engines, cooling the blower output air.

75 bucks for a set of pulleys is a good price, but 15 to 20% more HP? Maybe he is talking about horse poo, not horse power Big Grin. Typically these pulley sets are what is refferred to as "under drive" pulleys, meaning they spin the accessory slower. Not a good thing for water pumps and alternators running constantly. Great for drag racers but not so good in a boat.

If you are installing this in a boat, are you planning on installing a marine water pump? Automotive pumps are not designed to "draw" and need something to lift the water up to the main pumps intake. Typically the main pump is operated in closed loop, either through a keel cooler or cool water is pumped in through a thermostat and exhausted through the water manifolds. If you are using the keel cooler then you will also need a pump to circulate water in the exhaust manifolds.

Happy boating. Had a friend who installed two of these in his cruiser. Actually had a custom cam built and an injection pump refitted so the port engine rotated opposite to the starboard. The boat was no speed demon, but he reduced his fuel consumption by 75%. Was able to use the stock Olds marine water jackets and fittings, used by various companies, and the Velvet Drives bolted right up. Great conversion.

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I ended up putting new rebuilt engine with 20k mile (per my mechanic) runs good but took long time to start. I decided to change the fuel filter and fuel pump since the the car has used some of the diesel that was 12 year old. Now I am faced with another problem it does not start at all. I ran out of battery juice .....I am going to get my batteries recharge morrow. Meanwhile just wondering if there is some thing else need to be done when you replace both Fuel pump (first) and Fuel filter (later)on same day.....also could you please tell me how hard it is to change the sending unite I am getting wrong readings for fuel always full...by the way what should by mile/g on this engine??
thanks in advance.

_______________________________________________________________________________________
quote:
Originally posted by Bill McD:
CCD:

I think what you are looking for is a reality check. First of all you must determine what your going to use the car for and what you are willing to pay for that useage. First you must consider the car itself.

Currently you have two major problems that are not engine related.

1. Next year the car is going to be 30 years old. Parts are now, and will continue to be harder and harder to find and if you are going to use this as your daily driver this will become a big issue.

2. The car sat for 12 years. Even if it was stored inside out of the elements, it is, at the end of the day, just a piece of machinery and all machinery deteriorates if not used. Seals dry out and crack, cables sieze up, bearings fuse etc. Even if you can get it going you will spend the next 18 months chasing hundreds of little things that would not normally fail if excercised regularly. Electrics are particularly prone to problems due to dissimilar metal corrosion.

If the car is in excellent shape overall it may have some intrinsic value as a collector car, seeing as it is the diesel. Very few of them survived intact. To preserve this value, I would consider a full body off restoration to like new condition and only drive it on the weekends, assuming you have the resources. As a gasser, its just another old chevy. As it stands now, it is merely a novelty.

Believe it or not, the engine is the least of your worries. If indeed the engine only has 20K on it, then if you have any talent with a wrench, the bottom end should only need a ring and bearing job. There should be no noticeble wear on the cylinder walls. Don't be suprised to still see the cross hatching on the walls. This engine hadn't even been broken in before it was stored. Cost of parts including a gasket set and oil pump will be less then 500 bucks.

The heads are another thing altogether. It is unlikely they have survived unscathed and they should be checked very carefully before spending any coin on them. I do believe there are a few vendors still stocking these heads (probably Chinese knock-offs...Clearwater heads in Florida has had good luck with them) and the last time I checked they were under 300 bucks each. To do it right, you should also consider the ARP stud kit and the Felpro solid copper gasket set, again about 300 bucks.

The fuel pump should be around 300 bucks to rebuild and the injectors will run you around 30 bucks a piece to rebuild. Misc. water pumps, alternators hoses etc. another 200 and, given the age, you will also need a new rad ($400.00???). The tranny should be freshened up and all the driveline, brakes and suspension should be given a good once over.

Sorry to be an advanced agent for a famine but if I was in your shoes, I would get it running as well as possible and flog it out for whatever you can get. The wagon wheel and coffee can crowd love these cars Big Grin.

As far as an alternative, Both Chevy and Buick made exceptional full size cars from 91 to 96 and the wagons are still plentiful. Good examples can be had from the south for under $1,400.00 that normally require little or no work to get them road worthy. They are known as "B" body cars and make excellent candidates for a 6.2/6.5 liter diesel conversion. Using known good used parts, you can do the conversion yourself for around 4 grand. The 91 in my sig I converted in 2002 and was used as my daily up till a year ago. Put almost 120,000 miles on it with absolutely no serious problems and it consistantly got me 36-38 MPG (IMP), alot of that mileage on bio. Needs a pump and injectors, some exhaust work and the interior redone but otherwise wouldn't hesitate to get in and take it across the country. The only reason I stopped using it was it didn't have the omph needed to pull my RV so I repalced it with a 94 Cadillac with the LT1 gas engine, soon to be replaced by either a 6.5 turbo or even maybe a Duramax (you'd think that at 58 I'd know better Confused).

Hope this helps with the decision making process.

