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I'm still around. Don't spend much time on the web anymore with more important things to do and cell reception sucks at my place. I've got another array to get up and turning, means building a new base but no big deal. It won't be as high as the first with more trees out of the way. Still building bio too with another 100L yesterday, the jetta likes it better than dino, it's obvious.

Nasa wasn't around for /36 Dualfuel (as you probably know) so it was delivered elsewhere for 15 years or so before they were able to tag it. I'm wondering if it has a military background and then sent over as extra? I don't know I just get a military signal from it. I remember seeing another old Case crawler about 25 years ago with a 2-71 in it. Looked similar but with the arms in the way it's hard to tell.

I've got a /47 2n tractor here, not farming equipment either but it's hard to kill


21 years off the grid and counting

 
Location: Muskoka, Ont, Can | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Dan,
Did you ever get that Cummins powered generator going?
It is amazing to me that I have been totally off grid for over 18 months and haven't really noticed it.
I made some fuel for an couple of different concerns this year. They all act the same way... "Its great fuel, we really love it, do you have any more to give away? What do you mean you have to charge us for the ingredients? Then thats the end of it, even if I bring in the price under pump diesel, if they have to pay, they don't want it. Oh well, fraking will provide endless cheap crude right? I just found it ironic that people act the same way. I was so naive.
We have a nice little cabin now, off the beaten path, its taken the last year to get it together but its coming along nice now.
I have oak now. Thousands of cords worth of tree tops windrowed in piles around my land. I bought them from the loggers rather then let the chippers take it all away. So now I have a lot of bull work ahead of me. I have been slowly refurbishing the Prentice G log loader, getting it ready to help the stacking and loading. I would really like to get moving on a producer the fuel the Prentice with. Those oak branches would make perfect fuel.
Anyhow, would like to hear from any and all of the old gang here.
yours
DF


"I don't work with collectives. I don't consult, I don't co-operate, I don't collaborate."
Howard Roark
 
Location: Calumet, Michigan, Great White North | Registered: January 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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OMG
I just read my posting from may 2011. OOOOPS don't use WVO as engine oil...I found out that it does nothing but get extremely sooty and plug up the 6.2. I had some serious clatter that lasted through two mineral oil changes last summer til it quieted down. Big mistake I think for diesel. I have been using it in things like Briggs and Stratton mowers and the old farmall. Had no problems. I guess that was what gave me the idea to use it in the 6.2, took awhile but I found out it was a bad call.
DF


"I don't work with collectives. I don't consult, I don't co-operate, I don't collaborate."
Howard Roark
 
Location: Calumet, Michigan, Great White North | Registered: January 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Perhaps as I get older, I tend to look backward more often but do you guys realize that effective April of this year, this particular thread has been alive for 10 years Eek. Dan started it in April of 2003. That has to be some sort of record for a single thread.

Not many of the originals still left. I joined in July of 2002 and if memory serves, the main posters were Neutral, Tilley and a bunch of others I can't remember from OZ. Shawn was more active on the discussion side, and left us pretty much alone. Shame he was forced to intervene when all the newbies got their noses out of joint and gave Tilley the bums rush out the door.

This thread has survived Dan building his off-grid home in the Muskokas, Dual Fuel building his home on the island and taking his extended holiday from hell over in the sand box. Following this particular thread really tracks some incredible stuff done by a lot of people and has no doubt inspired a bunch to get out and do their own thing. For that, this thread has to be commended, especially considering it never did degenerate into the name calling and testosterone feeding frenzies elsewhere on this site.

I am sorry to say I only have one diesel left in the fleet, and that only gets used to plow my laneway. The rest of the truck is an accident waiting to happen. Sold the bio-diesel setup, insurance company got a tad concerned, and long tale short, life happened. Going to hook up the house to NG next summer (just went through 2K in furnace oil and it's only the end of January). Still an advocate, and I still keep up with the industry, but until we wrestle the bio from slime thing to earth, can't really see it as viable on a wide scale, not to mention the quality of the commercial stuff is going to need to be much better before we see it usable in the newer common rail stuff.

DF, you were responsible for getting me interested in gasifiers and I thank you. Am now fully engaged in industrial applications of this technology. Quite a steep learning curve for an old guy but am having the time of my life. We have been able to accomplish a lot and are getting a good name for our selves in the industry. You might get a kick out of this, but the older methodologies (oxidizing gasifiers)are turning out to be the most dependable,durable and only about 1/10th of the cost. Never thought I would be investigating steam in this day and age. Visited an installation in Arkansas that has been in continuous operation for 32 years. Most of the current crop of companies haven't been in business that long.

