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The Spinner Centrifuge Plans: Review
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I think the problem with a liquid balance ring will show up at some point during the spin-up of the rotor, depends on how solidly the rotor is mounted as to weather it causes a problem or not. I tried using a washmachine spin cycle for oil, the basket is lightly spring loaded to allow a good bit of movement and it has a horizontal liquid balancer around the top. The basket was about 1/3 full of vegoil as it started spinning but at some point during the runup the vegoil in the basket would shift and cause the basket to start wiggeling, this threw off the liquid in the balancer and the two fluids started fighting against one another, the thing tried to tear itself apart before I could get it shut down. If the rotor is run up to speed empty and if the basket is mounted on a solid shaft this may not be a problem ?
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Buuuuud,
ive been ready all of this with much excitement and would like to order a set of plans.
What is the paypal acct. that i need to send it to.
p.s. how much is the total?
 
Location: portland, oregon | Registered: September 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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apwdistributing,

The price is $27.50 which includes S/H and my e-mail is on my profile that will take you to PayPal. You are only 2hrs south of me, you could come and look me in the eye and probably get a better rate. Also I could feed you a line of crap that will choak a dog and give you a personal demonstration. You can't beat a deal like that, even with a stick.

That's how it looks for both of us, here in the West.

Buuuuud
 
Location: Morton, Wash. USA | Registered: February 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Chariotdriver,

Check your messages. Thanks Neumannn


[QUOTE]Originally posted by Chariotdriver:
I too am working on a centrifuge using Buuds plans and have come into a source of centrifuges that will work for what we need when I get the machine work done.
I should have maybe 2-3 left over when I get through when I'm done depending on if I can talk my brother into doing this for himself.
These will be professional centrifuges, not for the faint of heart as they are variable speed, electric braking (for stopping) locked down lid etc, And they are heavy, about 360 lbs each so the shipping will have to go Freight line with a liftgate at the drop off point.
They have casters to roll around the shop if need be.
If interested in one of these and can wait about 1 month, let me know.
I will also have fully tested them before shipping.
Also to protect Buuuds interest, I will send him payment for a set of plans for each one that sells, Auction winner etc. (If that is OK with you Buuud)
I'm new to the forum, but always been a tinkerer with this type of thing.[/QUOTE
 
Registered: February 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Chariotdriver:
I too am working on a centrifuge using Buuds plans and have come into a source of centrifuges that will work for what we need when I get the machine work done.
I should have maybe 2-3 left over when I get through when I'm done depending on if I can talk my brother into doing this for himself.
These will be professional centrifuges, not for the faint of heart as they are variable speed, electric braking (for stopping) locked down lid etc, And they are heavy, about 360 lbs each so the shipping will have to go Freight line with a liftgate at the drop off point.
They have casters to roll around the shop if need be.
If interested in one of these and can wait about 1 month, let me know.
I will also have fully tested them before shipping.
Also to protect Buuuds interest, I will send him payment for a set of plans for each one that sells, Auction winner etc. (If that is OK with you Buuud)
I'm new to the forum, but always been a tinkerer with this type of thing.


let us know how much you will be selling a completed unit. I'm interested in this.


Jojo
 
Location: KTown - Itch Capital of the World | Registered: June 04, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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About the Rotor,

The main reasons that I built my rotor from a solid block of aluminum is (1), it is easy to machine. (2)it is light in weight. Mine only weighs about 2 1/2 lbs. and (3) is there are no seams to weld up or to seal. (4) is what I think is the most important, there is a lesser chance of having a balance problem.

I have another centrifuge in my head that I'm gathering stuff for that will be basicly the same design except it will be similar to the one shown in the plans as figure 6. The spindle will be much larger and the rotor will be made of steel built this way.

The rotor diameter will be the same, the rotor depth will the same, but the rotor speed will be increased somewhat and that will increase the volumn it can produce because the G's will be much higher.

I plan to build the rotor this way. Start with a pipe the diameter of the rotor with pipe walls at least 1/2" thick. Cut out 2 washer for the top and bottomthe infeed hole on top will be 4" in diameter and the hole in the bottom will be whatever size I need for the center hub. Then I will take all of the peices line them all up and weld them together. Up until now the only machining that will be done is just to true up the edges of the top and bottom to make them easier to line up before welding. All of the welding will be done on the outside of the rotor as to insure that the inside is smooth without any rough weld to hinder the flow of oil. I will machine a chamfer on the bottom washer and the bottom of the hub to insure a good weld to secure the hub solidly to the bottom. Anytime you weld on anything it will destort as the weld cools and draws, so I'm going to go at the welding like I was killing snakes and then let all of the shrinking and drawing go about its business until it is all cool, probably let it cool over nite.

