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The Spinner Centrifuge Plans: Review

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July 30, 2006, 12:54 PM
im6under
The Spinner Centrifuge Plans: Review
The Spinner Centrifuge Plans: Review

Saturday morning had 2 unexpected surprises for me. The first was the postman pounding on my door because I had a special delivery envelope. These make me nervous when I’m not expecting anything. The second was opening the envelope and finding a set of plans explaining how to build and operate a centrifuge designed by Bud.

I’m going to forgo chronological order for a minute and say the plans are “FANTASTIC and you need a set” before you get bored reading and leave with a wrong impression. Bud owns and operates a homebuilt centrifuge that cleans oil in a single pass. It is scalable to both volume and how well you want the oil cleaned. It can clean it to 5 microns or 10 or 1 micron or to .01 microns if this is what you want. It’s cheap simple and easy to build and I’ll have one before the end of August.

quote:
You can order through PayPal or with credit card through PayPal and the account number is my e-mail which is posted on my profile. We also take checks money orders or cash, if you have picture ID. Yuk Yuk. US price = $27.50, Canada = $28.50. E-mail is spikee@lewiscounty.com

Snail mail

Bud Pitts
5162 Hwy. 508
Morton, Wash. 98356

Thanks for your interest.

Buuuuud


When I first opened the envelope and pulled out the folder containing the 12 page plans I wasn’t ready to read through them but I did quickly scan through them. The first six pages are text and it didn’t seem very technical. I was a little disappointed so I flipped to the back six pages full of the meat and potatoes drawings. I glanced at them and wasn’t all that impressed either. I tossed it on the kitchen table and would get back to it later.

Later that afternoon I sat and read the plans word for word and looked at the drawings. I understood the basic concept but thought Bud only had it about half right. I still wasn’t impressed. The drawings were overly simplified and some of the stuff didn’t make sense, as in, why is this done this way? Why is this piece shaped like that or overlapping this piece? I could picture how easy it would be to build but it needed a lot of cleaning up to “look” professional. Thinking to myself “I’d change this, this, and this if I built one.” I tossed the plans back on the table.

Last night I read the plans again for the second time cover to cover. The first thing that popped in my head was the writing isn’t very technical, but truthfully it isn’t supposed to be. It is supposed to be informative and communicate an idea. It does and because it is written in very plain English it is actually quite easy to understand. I was being overly critical earlier because I thought it “should” be hard. It isn’t hard and this is part of the genius.

I flipped back to the drawings again: Three overview drawings and three detail drawings of components. I sat looking at each drawing and visualized building and operating the centrifuge.

Why are these pieces over lapping?
Check the text and drawings and overview. “Ohhh, no seal needed doing it this way.”

Why are these pieces over-lapping?
Check the plans again… “Ohhhhh, so the oil is retained at high load.”

Why is this piece this tall???
Check the plans again… “Ohhhh, because it keeps cross contamination from happening on shut-down.

I scrutinized Bud’s plans front to rear, top to bottom, and can only say Bud has a working home built centrifuge that cleans his oil with no mess, fancy wording, or expensive materials. And it obviously works quite well.

Bud personally cleans 5 gallons at a time with his centrifuge, but his little do-jigger will also continuously clean 55 gallon drums, 275 gallon totes, or an endless stream of oil in a “SINGLE” pass. The only limiting factor is how big your storage is.

Once you get the basic concept of his key pieces it can all be scaled up or down to suit your own personal tastes. It is adaptable and cheap. It will work with a ½ h.p. motor or a ten h.p. motor. You could even get cute and power it with an svo diesel engine if you wanted.

I’m still a little disappointed…

I should have thought of this myself.

It is definitely right up there with sliced bread and all the other great ideas because… it is so simple you feel silly. Also like all the other great ideas it is a trick that isn’t much of a trick at all… once you know the secret that is.

Bud quotes $50.00 for material plus the motor and machine time and incidental plumbing. Basically you can toss this thing together out of scrap for free or maybe $300 with all brand new shiney materials and a coat of paint.

You don’t have to own your own lathe to take advantage of this. Any machine shop should be able to fabricate the pieces in short order.

