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home made Outdoor wood boiler
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being a mechanic myself I can appreciate the work invested in that Nova Bob.Looks good


21 years off the grid and counting

 
Location: Muskoka, Ont, Can | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yeah Bob that is me. Did I meet you at Daves or in town somewhere? I cant remember since I meet so many people just once up here. They stop in all the time looking for Rodger and parts I dont have.

Im working on the fuel supply for the oil burner, trying to figure it out and get the barrel setup outside for a gravity feed. Should be up and running tomorrow to see how it works. If you can get it lit WVO will burn in it too, getting it going is the problem with it.

Im trying something simple and low buck to heat water, and water isnt the main heat source, its more like grabbing some more heat before it goes up the pipe. So even if it doesnt heat the water super efficiently, it should still work. I just dont want to boil it, about 150F would work good for me. The oil burner wont be the only heat source, almost have the second source workable. Probably sometime after Dec 1 when I get another check.

More on the second source if it works well enough.
 
Location: Marquette MI. in da U.P. eh! | Registered: April 20, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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..hi all..

..i've not finished reading the thread but one thing comes to mind..

..expansion tanks and refill systems. Cheap plastic exapnsion tanks , like water cisterns are fine, and small is ok, say 2 feet square. The expansion pipe curves over into the tank, and the refill is done using a simple toilet float valve set to close at say 3 inches from the base of the tank. the refill attaches to the cold return pipe. Use wide pipe say 1 inch for the expansion, but standard 1/2 inch for the refill..

..usual practice on most central heating systems in the UK. an option is a pressure valve but the buggers always stick..
 
Location: ..southern Mindanao, 1500 ft up in the Bunduks | Registered: December 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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..ok, some questions..

..why are you all using water jackets when metal piping thru the fire-box is so much more efficient ? ok s'a bit more difficult to put together, but at 12 inches or so from the heat source you can switch to wonderful glue-together plastic pipes..

..i'm looking to build a copras drying shed using hot water heating, a revolution in Philippine coconut production, from what i can see Cool with a spur to heat a germination house and another to heat the hut and provide hot water. The whole to basically use the outer layer of the coconut as fuel, so low temp burn, but free fuel and a far more efficient use of my work force..
 
Location: ..southern Mindanao, 1500 ft up in the Bunduks | Registered: December 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've seen a lot of good information here. And I appriciate all of it, but I have a couple of questions.
1. Are there any concerns to using an old hot water heater for a expansion tank?

2. How important is an air vent, or an, air eliminator/purger, fill/pressure reducing valve?

Any information on these three items would also be helpful.

**I am looking into building a closed loop system. With constant pump pressure.
 
Registered: November 11, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Keeping the steam power under control is the big concern. It will make things pop surprisingly quickly and effectively.

A water heater has at least one blow off valve, and I will be using at least one water heater tank if not more for my shop system. I am looking for volume more than flow, more water takes longer to cool is the thinking behind it.

Thinking of it like an automotive cooling system, you dont want air in the system. Home heating might be different, but thats the direction I am headed. A puke tank and a fill at the top of the system to keep air out, and allow any out that forms from boiling the water. To a certain point more pressure in the system raises the boiling point allowing more heat to transfer.

Like I said, Im not an HVAC guy, just a car guy so it might be different.

White rabbit I am using an external jacket due to simplicity and mobility. I dont need the heat all year, but I do need the space the heater uses when its not needed. The way I am configuring it I wont have to break the system to move the heat source.
 
Location: Marquette MI. in da U.P. eh! | Registered: April 20, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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got any picture of it?
kindly post a complete drawing of this complete unit so that we can all understand it better
 
Registered: December 03, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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oh have not being to this site in a while.. just catching up.. the water return is at the bottom of the tank. and hot exits hot at the top ( with in 3" - 6" of the the top water level, the system is a zero pressure system any other home made system that is not zero pressure is just bomb waiting to happen.. it cheaper to add water then to worry about it exploding.. I ran my stuff for 10 years with out ever using antifreeze.. just use a constant flow pump on 3/4" POLY pipe or use 1 1/4 line and then the pump does not have to be constant flow.. just use simple polyethylene piping. and if you want if your using 3/4 line put down 1 1/4 then feed the 3/4 through.. or by water noodle ( the one with the center hole) slice them in to the center and insert the 3/4 line in them for an extreme well insulated line
 
Registered: April 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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@ boardmaker yes use it will warp and deform just use good steel ( mine is about 1/8 probably a little less) for the top piece in the fire box cup it up when you weld it in. that way when it heats it very hot it has a direction to move and it will not warp. same with the back insert walls but really it does not matter too much if they do warp a little .. but you can reduce it by simply shaping the steal to be able to flex in one specific direction..
 
Registered: April 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I live in central MI. and looking for someone that builds outdoor wood burner. I have 1/4 in ap plate ready to build...............
 
Registered: September 08, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sash:
@ boardmaker yes use it will warp and deform just use good steel ( mine is about 1/8 probably a little less) for the top piece in the fire box cup it up when you weld it in. that way when it heats it very hot it has a direction to move and it will not warp. same with the back insert walls but really it does not matter too much if they do warp a little .. but you can reduce it by simply shaping the steal to be able to flex in one specific direction..
 
Location: belvidere tennessee | Registered: January 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Originally posted by sash:
@ boardmaker yes use it will warp and deform just use good steel ( mine is about 1/8 probably a little less) for the top piece in the fire box cup it up when you weld it in. that way when it heats it very hot it has a direction to move and it will not warp. same with the back insert walls but really it does not matter too much if they do warp a little .. but you can reduce it by simply shaping the steal to be able to flex in one specific direction..


Every one I build goes to a heat treater to have it normalized, they bring the whole thing to cherry red and then let it slowly cool down, when it is normalized it will not warp or crack.
 