Machining-- I will chuck the top in the lathe so as to true up the bottom by facing it true and machining the outer wall true, because I will next turn the rotor around and chuck the bottom in the lathe. From here I won't remove the rotor from the lathe until the rotor is completely finished. Next I will bore the hub to fit the spindle so as to have a true center hole to be able to use a center for support while doing the final machining. First I will machine the hub on the outer side of the hub to help lessen the weight. Next with an end boring bar I will make the bottom true and thin it down as much as I think I can safely get by with. Then with another boring bar I will thin the rotor inter wall and make it true. Now this is the hard part. I will have to take at least one cut or more to the inside of the top to be sure the inside of the top is true and also true the inside of the top and round the inside edge slightly. Then to the outside. I'll machine all surfaces true and machine the weld on the under side of the top, just enough to make it relatively smooth.

After all of the machining is done and all surfaces are true, the bottom should not less than 1/4" thick, the rotor walls not less than 3/16" and the top not less than 5/32".

Now comes the acid test. With the center in place in the hub bore hole, I will speed the lathe up as fast as it will turn and feel for any vibration. Finding none, I'll put it on the spindle for a second test, and if it still runs without vibration, then I'm home free. However if there is a vibration, then I'll have the find a machine shop to have it balanced as that is something that I don't have the equipment to do.

Give all ya'll something to think about????????

That's the way I'm going to do it here in the West.

Buuuuud
 
Location: Morton, Wash. USA | Registered: February 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Jojo,
And any others interested in Buying one from me.
Stay tuned, or let me know by PM that you are interested.
Working on it.
Regards,
Phil
 
Registered: August 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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sounds like a plan Buuuud. I would advise against welding in a hurry you will twist it. Tack it all together solidly, then weld about and inch or so then go to opposite side and duplicate, continue until done. I can't tell you how many jobs Ive seen twisted due to rushing. I think no matter what you do , if you start with that heavy of a piece of metal your going to need to have it balanced. Im in the process of looking for some 10" or 12" 6061 aluminum sched 40 pipe , might be a better route. If you can source any let me know, I'll be in touch.

Has anyone given any thought to converting a small medical centrifuge???? Seems we would just have to build a rotor...perhaps 8 inch, but runs at fairly high rrpm in a small package. Any input?
 
Registered: October 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Another technical question from the not so technical.

What temp does the centrifuge come to at max speed? The reason I am wondering is I have been reading about the cold filtering of oil in order to take out the large chunks but also the solid bits of oil.

I am wondering if this heats up and will allow the solid bits of oil over the lip and into the finished product where it can resolidify and cause problems downstream?

Thanks,
David
 
Location: Atlanta, GA | Registered: July 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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the centrifuge has no provided heat source, like an electric heater.

I imagine there would be minor heat transfer from the electric motor and friction of bearings but not much else in the way of adding btu's.

It is suggested to pre screen the oil. (example thru a window screen).

preheat the oil. how much? I would think between 100-140 degees F. anymore and you might get burned.

reason: it would be painfully slow if possible at all to drive contaminents thru 200 weight viscosity oil versus having them fall readily thru 2 W viscosity heated oil. (random illustration numbers)

The general function of the centrifuge is to remove heavier than oil particles which includes water.

The cold filtering you are referring to, as I understand it, is attempting to seperate the animal fats from vegetable fats. Both run fine in your engine just one takes more btu's to liquify.

If you are trying to avoid this, Dana Linscott has a good post or three... about pumping the oil out of the middle of the barrel. If you avoid both the floating top and the sunken bottom you'll get only the best oil from the middle.

This "best oil" from the middle will still have a gel-point that pretty much is, what is, for that barrel of oil. Even if you made biodiesel out of it, the gel-point would still be reflected in the final product.

hope this helps more than it hinders.


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
 
Location: iowa | Registered: December 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Whats goin on with the rotor IM6???
 
Registered: October 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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its the holiday weekend so I imagine nothing...

dropped the new size o-rings off friday morning and will talk to the machinist tuesday when he opens... hopefully will have something then or wednesday.


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
 
Location: iowa | Registered: December 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Originally posted by jeepin, moggin Jessup (coachgeo):
quote:
Originally posted by priespa1:
Buuud,
The partially liquid filled thingie wouldn't work on the tractor because of gravity drawing the fluid towards the ground as the speed was too slow to equally distribute the fluid around the wheel....
Bud just look up "Equal" or "automatic tire balancer" to get an explanation of how and why it works even on a verticle oriented tire.