Don't post much anymore but I still come back occasionally and browse. Really happy to see not all of the old guys have left, but frankly, it used to be a whole lot more fun when we were all rejects from the JTF site.

Thanks for putting up with my ramblings.

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Bill,
Glad to hear or read that you are still busy and doing interesting things. I still remember that call I made a couple of years ago. The courier de bois had an air bubble in the cooling system and I changed three water pumps before your voice talked me through my panic back to sanity.
I have a really fun 6.2 problem now...the plow suburban's injector pump finally gave it up. After 6 years, it slowly (oh so slowly) got harder and harder to start. Had to spin the engine faster and faster to get the pump to give enough fuel to run. At the end, it would only start with ether. I kept using ether to the bitter end. I have never run one of these engines to destruction in this manner. No drama, it just wouldn't start at the end. Just for sanity's sake and the idea that somebody who doesn't know us would read this, a healthy 6.2 sprayed with ether, will immediately blow one or both starter bolts out. The suburban engine would not even pre ignite the ether, it just spun over. Bill, I suspect I had no compression either.
So this reminds me, I need a source for new 6.2 injector pumps. I think I need at least one for the new fresh new suburban I am putting together.
Yes this thread is like a good family. John O., RAV, Dave in England, Dan, writing to youse is like stopping at the coffee shop on a cold winter's day and getting away from it all for a while.

I also followed the rise and fall of girl mark on this forum. Her lingering prescence is still felt every time I read something about or from all power labs in Oakland.
Me, I am living the dream. I left my armchair in the house in town when they tore it down. Now I actually walk the walk. At least six months out of the year I have free electric power, the rest of the time I scramble to see what works best. I love it though, because I have seperated all the Alt power BS from what really works in our enviroment here. Here is my top 5 alt power list
1. Gasoline
2. Honda EU3000i
3. Kyrocera KDX135 panels (with junction box)
4. Xantrex C60 charge controllers
5. Trojan T-105 batteries

If you have these things, you can conquer the world! Err, at least keep a drip coffee pot going year round.
Today I am trying out a Verizon Jet Pack 4G internet wifi hot spot zuper duper thingy. I really like it. It allows us here (beyond the pale), to have hi speed internet. Now if it could remotely repair, start, and operate the snow blower truck, I would seriously consider trading my first born for it (especially if he doesn't stop picking his nose and finish his homework.).
Anyhow, it'll be a couple of months before I ramp up season eleven of biodiesel production.
Later,
DF


"I don't work with collectives. I don't consult, I don't co-operate, I don't collaborate."
Howard Roark
 
Location: Calumet, Michigan, Great White North | Registered: January 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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DF:

Certainly happy you have worked out some of the bugs in your island home and that things are to your liking. You accomplished something many of us could only dream of. Can't believe Buda is old enough to have homework. Proves time is that unrelenting monster that keeps charging along despite all of our efforts.

I remember your coolant issues. Happened to me a number of times. As far as your pump problem, that's exactly how they go but if you rip the engine apart you'll probably find the pre-chambers have much larger fire ports than originally designed. Typical result of feeding them an ether diet.

I have always used "Valley Diesel" in British Columbia to rebuild my pumps. A little more pricey than the norm but they all came back to me better than stock. Jamie at "The Diesel Depot" in Georgia always has a good supply of either known good pumps or ones that have been rebuilt locally and his prices are good. Typical central Georgia attitude about answering his phone but when you do get a hold of him he is great to deal with.

In regards to your desire for a consistent and reliable source of power I have been playing around with an idea for over 20 years now that I have never had the time or resources to investigate properly. As I mentioned in the previous post, I find myself digging back in the history books to familiarize myself with steam power, which rekindled my interest in my old idea.

In the early 90s I was helping out a friend who was manufacturing ground source heat pumps. At the time we had achieved installed COP levels of 3:1 (for every watt in we got 3 out). We were using open loop, deep well water and at 12 gallon per minute flow rates at 48F we were able to produce 100,000 BTUs/hr with plenum temps of 110F. If we cranked up the head pressures we could get 125F but that loaded the compressor pretty badly.

My original thoughts was to replace the condenser with an expansion engine but at best I could only expect about a 15% conversion rate to mechanical energy giving me only 4HP. As the compressor chewed up 5hp and the water pump 1hp, that left me wanting for 2hp to achieve unity. Never got the chance to explore the hypothesis so the idea has languished in the back of my head since, though i did explore the concept of a sterling engine.

