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The Spinner Centrifuge Plans: Review

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September 19, 2006, 05:43 AM
MrkiMedo
The Spinner Centrifuge Plans: Review
Regarding the safety, it seems to me that it would be a good idea to be in another room while centrifuge is spinning, if that's possible.


MB w124 300TD, 1992, single tank Elsbett kit.
September 19, 2006, 09:32 AM
Buuuuud
To all who are concerned about safty in the operation of a centrifuge.

You can control you own safty as you desire, by your construction of the machine and the way you operate it. Accidents happen and are going to continue to happen. Should you be concerned about a centrifuge causing any problem, you should NOT have one. It's a very simple solution, but I'm sure glad that Henry Ford wasn't afraid of running into a stump.

Not anticipating any stump here in the West, either.

Buuuuud

PS. For those sceptics, please be sure that your recliner seat belt is fastened at all times while watching TV.
September 19, 2006, 10:44 AM
im6under
quote:
PS. For those sceptics, please be sure that your recliner seat belt is fastened at all times while watching TV.

equally, proper restraints should be used in the throne room. Big Grin

back to the centrifuge:

Personally I would consider, but not really worry about a safety issue with bud's design. As drawn, it appears to me you could have the thing so far out of balance it would walk from spokane to new york city and back, destroying the motor many times over before stressing the rotor enough to grenade it.

could it happen? sure, but how many refuse to mow lawns or methodically avoid ever whacking the occaisional rock or pine cone for fear of a blade slamming thru the deck and killing them?

how many are afraid to look under a hood with the engine running? (fan blade or water pump could go)

My concern was for those modifying the original plans. Which can be done... but then it becomes your responsibility for the design parameters.

Balsa wood and duct tape designs excluded everyone else feel reasonably safe and if modifying keep the radius small. Someone was talking about a 24" truck wheel rotor??? *yikes* make sure you are in your fox hole when you plug it in.


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
September 19, 2006, 11:33 AM
JOAT
Anything spinning is at risk of self destruction. An enclosure that can contain the fragments if it does is essential. Doesn't matter if you use a custom drum, a brake drum, or the liberty bell, make sure there is something around it strong enough for the operating RPM.

If you want to worry about things flying apart, there is 50 to 100 lbs of flywheel or torque coverter spinning next to your leg every time you rev your engine. I've seen those fly apart too, at several thousand RPM. Surprisingly, the bell housing and sheet metal stopped the debris (barely). I did see a fan blade make it through an old dodge hood once tho...
September 30, 2006, 06:53 PM
Dougie
Buuuud,

Very interested after reading about your Centrifuge. As with most people I have been looking for a better way to filter WVO.

Has anyone built from your plans yet and what is the current method to order and pay for a set.
October 01, 2006, 01:21 AM
Buuuuud
Dougie,

I don't know for sure if anyone has completed a centrifuge from my plans yet, but I know there are some folks working on them.

You can order plans by PayPal through my e-mail or by snail mail, with International money order.

Thanks for your interest, from here in the West.

Buuuuud

PS. As soon as I get some of my Rat killing done, I plan to write up some more info on building the rotor. Gota get my ducks in a row first and get my head around it.
October 06, 2006, 01:25 PM
im6under
check your p.m.'s bud... thanks


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
October 06, 2006, 04:22 PM
Buuuuud
im6under,

Thanks so much for your thoughts. I think I'll ponder on it some and maybe send it to you for publication. How about that?

TO ALL THAT ARE FABRICATING THE CENTRIFUGE ROTOR

Should you be machining your rotor from a solid piece of aluminum, I don't think this would apply as you will have machined surfaces true to the center bore.

When fabricating a rotor, from pipe and flat plate, welding it together, balancing it, then mounting it to you spindle shaft and it runs smooth as silk, does not mean it is balanced and safe to operate.

I don't really know how to explain it so I may have to just ramble, but this problem has already occured, so I know it can happened.