It would work on a vehicle oriented tire, if the tire is spun fast enogh. It's a question of the G force distributing the balancing media right...
quote:

quote:
The question is a bit moot though, as the oil in the centrifuge would do the same job, helping out to balance the rotor.
If this was true then why would we be having this conversation about balancing the rotor? I do mean this as a technical question.


I wrote "help balancing the rotor"... The amount of oil in the rotor will not be enough to fully balance it, thus the need for having it close to balance from the beginning.
It works off the same principle as the beads or liquid balancing media in a vehicle tire, just as you pointed out your self... Wink

Paul
 
Location: Malmo, Sweden | Registered: June 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just finished cleaning the yak again from my main settling barrel and man, do I want a centrifuge.

Question; alot of you guys have the plans now, but I haven't seen any posts of anyone actually using it besides Buuuuud out in the West. Anyone else have one in use yet?
 
Location: The West Coast | Registered: March 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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many trying I suspect...

I got told today instead of "its all ready" that I should instead go pi$$ up a rope and maybe come back friday because a real "bread and butter" customer showed-up. Big Grin

I'd hold it against the machine shop since I was first in-line... but??? well the other guy pays better and often...lol I am the fill-in work. BUT I keep hope'n...


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
 
Location: iowa | Registered: December 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well, since I work for a service co, I know how that goes. Big corporate accounts pay our bills so they get preferential treatment.

I do have a few machine shop customers tho, 2 of which are barely making ends meet. Hmmm, might be a good time to hit them up. I had originally penciled out ideas for several prototype centrifuges (plate and spinning drum), but Buuuuud's plans take the trial and error aspect out of it. Getting anxious to hear how well it works for different people with different oil sources. Can't really beat the price for his plans tho, even if I do end up going with a different design.
 
Location: The West Coast | Registered: March 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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OK Buuud, received the plans and looked them over. LOVE the idea. Have a fab shop working on the rotor and other parts. Looks like it will work great. Many thanks!
 
Location: Michigan | Registered: August 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Balancing a big rotor:
1) place two saw horses parallel to each other, close enough to rest the shaft of the rotor across.
2) on top of each sawhorse, place a level
3) adjust by shimming (or whatever) until the two levels are precisely mid-bubble level
4) rest the rotor on the levels - they're smoother and flatter than most saw horses and let the rotor turn easily.
5) add weights to the light side (it'll be upper most) until there's no obvious light side anymore. Weights need to be really really well fastened to the rotor - welding is recommended, but JB-weld epoxy might work as well. In fact, JB-weld might be ideal, if it's got clean bare roughed up metal to stick to - make a dike of masking tape, spread a thick layer of JB weld into it, let harden, then sand off the excess.

This will balance to within about a 1 gram at 6 inches. That's just enough out of balance to feel a slight shimmy at 3600 rpm, which should be good enough for most purposes.
 
Location: Moses Lake, WA, USA | Registered: August 15, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Check out these products, 2 different small centrifuges designed for oil filtration that are available already, and say they can filter to 0.1 micron, spin at 7000 rpm and cost only $250-500.

http://www.dieselproducts.com/spinner/sp_works.html

http://www.dieselcraft.com/productinfo_OC_1.html

Seems like these would be an easy way to go, has anyone tried one?


YVORMV - Your veg. oil results may vary, see www.burnveg.com/forum
95 Dodge Cummins 4x4
Zero fossil house- 100% solar power and heat.
 
Location: N. Colorado | Registered: August 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by SunWizard:
Check out these products, 2 different small centrifuges ...Seems like these would be an easy way to go, has anyone tried one?
Do a search in here. Both have been discussed a good bit if I'm not mistaken.

Also remember. These operate off of fuel or oil pressure. Pressure created from a pump driven by a 4 to 12 piston diesel engine. There for to use them for our purpose you have to buy a high pressure pump to push the oil at huge gals/min. Such pumps alone will cost $200 to $500

Now for over the road filtering hmmmmm? Say put a 12v fuel pump(s) on your engine for feeding fuel and use your OEM lift pump for continual pushing HOT HEATED oil (to lower viscosity) thru this thing to clean your oil. hmmmmm. Might have to do a search again on the spinner II hmmmmm.


_________________________
If you believe you can't YOUR RIGHT;

But equally so.... if you believe you can, YOUR RIGHT as well.
 
Location: North Tx | Registered: November 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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