I figured that if you could use the incoming water at 48F on the cold end and the hotter refrigerant at 125F you would achieve a delta T of 77 degrees while recovering some of the lost efficiency and imparting it into the incoming water. Well within the operational perimeters of a sterling engine but even my least conservative numbers would only give me about 2 hp over system requirements. 1,500 watts seemed hardly worth it. Again I didn't have the resources to test out my idea.

I revisited this concept while researching something else a year ago and discovered that the industry is now using a COP of 5:1 as the norm. Haven't re-run my numbers yet but that should be a game changer, especially since they all seem to be quoting these figures based upon ground loops with minimal temperature drops on the circulating water. Using a deep well in an open loop should increase this COP significantly.

If in fact we could put this together with 5hp, over the system needs, that would mean we could produce 3,700 watts, consistently, 24 hours a day. Enough to run virtually any household effectively that isn't using electricity for heat.

Unfortunately with my current obligations and the fact that I'll be 61 next June, I don't see myself ever getting the chance to put this theory into practice. I guess it wasn't in the cards. None the less if you, or for that matter anyone else, wants to explore this concept I would be happy to assist. Figure if anyone could make this work it would be you. If it works just give me honorable mention.

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Dear Bill,
I will start perculating on your idea. It made the rounds several years ago on the gasification list. A fellow in Belize was going to do something similiar and use either propane or butane for a working fluid in a closed organic rankine cycle system.
I actually have water from a spring so pumping loss would be minimal. A mile east of here is an artesian bore hole from the diamond drilling exploration days.
In one sense I too, want to claim that I have no time to develop something outside my comfort zone but...I realize that I am also going to run out of physical strength to heat with wood and have been thinking about some kind of alternative. I have been wanting to heat with wind electric (and yes we have the wind at this place). But, the water is flowing right out of the ground about a 100 yards from where I am typing, so it too has to be considered.
Look up the Jeane Pain Method. I have been considering something like that too. Sometimes I get the free use of an excavating company. The owner is retired and bored, so he comes over and digs.
Phone number for mister injector pump man in Georgia? Valley in O' Canada?
This season could be the biggest BD making season ever. I stopped collecting oil as I have no more barrels to put it in.
Bill, I am not satisfied with what I am doing here. I am reduced to being a homebuilder and wood cutter. I really want to be welding together another producer for use on the prentice loader. But...I am also extremely grateful for the chance to build my own little cottage and do it right. So its not a complaint but rather more of a nostalgic longing for some other more exciting activity.
So the fire ports cause a loss of compression I suppose new heads would be in order. Maybe next time, right now I still have extra engines.
You sir, need to write a pamphlet about your knowledge of the 6.2 (before its lost). I hate to be morbud but...I have gone 18 months with no internet and have discovered that I am unable to get parts locally for Continental engines, International tractors, junk chevys, old Briggs and Stratton engines, Wisconsin engines, etc. This because all the men who knew anything about them have died off. The internet is the last place left with a practical means of finding info and parts for old engines.
Later
DF


"I don't work with collectives. I don't consult, I don't co-operate, I don't collaborate."
Howard Roark
 
Location: Calumet, Michigan, Great White North | Registered: January 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Duel Fuel:

Sorry for the delay but lost my computer last week. HD went clunk and then game over. Why can't they make HDs that last longer then 8 years?

It's not a question of moving out of my comfort zone (what I'm doing now is so far out that I have forgotten where my comfort zone is) but rather time. For the past 3 years it's been 14 hour days, 6 or 7 days a week. My hope is that I can cash in within the next 3 or 4 years with enough to replace my retirement fund.

If and when that happens its into the RV and off to explore this continent while we are still young enough to enjoy it. I have been blessed with a wife that has the patience of Jobe. She deserves a little exclusive time with me. Projects will have to take a back seat.

Anyways, here is the information you requested:

Diesel Depot
227 N Hospital Rd, Sandersville, GA 31082
478) 552-9510

Can't seem to get a hold of Jamie. He did indicate that there was some family issues but he has never gone this long without calling back. Hope he's alright. If you really get frustrated, call his dad (Benny)at:

Avant Salvage Co
219 Waco Dr, Sandersville, GA 31082
http://www.avantsalvage.com
(478) 552-1901

Benny can also help you with any bits you need for the 6.2/6.5

For a really good pump overhaul try:

Valley Fuel Injection Ltd
Address: 33723 King Rd, Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M9
Phone:+1 800-887-5030

They bought out BD Performance Diesel. Pricy but so far I have been really happy.