Congratulations Bud, I hope a lot of people take advantage of your plans. I know I will and best of all they aren’t carved in stone… easily scaleable is a plus for everyone involved. Thanks.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: im6under,


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
July 30, 2006, 02:10 PM
jeepin, moggin Jessup (coachgeo)
Well Budd so far has limited sending his plans to a select few for review I guess. Look forward to when he releases them for the rest of us. I'm assuming though his intent is to make them available for sale and not public domain.

Either way I look forward to their release. Been stalling to builing my new filter setup cause I just felt something like this was around the corner.

Budd if you want a hands on review of building one Im game.

Thanks for your time and efforts Budd and 6Under.


_________________________
If you believe you can't YOUR RIGHT;

But equally so.... if you believe you can, YOUR RIGHT as well.
July 30, 2006, 03:59 PM
im6under
how to get a set of plans?
bud says:
"Well guys here it is.
Had the drawing for the complimentary plans and they were mailed out Wednesday afternoon and the winner should get them in a few days.

If anyone want to order a set of plans for the centrifuge, they are ready to mail.

Prices listed are all US funds only, and includes S/H. USA $27.50, Canada $28.50, Austrailia and New Zealand $31.50, United Kingdom $31.00. The difference prices are for the veried mailing costs.

The plans include instructions and operations, drawing and photograph. My phone number is also there in case you have question or would just like to BS. If you call just to BS, I'll feed you a line that could choak a dog, as I'm very good in the BS department.

If you would like to hear the feed back from the guy that got complimentary plans before you order any for yourself, that would OK as I don't want anyone to buy anything that they don't want or feel they can't use.

We are not set up for paypal or credit cards so we will have to work with the Postal Department. Money orders are best and prefered, but checks will work.

Send orders to

Bud Pitts
5162 Hwy. 508
Morton, Wa. USA
98356"


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
July 31, 2006, 12:44 AM
Buuuuud
im6under

Thank you so much for the GLOWING POSITIVE review on the centrifuge plans. I'm sorry that I didn't make them more technical but that's not the way I am. Im just a simple guy and I write the way I talk, ( my wife says, mouth open and running all the time ). Mostly I'm thrilled that you plan to have your centrifuge in operation by the end of August, and I hope you have as much fun as I have had building and operating my own machine.

Thank you for reposting the ordering info on this thread.

Good luck and enjoy.

That's what we enjoy, here in the West

Buuuuud
July 31, 2006, 01:16 AM
im6under
A couple of questions from the other-side
correct me if I'm wrong on anything here...

quote:

does it indicate how large a chuck of crud it can handle?
How long does a single batch take to process?


The largest chunk of crud it could handle is potentially 3/32". This said I suppose you could change a specification to handle larger debris but then you'd have to clean it more often also. Straining to 200 microns has never been a problem for me so I planned on this size pre-screening regardless of machine capability.

something else "NO" disassembly required for cleaning. Some centrifuges are like pulling engines to change spark plugs... not this one. It's easily cleaned immediately after shut-down.

In bud's present configuration he cleans 5 gallons in about 2 1/2 hours with 1300G's of force.

It's difficult to not just tell you what he did to make this gizmo, it really is that simple but I am honor bound to not ruin sales for him.

The most important thing about Bud's gizmo is the concept. The exact specifications are infinately variable. Meaning, once you see what he did, you can build one just like it or tear off in a different direction different parts and get the same thing done.

like a sucker tank??? you don't have to use a 30 gallon water tank. it could be a 5, 50, or hundred gallon water, propane, or air tank. however you do it... it is a sucker.

Bud's invention is like that, build right off the plans... or make it bigger, smaller, three legs or four??? 5 gallons in 2 hours or ten gallons every 30 minutes 1300g's or 2500g's ??? when you're all done you'll have a centrifuge that works.

To me its the simplicity that is the elegance. Your paying for an education that can take you alot farther than just the line drawings.