Location: West Michigan | Registered: April 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One of the most common problems I`ve seen is that the firebox leaks. It doesn`t matter if it`s boiler plate or stainless. Would it be possible to have a water bladder or hose(flexible)surrounding the firebox? Made of fireproof material. It would be great if people would post pictures of their creations!
 
Registered: November 05, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Buckster
-Why would the fire box leak? do you use boiler colloid or any other anti corrosive product. My boiler (500 gal) has been in use for 12 years, it is constructed of 3/16 mild steel. Tom


" I don't know what I don't know until I know"
1994 GMC 6.5 Tubo 2005 Dodge ram 3500, 3 VW's 2000, 2002, 2005.
 
Location: Manitoba Canada | Registered: March 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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BIOTOM The problem area seems to be around the doors. The manufacturer provides a small amount of water treatment saying that`s all you need. The firebox rust`s from the fire side in. I`ve talked to a local welder and it`s a common thing.Could it be that they`re burning green wood and too cool a fire causing creosote build up which corrodes through the box?
 
Registered: November 05, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Buckstar
-yes the cool fire could be part of the problem, BUT I think it has more to do with design.The door area is a week point for sure when it comes to expansion and contraction. I framed the hole with 2 x 6 Tube, then I cut openings in it to allow water in.(water cooled door frame) this removes the high stress point caused by expansion and contraction.

-Here's a pic of my fire box

Tom

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Biotom,


" I don't know what I don't know until I know"
1994 GMC 6.5 Tubo 2005 Dodge ram 3500, 3 VW's 2000, 2002, 2005.
 
Location: Manitoba Canada | Registered: March 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Registered: July 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am looking to build my own outdoor wood burning stove. ASAP I will be heating my 1800 square foot house and my 30x40 shop. I will be heating my shop right away and may not use it to heat the house even this year just have to see. I have all equipment to build it just have questions.
I like this design seems simply to do http://www.deb-design.com/palbrsam.pdf But it is not the full set of plans I really don't want to purchase them do to being on a budget. So not sure how the water lines are plumbed inside the water jacket. I am downsizing it a tad the out side will be 4x4x4 then about 8 inches smaller or so around for the fire box. I have to play around and see what kind of water capity I can get like that. I would like to see if anybody has some easier or cheaper setup with a how to.
Thanks In advance
 
Registered: December 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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badbowtie
-this boiler was origanally designed to burn wood and has since been modified to burn waste motor oil, it will also burn the glycerol by product.The water jacket ho;ds 500 gallons Tom

Waste motor oil/ By-product burner

This burner will burn waste motor oil and by-product from the transesterfication process.
http://darrenaffleck.smugmug.c...02653896_p3ADG-L.jpg
This picture shows all the components of the burner.
http://darrenaffleck.smugmug.c...02657680_dTBiu-L.jpg
Description of burner parts:
Top left – electrode holder made from 2 pieces of ½ pipe 2” long and 1 piece of ¾ X 3/16 flat bar 1” long pipes are drilled and nuts welded on to accept 5/16 set screws. The flat bar is also drilled 5/16, this is the attachment point.
Below electrode holder is a lower thermostat from a hot water tank
Below that, two 3/8 flat washers with one side bent up. This will grip the aluminum edge of the thermostat to hold it in place
Below that, is an agricultural spray nozzle and it’s components (T Jet hollow cone )
To the right is the heating element that keeps a small amount of oil hot and ready for ignition the heater is an external oil pan heater from a Honda vehicle, the manufacturer is phillips and tempo industries pt# 3400005. this element has a 90 degree bend in it, but it is not hard to tap it straight.
To the right of the element is the element cover , this is a section cut from a 1 ½” square tube
To the right of the element cover is the burner body. It is a piece of 1 1/14 tube 12” long, but this length or size of tube can be changed to suit your needs. The nozzle end of the square tube is welded closed using a chuck of 3/16 thick material. The opposite end has a 1/4 dia pipe x 2”long welded to a plate that fits in the end of the square tube, and is welded in place. On top of the square tube is attached a ¼ x 16” length of pipe, close as possible to the burner end a short piece of ¼ pipe is welded at 90 degrees to the 16” pipe, then that assembly is welded to the square tube. Two inches from the burner end, weld a 5/16 x 1” bolt, this bolt is the anchor point for the electrode holder. Similarly, bolts will be welded to the right side of the tube to correspond with the holes in the element cover. And again two bolts are welded to the left side of the square tube near the oil input end, to fasten the thermostat.
Here is a crude drawing of the burner assembly
http://darrenaffleck.smugmug.c...04644734_Ehobs-L.jpg

The next 3 pictures are of the fire box from different angles. Remember, this boiler was originally designed to burn cord wood. The fire box is just over 4 ft long.
http://darrenaffleck.smugmug.c...06015630_Euyun-L.jpg
http://darrenaffleck.smugmug.c...05800348_KT3Zi-L.jpg
http://darrenaffleck.smugmug.c...05800338_k5M8f-L.jpg

This picture is of the outer water jacket, all the pieces get welded inside and out to this stage, then the fire box is installed from the back, after which the back is welded on.
http://darrenaffleck.smugmug.c...06015658_9d7ef-L.jpg

This is the finished product
http://darrenaffleck.smugmug.c...06016611_SxZDr-L.jpg


" I don't know what I don't know until I know"
1994 GMC 6.5 Tubo 2005 Dodge ram 3500, 3 VW's 2000, 2002, 2005.
 
Location: Manitoba Canada | Registered: March 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great pic`s Tom. Are those vertical 2x4 box tubing on the sides to prevent warping and do they contain water? Also, does the two smokepipes come together across the back? Thanks for the great info!
 
Registered: November 05, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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