Its also a good idea to get the injectors replaced/overhauled at the same time. Seems everytime I have cheaped out and just replaced the pump, the injectors have gone south within 6 months.

Hope this helps

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Scatch the Diesel Depot and Avant Salvage for now. Have been unable to contact Jamie and it seems Benny's number has been disconnected???

Will be down in that neck of the woods in April so will take a side trip to see whats up. Hope its not serious as I really like the guys. Jamis built and delivered a sweet 6.5 center mount turbo that I speced for a friend of mine in December but have not been able to contact them since.

Still a pile of stuff available for these engines but it was nice to have a "one stop" shop for these engines.

Valley is still good and will treat you right.

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Its opening day here...err I got tired of waiting for the 4 feet of snow to melt. I took the loader and made a path to the oil shed and started a batch of fuel. Hence, opening day. I have been seeing a lot of those grease dumpsters here lately. I wonder if this is going to be a repeat of the cycle where they put them up here, then discover its too expensive to come and get the oil. Seems like that goes around every few years. I would get greedy and worry about it but there are simply too many resturants that I have been getting oil from for the last ten years and those guys won't pay anybody for a dumpster, they'd rather dump it in the bush.

I asked Rick about this, and Bill, you were the only one in north america who knew what I was talking about....cracking oil, tires, plastic, or wood? Anybody? I see it going on in Russia, Japan, and the oil field. Is anybody cracking WVO or Glycerin?

I am working on a retort this summer.

DF


"I don't work with collectives. I don't consult, I don't co-operate, I don't collaborate."
Howard Roark
 
Location: Calumet, Michigan, Great White North | Registered: January 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi DF:
Will be trying plastic in the charcoal gasifier, as the temps and configuration will absorb any tars that aren't incinerated. Glad to hear you are firing up again.


Live it large
 
Location: Nova Scotia | Registered: October 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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DF:

Actually gasifying non-organic hydro carbons makes more sense. Trying to crack it would produce a witches brew. Using an anerobic gasifier and then treating the fuel gas makes for a more environmentally friendly solution.

Have no idea if it could be done on the home scale, but have been looking closely at hydro thermal liquifaction. It involves suspending the bio-mass in water and taking the whole mess up to the point where the water is in a super critical state. About 400C and 5,000 PSI.

Apparently super critical water has some unique properties including allowing hydro carbon pyrolysis oil to remain in emulsion. While maintaing the pressure, when the temps are dropped to 70C and then released to atmosphere, the water and oil seperate and the water is recycled or purified and released. The guys in Denmark are claiming an energy balance of over 80% and close to 100% conversion rate on the bio-mass for the process and the resultant oil has the HC composition and energy content of #1 West Texas Sweet, without all the nasty heavy metals, salts and especially sulphur.

Good use for this technology is apparently animal and human manure Would put a whole new meaning on the phrase "my engine runs like sh###t.". Works with any hydro carbon that can be kept in suspension in water.

Going to try this one on our squints at the University and try to make a lab scale version this summer. Might even convince them to design a low temperature, lab scale cracking tower and make some fuel for testing. Still driving my gasser Cadillac so it might get some of the experimental fuel.

Excuse my ignorance but what is a "retort"? Obviously not the conventional meaning of the word.

Did you get the bits you want for the 6.2? Jamie down in Georgia seems to be back on-line. Was talking to him the other day and we are planning on getting together next week when Carol and I go through peanut country on the way to Florida. March 29 equals official end of winter for us Big Grin

Hope spring huuries up for you on the island.

Bill


91 Buick Roadmaster wagon, GM 6.2 diesel conversion (gone but not forgotten
89 GMC 6.2 (Just got rid of the last pieces)
84 Mercedes 300D (gone to the great autobahn in the sky)
94 Cadillac Fleetwood (Sold before I could convert it)
 
Location: Manotick, Ontario Canada | Registered: July 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Bill that is exactly what we do to remove the oil (bitumen) from the steam up here in Alberta. As far as burning plastic, there is a man in Penn that is introducing plastic pellets (reclaimed shredded) plastic to the charcoal gasifier after it has been fired on the orgional charcoal. He is haveing more than acceptable results. He does this by introducing the plastic into the central air intake tube. Once introduced to the "blast furnace" everything is burnt off producing gas. What isn't burnt off fully is absorbed into the charcoal filter bed above the ignition zone and burned later.