I don't think anyone will feel cheated by these plans... but alot will say... ohhhh is that all??? well I coulda done that.

yeah but you didn't... and now you know how to... and cheaply also... Big Grin


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
July 31, 2006, 04:54 PM
darkmoebius
A simple question for Bud or im6under,

How big is 5 gallon centrifuge? Is it something you can use in a backyard in a normal suburb or is it something for those who have more land or a barn?
July 31, 2006, 10:57 PM
patcarr
i'm don't understand how the centrifuge works with a continueous flow. i understand the dynamics of spinning and have seen centrifuges for labs with test tubes.

i found this web page, but still don't understand.

idp centrifuge

this seems to be small and functional. i've ordered literature.

can anyone point me to how the particles/water are taken out of the centrifuge and how the clean oil exits?

thanks
pat
July 31, 2006, 11:16 PM
dreadhed
Could this be used on WMO?
August 01, 2006, 12:32 AM
darkmoebius
quote:
Originally posted by patcarr:
i'm don't understand how the centrifuge works with a continueous flow.
Actually, the Spin-Clean and Spinner II at the IDP link you provided require continuous oil in order to function at all. Unlike most lab and other common centrifuges which use electric motors to spin their turning elements, the Spin-Clean and Spinner II are turned by the hydraulic pressure oil the engines oil pump. As long as oil is being pushed in the line, the rotor spins.







My very uneducated guess at how they work has been deleted because I discovered it was jest that - uneducated.
August 01, 2006, 12:46 AM
Buuuuud
in6under

Thanks for the good words about the centrifuge, but I didn't invent it as they have been around for a long time. Actually the only thing that I did was apply the centrifuge to clean WVO and make it a continuous cleaning process. Is yours about ready to go into operation?

darkmoebius

About the size, Mine is about 30" high, and has a stand attached for a 5 gallon bucket above that for the dirty oil supply and requires 3X3' of floor space. It weighs about 70 or 80 lbs. and most of that is the electric motor.

patcarr

The basic way that it works. The oil is fed in at an even rate, spins around inside the rotor where the contaminants are forced to the outside and the good stuff comes out over the top. It is all explained in the plans.

dreadhed

I assume you are refering to oil like used engine lube oil.

So far the only testing that I have done on engine oil is for WVO contamination in the lube oil, and on my Datsun pickup there doesn't seem to be any. I plan to do some engine lube oil soon just to see what the quality of the centrifuged oil. I think I will send samples to an oil testing lab in Colorado for the final results. They are in the business of testing oil and I have had them do some for me before and have been quite satisfied. But I don't think there is any reason why it should not do a good job on used engine oil. If you want a really good job of cleaning, all the is necessary is to slow down the infeed rate. I have run some WVO through the second time and you wouldn't believe how clean it comes out.

That's all I know, here in the West.

Buuuuud
August 01, 2006, 12:49 AM
jeepin, moggin Jessup (coachgeo)
quote:
Originally posted by patcarr:
i'm don't understand how the centrifuge works...
pat
The cruddy oil and its crud is heavy. when you spin it the heavy crud stays at the bottom and the cleaner stuff begins to climb the outer wall due to "G"forces. You know like that carnival ride where they strap a bunch of you to basically a verticle skate board. Then they spin the whole contraption and you all roll upward a few feet (max the thing allows). Then they drop the floor just the scare the crap out of ya. Welll.... that's how it works. The lighter oil climbs the walls and spills over the edge of the inner spinning bowl. (or something along those lines) This spilled out portion collects in the non spilling bowl. This non spinning bowl has an open valve that allows the good oil to drain out into whatever you want it to go into.


_________________________
If you believe you can't YOUR RIGHT;

But equally so.... if you believe you can, YOUR RIGHT as well.
August 01, 2006, 01:20 AM
darkmoebius
Thanks for the explanation Jeepin, I now get it.

I know a similar process is used to seperate oil from water. Any ideas how that is done?
August 01, 2006, 03:55 AM
wvoalaska
Buuuuud,

You may have addressed these questions in one of the other threads, but if you did, I missed it.

Does your centrifuge separate the water out also? Have you tested the oil to make sure it's completely dewatered?

I'm very interested.

Also, for the parts that do have to be machined, have you given any thought to just manufacturing them and sending them along with your plans? I like to do things myself, but I don't have any metalworking tools.

Thanks.


