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Looped return and water seperation
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Wondering if anyone has specs on this question:

Water seperating filters like my Racor are designed to do their job with a certain amount of flow. Is it possible that by looping the fuel return in after the filter, the filter will not have sufficient flow to do its job? I would be more afraid of too much flow than too little, but maybe there is a midpoint that is optimum.

Here is my bowl element after about 3000 veg miles. (10 micron). I drain it often and have never found too much water or other crap, but I settle my oil for a couple weeks and only pour carefully off the top...

2003 VW Jetta GLS TDI Wagon

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Location: Moretown, Vermont | Registered: March 23, 2003Report This Post
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I beleive that there are two differnt type of "water seperator" filters.

The first..like the type you show merely alow water to drop out by reducing the flow/tubulence of the fuel. IF the fuel is too viscouse this is of very limited effectivness. The slower the fuel passes through the more effective this type of filter is at allowing water to drop to the bottom. The particulates which accumulate in the bottom are normally stuff that has accumulated on teh filter element and then dropped off and fallen to the bottom of the filter once the flow was stopped completely when the engine was allowed to sit without running. Water resistive elements can make these type of separators more effective.

The second type of "water separator" is an "active separation" unit which uses cyclonic or other fluid dynamics to cause water to "clump together" which might otherwise simply be born along on the current of fuel and past the filter element. These larger drops of water then settle in current free points of the filter and are held much like in the first example. These type of separators require a staedy flow through at a set rate in order to function properly. And similar to teh first example these separators also require that the viscosityof the fuel be low enough to allow proper operation.

Remember...all of these filters were designed to filter DIESEL FUEL and cannot be relistically expected to separate water from vegoil fuel unless the vegoil can be made to nearly duplicate the physical properties of diesel fuel. This is nearly impossible though a "close enough" approximation may be acheived to allow a limited effectiveness via heating of the vegoil.

Dana
danalinscott@yahoo.com
http://danalinscott.netfirms.com/
 
Location: Central MN..Brrrrrr! | Registered: November 06, 2001Report This Post
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Another part of the water separation feature of a Racor, or other water removing elements, is the media is treated to make it hydrophobic. The idea is then the water will be chemically repelled by the media and won't be allowed to pass. Some water still gets through by either failures in the hydrophobicity or by "tagging along" chemically with the material moving through the media. This water wouldn't be of concern, though, since it is usually free water in the system that causes problems. I think a combination of the settling bowl concept and the treated media makes a pretty effective water separator. That, along with filtering efficiency, is why I recommend using the Racor filters. Just my opinion, though.

Keep everything as simple as possible, but no simpler

--Albert Einstein
 
Location: Southington, OH | Registered: January 24, 2003Report This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Habanero:
That, along with filtering efficiency, is why I recommend using the Racor filters. Just my opinion, though.

Keep everything as simple as possible, but no simpler

--Albert Einstein


Which of the Racor Filters separate out water and which of the Racor Filters are heated?
 
Location: Reelsville, Indiana | Registered: January 02, 2003Report This Post
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I think all the filters sold as diesel fuel filters have the aquabloc(tm) media. I also think almost all the spin-on series filter come with the heater option. Do realize, though, that the heater included isn't a super high-power heater; it is only intended to keep diesel from gelling. Go to http://www.parker.com/EAD/displayCatalog.asp?menu_parkerid=46&menu_gid=3&menu_divid=109&catid=155379&Products=changed for more information on the various models and options.

Keep everything as simple as possible, but no simpler

--Albert Einstein
 
Location: Southington, OH | Registered: January 24, 2003Report This Post
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Good info all... that is clarifying.

2003 VW Jetta GLS TDI Wagon
 
Location: Moretown, Vermont | Registered: March 23, 2003Report This Post



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realize, though, that the heater included isn't a super high-power heater; it is only intended to keep diesel from gelling


This is what I thought as well..but Greasel claims otherwise on at least some of the Racors they sell. Maybe they modify them.

Dana
danalinscott@yahoo.com
http://danalinscott.netfirms.com/
 
Location: Central MN..Brrrrrr! | Registered: November 06, 2001Report This Post
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Yeah, I saw that information on Greasel's site as well. The guys over on the pickup forums that are running Racor auxilliary filters don't seem to think the heaters get very warm. I don't have first hand experience, so I guess I should not say anything definitively.

Keep everything as simple as possible, but no simpler

--Albert Einstein
 
Location: Southington, OH | Registered: January 24, 2003Report This Post
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Talking of water seperators

Has anyone looked into agglomerators.
The type detailed at this link look interesting http://www.reading-college.ac.uk/marine/13bfuel.htm#bmn48

 
Location: UK | Registered: March 25, 2003Report This Post
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A small note about the heated Racor filter mystery...

I've got a RACOR 445 filter with heated bowl.

It's 200 watts. Draws max. 20amp 12VDC, so that's fine. So far so good.

Aye, here's the rub:

"The in-bowl heater is a cold weather starting aid with an INTERNAL AUTOMATIC THERMOSTAT that turns on the heater if the fuel temperature drops below 45deg F (7deg C)..."

"Heat is supplied (just enough) to melt the wax crystals and allow fuel to pass..."

"The heater will automatically turn off at about 75deg F (24deg C) ..."

My beef here is that this barely constitutes any sort of useful warming, especially for those of us in colder climates.

I have been in touch with Greasel and am waiting back to hear exactly how their Racor 600-series heater manages to pump out the fiery heat that they claim...

This is an achilles heel in an otherwise very high quality filter product, IMHO.
 
Location: Alberta, Canada | Registered: August 22, 2003Report This Post
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Oh yeah, thought I should add: in fairness, I haven't installed my Racor yet so I don't know how it well it actually performs.

I'm hoping Greasel will reveal their secret of how they coax so much heat of a reluctant heating assembly! Smile
 
Location: Alberta, Canada | Registered: August 22, 2003Report This Post
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Has anyone figured out how to rig the thermostat so that it could continue to heat past the 75* shutoff temp (or whatever the temp is)?

Perhaps by disengaging the termostat, and allowing the heater to run constantly?

Would this be a good thing if it was possible?


shawn collins
'85 jetta
coolant/electric heat, 2 micron racor 660 filter with fuel return looped into it, 6 port motorized solenoid, 17 gal veg tank. 30K and counting
 
Location: bellingham, wa, usa | Registered: February 18, 2004Report This Post



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I have tried this route.

The main problem seems to be that the plate heaters most often used do not seem to be very durable under constant load..and most are not replacable when they crap out. It is possible to disable the low temp thermostat on a few designs..and replace it with a different thermostat downstream of the filter...but again the cost of doing so to a new filter do not seem to be justified..and I rarely find used filters with heaters that still function.

This is why I was eventually forced to start from scratch with the heated goldenrod conversion.
 
Location: Central MN..Brrrrrr! | Registered: November 06, 2001Report This Post
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