Live it large
 
Location: Nova Scotia | Registered: October 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Bill, Hi Rav,
Non-organic hydro-carbons.....is that like government effciency? Or the eye of the Nematode?

Yes, these guys fill a tank with tires, close the door, put a fire underneath and heat the tires till they destructively distill. Then they condense the condensate. A retort. What do youse call it, a coke oven?

No, I haven't worked on the 6.2s yet. Still have four feet of snow on the ground and no shop yet. I will be pouring a shop to work in this spring/summer.

Yes, its looking like a very exciting summer to be making fuel. EIA claims fuel prices will stay the same, but with the US economy heating up, I think fuel will start climbing as soon as those contractors start up those dump trucks.
I have some irons in the fire, and if things work out, I may be taking a trip out JohnO's way to get a nice rustless 6.2 truck. We'll see how spring break up goes.

DF


"I don't work with collectives. I don't consult, I don't co-operate, I don't collaborate."
Howard Roark
 
Location: Calumet, Michigan, Great White North | Registered: January 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You guys in the frozen North still put up the most interesting ideas.

Good to see that most of you are still around. I've been out of the bio for a while, but found a few gallon I made a while back and after filtering it and putting it in the tank I realised how much cash I was saving (our Diesel is around $2.10 US per Litre)so I must make the effort and get back into harness.

Did I'm read somewhere that one of you youngsters is starting to feel his age (at nearly 61) I'm 69 in August, not as sprightly as I used to be, but hanging in there.

Keep warm,safe and live forever.

Dave

dva Smile
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Dave, you have entered a dangerous level mentioning age, don't you realize that you'll have all the wrinklies jumping in to state how old they are? I'm 78, lol, and still brewing.
Sometimes when I drive down the highway I'll see someone doing something stupid and refer to him as a stupid old ...... then realize that he's probably a lot younger than me.
Believe me it doesn't take long to get old.
Jim.
 
Location: Cape Town | Registered: May 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jim,

Nice to read you are still brewing; and driving.

I guess I should sit back and wait for the 'When I was a lad....' comments to start.

A few week ago I was asked go go back into work to fill out for someone who was on holiday. It was then I realised that I was the oldest in the place.

Does it bother me ? no, I've always avoided mirrors; honest.

Keep on brewing, just get some young whipper snapper to give a lift with the heavy stuff. That's what they are there for.

Dave. Smile
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hello everyone. It's good to read you guys again. I guess I'm the young guy here at 52 but I can still feel old every now and then when it suits me. I'm still plugging away around the house, the new mast has a base now and it's time to start mounting the post for the next array. I haven't done a whole lot around here but at least I'm getting some motivation again. I picked up an 18 hp Kabota lawn mower off the township auction. It runs pretty good for the abuse it's had and if the mower goes for a crap I'll still have a 3 cyl diesel for stationary power.

Hope the projects go well with little complications and the used oil flows freely. I will be brewing again shortly so long as the bears don't join the party.

shut me down last year


21 years off the grid and counting

 
Location: Muskoka, Ont, Can | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Dan,

Getting motivated is the hard part.
I'm ok once I get started. Whether it's making something or just pulling weeds.
This year I built a raised concrete block platform in the garden to take the table and chairs ready for sitting in the sun. Just need the sun. Also put up a green house. After last years wet weather I thought it the only way to go. It works well, but my neighbors rabbit is getting fed up of eating my surplus lettuce.

At least I don't have to keep an eye out for bears here in the UK.

Regards to all,

Dave. Smile
 
Location: Yorks,England | Registered: June 30, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ha! Was I wrong...I spent the summer hauling wood and hauling fill for a road. I am at 1200 yards right now and halfway across an 1/8 mile peat bog. The dump truck, excavator, and grader, all fueled on B100, of course. I ended up with a Washington Suburban with a 6.2 but only had to go to Iron Mountain...about 120 miles south to get it.. apparently another guy had the same idea but ran out of cash after he brought it home...nice rig.
The bears are over at the neighbor's bear bait pile...yay! so I don't have to monkey with them this year....although Herr Schtockelschwein is nawing on a salty board under the shed...
BTW Dan, I finally found that pump you mailed me...after I moved, I could not figure out where it went, and it still works fine...thx again.

Just bought another pot burner oil space heater...and the guy gave two more that were in a cabin. The two free ones are small DuoTherms and the one is small enough to fit in the camp...cool! $30
DF


"I don't work with collectives. I don't consult, I don't co-operate, I don't collaborate."
Howard Roark
 
Location: Calumet, Michigan, Great White North | Registered: January 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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