Two tank system on an '89 F250
Working on an 81 Chevy Chevette
Attempting to resurrect a rusted out 85 Ford Tempo
August 01, 2006, 09:50 AM
im6under
quote:
in6under

Thanks for the good words about the centrifuge, but I didn't invent it as they have been around for a long time. Actually the only thing that I did was apply the centrifuge to clean WVO and make it a continuous cleaning process. Is yours about ready to go into operation?


you didn't invent the centrifuge... but the sealess continous process is a bit unique.


Is mine ready to go??? no I won't have access to a big enough lathe until aug 14th and am waiting on a motor to arrive currently... should have it finished by the 18th though.


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
August 01, 2006, 10:19 AM
im6under
quote:
Does your centrifuge separate the water out also? Have you tested the oil to make sure it's completely dewatered?

the plans state it will remove emulsified water but you should check for water after cleaning and if any is found your feed rate of oil is too high.

trying to explain this in simplified terms.

for a given size centrifuge, the longer the oil is spinning the cleaner it will be. example: with a feedrate of 10 gallons per hour, little cleaning will take place. with a feed rate of .5 gallons per hour alot of cleaning will take place.

to increase the feed rate and maintain the same cleanliness of the oil the machine would need to be scaled up accordingly to the amount per hour of oil you wanted to process.

as noted in the plans the described size centrifuge will clean 5 gallons of screened wvo in about two hours, to a very high degree of cleanliness.

In theory, if your oil were already dry, and you only needed the oil cleaned to five microns you could increase the infeed setting getting more oil filtered per hour.

to get the emusified water out and more oil per hour you'd have to scale the system up in size accordingly. This would not be hard to do. Granted there are reasonable limits, as the larger the rotor, the bigger the lathe has to be and the harder it would be to balance and now you need a bigger motor, ect...

basically this is a very good cheap answer to centrifuging at home, for the enthusiast that wants to handle a 100 gallons a week, if you want to do thousands of gallons a week in a commercial operation then there are other alternatives.

I ramble alot... Big Grin


Though your argument is very clever, I don't think it will lead to the results you desire. gandhi
August 01, 2006, 11:39 AM
RideANeversummer
I'm kindoff new to WVO, and I am just wondering if the centrifuge will remove suspended microdroplets? From what i've read these seam to be a big problem and can cause damage to the IP.

Thanks, It sounds like a good thing.
August 01, 2006, 11:54 AM
Buuuuud
im6under

I know now that the right guy won the draw on the centrifuge plan as you understand where the rabbit did it in the cabbage patch. You are very correct on the feed rate with this particular size machine, however you could use the same size rotor and feed a lot more oil and get it just as clean. Using the style shown in fig. 6, it would be possible to increase the "G"s by increasing the spindle speed. But with all things there is a limit. If the speed was increased, the spindle size should be increased also as something that is turning that fast, you sure don't want it come unglued, unscrewed or apart at the seams.

As you said, if the rotor size is increased, you there is greater problem in balancing the rotor. With my machine, running it 24/7 it could produce 40 to 50 gallons every 24 hrs.

Thats my suggestion, from here in the West

Buuuuud
August 01, 2006, 03:07 PM
ZukiFrodo
Buuud, do your plans also show how to build and incorporate the continuous feed?
August 01, 2006, 04:36 PM
BMW Fan
Hi Buuuuud,

could you please check your email and PM ?

BMW Fan


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August 01, 2006, 11:03 PM
patcarr
quote:
Originally posted by jeepin, moggin Jessup (coachgeo):
quote:
Originally posted by patcarr:
i'm don't understand how the centrifuge works...
pat
The cruddy oil and its crud is heavy. when you spin it the heavy crud stays at the bottom and the cleaner stuff begins to climb the outer wall due to "G"forces. You know like that carnival ride where they strap a bunch of you to basically a verticle skate board. Then they spin the whole contraption and you all roll upward a few feet (max the thing allows). Then they drop the floor just the scare the crap out of ya. Welll.... that's how it works. The lighter oil climbs the walls and spills over the edge of the inner spinning bowl. (or something along those lines) This spilled out portion collects in the non spilling bowl. This non spinning bowl has an open valve that allows the good oil to drain out into whatever you want it to go into.


now i understand the basics. i can visualize how the clean stuff comes off the top. how does the dirty stuff and water get off the bottom?

thanks
pat