Bill
 
Registered: June 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have read through this entire post and am astounded by all the information in it! I have a 1981 Cadillac sedan Deville with the 5.7 DX block was rebuilt at 80k miles and is now sitting at 130k and rising, reading through it's a question of performance or reliability and this thing was definitely built for reliability I travel from town to town once in a while and getting up 8% grade is a chore but found a safe way up it drop to 2nd and cruise at 35 MPH fairly low RPM's but enough to get up the hill, now this car is my daily driver and is still considerably clean and dent free paint is faded but still in excellent condition. considering this is the first diesel I have ever owned I've learned a few things with it but not enough, how can I tell if the rebuild had the ARP studs installed or if a copper head gasket was used? or if a water separator was installed as well? and lastly does anyone know what the overall dry weight of the motor is? or even wet weight. I am thinking about doing an engine swap but for a 5.9 Cummins which weighs in at about 1020lbs dry weight and want to know if the hubs assembly will handle the weight as well as the if the car will handle it i understand all the work that will need to be done such as motor mounts, transmission mounts cross members lines wires hoses brakes alot has to be done and I've got the time to do it but looking for more information since knowledge is power.


81 caddy 5.7 diesel runs like a top
 
Registered: September 15, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Caprice_Classic_Diesel:
I ended up putting new rebuilt engine with 20k mile (per my mechanic) runs good but took long time to start. I decided to change the fuel filter and fuel pump since the the car has used some of the diesel that was 12 year old. Now I am faced with another problem it does not start at all. I ran out of battery juice .....I am going to get my batteries recharge morrow. Meanwhile just wondering if there is some thing else need to be done when you replace both Fuel pump (first) and Fuel filter (later)on same day.....also could you please tell me how hard it is to change the sending unite I am getting wrong readings for fuel always full...by the way what should by mile/g on this engine??
thanks in advance.


The fuel filter will have a top drain, allowing you to bleed the filter. As long as no air has been introduced, you should have no problems.

Typically the sender unit is installed through the top of the fuel tank. This will require you to remove the tank. Before doing this, there will be a plug located near the tank to connect up with the sending unit. Check your gauge by grounding out this connection. This will make the gauge read empty. If the gauge reads full all the time, it is likely that the connection has been lost between the sender and the gauge. Do a resistance check on the sender. Full it should read 60 to 80 ohms while empty you should be getting only 5 to 10 ohms.

Typically these cars were good for mid 30s for fuel mileage and could achieve low 40s with a light foot.

quote:
I have read through this entire post and am astounded by all the information in it! I have a 1981 Cadillac sedan Deville with the 5.7 DX block was rebuilt at 80k miles and is now sitting at 130k and rising, reading through it's a question of performance or reliability and this thing was definitely built for reliability I travel from town to town once in a while and getting up 8% grade is a chore but found a safe way up it drop to 2nd and cruise at 35 MPH fairly low RPM's but enough to get up the hill, now this car is my daily driver and is still considerably clean and dent free paint is faded but still in excellent condition. considering this is the first diesel I have ever owned I've learned a few things with it but not enough, how can I tell if the rebuild had the ARP studs installed or if a copper head gasket was used? or if a water separator was installed as well? and lastly does anyone know what the overall dry weight of the motor is? or even wet weight. I am thinking about doing an engine swap but for a 5.9 Cummins which weighs in at about 1020lbs dry weight and want to know if the hubs assembly will handle the weight as well as the if the car will handle it i understand all the work that will need to be done such as motor mounts, transmission mounts cross members lines wires hoses brakes alot has to be done and I've got the time to do it but looking for more information since knowledge is power.


If the engine was a standard rebuild, then none of the upgrades would have been included. To check for the ARP studs, or for that matter, any studs you will have to remove one of the valve covers. If it has bolt heads then obviously it doesn't have studs. If it has nuts and washers, then you have them. If the engine has been modified for the copper gaskets, then there is no way to really tell without pulling the heads. The block and heads have to to be grooved for "fire rings" if a solid gasket is used.

The added wieght of the Cummins is only the start of your problems. You will have to swap out the entire drivetrain. The trannys and rear axles will be twisted up like a pretzel if you put that much torque into them. At the very least you will need a beefed up 400 and a very stout rear axle like a Dana or Ford 9 inch.

A project like this is doable but it really is an exercise in determination. The Cummins is just too long, too high and too powerful for these cars. Goes into the category of "with enough money you can do anything".

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I'm curious about the solid copper head gasket. I was told in another forum to use the Victor .010 over head gasket. Which one would be better? Also how are you guys getting 35 mpgs? I only get 22 mpg's driving with an egg between my foot and the pedals.


1981 Olds 98 Regency diesel
 
Registered: September 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Turbo.bimmer:
I'm curious about the solid copper head gasket. I was told in another forum to use the Victor .010 over head gasket. Which one would be better? Also how are you guys getting 35 mpgs? I only get 22 mpg's driving with an egg between my foot and the pedals.


The Victor gaskets work just fine providing the head and block are flat and you use either the updated headbolts or the aftermarket alternative.

I've owned several of these diesel cars (currently have 3) and I've never gotten 35MPG with any of them. My '82 Custon Cruiser has gotten a best of 29MPG on the highway (2.93:1 rear axle ratio with a 2004R overdrive), an 83 Cierra (gone) with the 4.3 V6, 2.39:1 ratio and 125C direct drive 3 speed transaxle that got in the low 30's (lockup converters work on both), a 260 powered 79 Cutlass (2.41:1 non lockup 3 speed auto) that has gotten a best of 29MPG. I still also have an 81 custon Cruiser with a 2.73 axle and 3 speed lockup transmission than never got over 23MPG.


And on the eigth day the LORD created the turbocharger
 
Location: Watertown, NY/Ocala, FL | Registered: August 14, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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