I was thrilled that the builder called me so we could find a solution. Everything was as I said above. When the rotor was installed it ran very smooth and as soon as the oil was introduced into the rotor, the machine went dancing across the floor. The rotor was made perfect exept the inside of the rotor was not machined true with the center spindle bore. It was not out of round very much ( about .030 to .040 ) which doesn't seem like much to most folks, but when the weight of the oil fills that void, it adds that oil weight to one side of the rotor making a built in imbalance that is caused by the oil itself. When the oil is spinning in the rotor, it centers itself to the center bore of the rotor and if the inter wall of the rotor isn't true to the center bore, then you have more oil on one side of the rotor than the other. Everything weighs something, ( even me, I have to stick my arms out so folks can see if I'm walking or rolling ) and it doesn't take much weight to upset thing when they are spinning at 3450 rpm's.

I guess the main point the I want to make is the importance of having the inside of the rotor machined true to the center bore to make your centrifuge run smooth, true, do the job it is intended to do and most of all be SAFE.

How's that for ramblings, from here in the West.

Buuuuud
October 06, 2006, 05:19 PM
im6under
quote:
Thanks so much for your thoughts. I think I'll ponder on it some and maybe send it to you for publication. How about that?

sounds fine bud... and I don't mind helping out if I can. not a problem Smile


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
October 06, 2006, 10:47 PM
Buuuuud
OH, thought some of you folks would like to know, I change my WVO fuel filter yesterday for the first time after 14,321 miles on centrifuged oil. A little of that mileage was on dino diesel to start and purge only.

That's how long the filter lasted, here in the West.

Buuuuud
October 07, 2006, 12:42 AM
Dougie
Buuuud,

What sort of filter are you using, is it heated or is the oil heated before the filter?

Doug
October 07, 2006, 10:44 AM
Buuuuud
Dougie,

The filter is a NAPA fuel filter, 8 microns I think, and it is heated with a water jacket all the way around and runs about 170 degrees most of the time. The water comes from the thermostate housing to the fuel filter jacket then to the heat exchanger in the WVO tank then back to the heater return line. All of the fuel lines to and from the WVO tank are HIH. I did not buy a kit, I built it all from scratch, even the filter water jacket.

That's the way I did it, here in the West.

Buuuuud
October 07, 2006, 11:06 AM
kell
What did you use for a water jacket?
October 07, 2006, 12:44 PM
Buuuuud
kell,

I used a peice of 5" exhaust tubing for the outside and 4" tubing on the inside, spaced the two evenly apart with key stock. To seal the ends, used a tubing bender and bent a ring of copper tubing and silver soldered it all together, brass would also work, put in water hose fittings, silver soldered in the right places, silver soldered a couple of ears on each side to bolt it to the filter base, tested for leaks, and it was finished.

I made the jacket short enough to get a filter wrench on the bottom end for servicing, which I haven't had to do so very often.

That's the way it works, here in the West

Buuuuud
October 08, 2006, 03:50 AM
Dougie
Buuuuuuuuud

Would you be able to supply the Part Number please.


Doug
October 08, 2006, 10:08 AM
Buuuuud
Dougie

Sorry there are no part numbers as I manufactured it all myself. As far as I know there is no other like in available.

Maybe someone else knows of one available commercially.

That's all I can say, from here in the West.

Buuuuud
October 08, 2006, 11:57 AM
jeepin, moggin Jessup (coachgeo)
quote:
Originally posted by Buuuuud:
Dougie

Sorry there are no part numbers....Buuuuud
Im guessing he means the napa filter not your jacket


_________________________
If you believe you can't YOUR RIGHT;

But equally so.... if you believe you can, YOUR RIGHT as well.
October 08, 2006, 01:42 PM
Buuuuud
coachgeo,

By george George, I beleive you are right again.

Sorry about that Dougie. The NAPA filter number is 3281 and hold about a quart of fuel.

That's what is called, head in posterior, here in the West.
October 09, 2006, 04:26 AM
Dougie
BuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuD,

No problems with the filter element and VO? I have had had problems with the element material expanding and blocking the fliter.

Yes sorry I did mean the filter HAHAHA

Doug
October 09, 2006, 10:28 AM
Buuuuud
Dougie,

I have been real happy with the service of that filter. As I said, I think the micron value is 8, but am not sure. I have to go to the village today to replace the one I changed so will re-check the micron value.

On the water jacket for the filter, I used 5" tubing on the outside and I thought it was 4" on the inside, but when I went back and checked the size, I found it to be an odd size, so it must have been a peice of thin wall drive shaft tubing.

As you age, your memory is the second thing to go so I have to keep checking on myself.

Can't even remember what I had for breakfast sometimes, here in the West.

Buuuuud