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Just wanted to let people know my converted car is still running great.

How many years now, 5 ? 6 ? something like that.

I'm selling it soon. Along with the Raw Power centrifuge set up.. if you're near Edmonton, open to offers to take it away.

Mercedes 300D 1987 runs "better than new" because it's on Veggy.


Regards,
Scott
1987 Mercedes 300D - 2 tank VO
 
Location: Edmonton | Registered: April 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I kind of am sorrowful to hear this. You were my inspiration on my conversion I performed about 3-1/2 years back on my 87 Mercedes 300D. It has over 80,000 miles on the conversion, about 320,000 total miles on the car. I drive 100 miles a day.

I am just starting on another project, a 83 240D Mercedes 4 speed for my son.

Do you plan to replace it with another WVO vehicle?
 
Registered: November 09, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I too would like to let people know that my converted car is also running great, converted in 2006! and man, it is quiet on this board, used to be crazy...

I too may soon give up the grease, I simply don't do the kinda driving I used to do. I did recently have the opportunity to open my IP to change a leaky O-ring and was pleasantly surprised to see only slight staining of the inside was a golden hue. I'm also happy to report no oil usage between changes and no problems to speak of with regards to VO usage. Converted at 40k, now with 170K.

I attribute the "success" to good heat, good filtering, not to greedy to burn some diesel, long purge distance, not purge time. My purge is 30 seconds, but driving a few miles on diesel before shut down is what I mean. Never running cold oil in a cold engine, the kiss of coking death! Shorten oil change interval to 5k instead of 10k.


Merk
03 Jetta TDI 12 gal marine tank in trunk w/copper heat exchanger no intank connections, coolant heated copper coiled fuel filter, HIH, 10 plate FPHE & two 3 port wvodesign fuel valves. Timer/relay purge.
 
Location: Etna, NH | Registered: January 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Is there any way to encourage those "experts" that regularly used to post useful tips on this board to begin posting again? I have managed to contact a few and they are still experimenting and finding better ways to use fryer oil as fuel. They just don't post here anymore.
 
Registered: June 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If they're not posting here are they posting on other forums? It seems rather quiet on all the biodiesel and UVO fuel forums. None seem to have the activity there was years ago, and pump fuel is expensive as ever. Perhaps for many it was just a passing fad.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think your right about it being a fad for some of the "experts". But a few are still doing some pretty cool things you don't read about on any forum. Why?
 
Registered: June 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I'm sure things will change once the sock puppets are weeded out Cool


" I don't know what I don't know until I know"
1994 GMC 6.5 Tubo 2005 Dodge ram 3500, 3 VW's 2000, 2002, 2005.
 
Location: Manitoba Canada | Registered: March 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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What I have noticed is how hard it is getting to find oil supplies. In our area, one city is now demanding that the company that picks up the oil must not only be licensed (more city revenue), but must also clean the grease traps! I lost two suppliers to this and another is delaying the inevitable.
I have space for 3000 gallons, but I am now running "gallon in, gallon out"
Are these the good old days?
 
Registered: February 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Many people have a hard time finding oil and it becomes a discouragement. Also We are running out of vehicle to legally convert. All of those new Mercedes and VW can be converted but it is really expensive and usually you have to turn off the emissions controls. If you are really environmentally friendly you would get an electric car and just plug it in. Gas is only $3 per gallon. Driving an electric car 40 miles is less than $1.50. at least in my state.

I actually got rid of my CDI grease Mercedes sort of, I gave it to my brother who travels a lot since I now work 2.2 miles from home instead of 40. I still have my wife's CRD Jeep and we just took a grease trip to Washington DC and back bringing all of our own fuel with us.

It really sucks driving a gas powered car but it is paid for and I try not to drive to much. I am actually considering leasing an electric car because 40 miles a day in a gas car sucks. Ido total around town driving now.


Robert
In Fort Lauderdale running a 2006 Jeep Liberty CRD 2 veg tanks HOH 2 upgraded greasecar vavles 3/8 fuel line 5/8 heater line HOH Hose wrapped filter. Injector Line heater on the Common Rail. 2nd car 2005 Mercedes CDI, Raw Power fuel pump, 36 gallon veg tank in trunk coolant heated HOH, rubber hose wrapped fuel filter, FPHE, 3 greasecar valves, Common rail line heater.
 
Location: Ft Lauderdale, FL | Registered: June 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Many came to the conclusion that making biodiesel was better than running SVO. There have been many reported cases of people trashing engines with poorly designed or incorrectly operated SVO systems.
Biodiesel is much more 'forgiving' as a vehicle fuel.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Maybe this is why there are less people doing grease. Around here I have equipment from two different bio diesel people that did not want to do it anymore. I know two more that have quit. I know two svo folks that have quit also. There are 5-10 svo people that still come by and ask me for clean grease. Mine is filtered really well.

I made biodiesel back in 2000-2001. It is a pain. Today I can filter 60 gallons of grease in the hands on time it takes me to do a titration. I considered making a new processor and running both a few years back but the cost of setting up is greater than converting an 05-06 common rail diesel to two tank system. And eventually I would have to buy methanol and chemicals.


Robert
In Fort Lauderdale running a 2006 Jeep Liberty CRD 2 veg tanks HOH 2 upgraded greasecar vavles 3/8 fuel line 5/8 heater line HOH Hose wrapped filter. Injector Line heater on the Common Rail. 2nd car 2005 Mercedes CDI, Raw Power fuel pump, 36 gallon veg tank in trunk coolant heated HOH, rubber hose wrapped fuel filter, FPHE, 3 greasecar valves, Common rail line heater.
 
Location: Ft Lauderdale, FL | Registered: June 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You're in a climate that's very forgiving on SVO systems, and you can process UVO as needed year round. Most the SVO problems have been where it gets cold enough to snow.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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We had a good year so far this year, quite a few systems sold in Alberta and BC particularly, and certainly lots to where it gets good and cold.

Personally, I keep my oil settling in the cubies, then in a drum, at just above freezing, all winter, in a small shed. Then pump it through a 1 micron bag filter. That is it. I have been using that (Pump and Filter System) setup for about 3 years now, really like it. Easy as it gets. Grab the cubies from the restaurant, take home, stack, pour into drum through a mesh strainer.

I do pay about 25 cents per litre to my best sources. I actually gave away two sources this summer, one that was free oil, to a customer. I had too much oil coming in for the amount I drive (living 20 minutes from town and there just about every day, plus some long trips every few months, is typical).
By offering to pay something, I find that the restaurants are a lot more cooperative in straining the oil, to get the big bits out, and being neat about it, so the cardboard is easy to recycle, and the plastic cubies have only a little residue in them, so easy to recycle those as well.

I think the smaller towns and smaller restaurants are easier these days. My fuel is cheap, it's easy to process, and the system works well. (Just changed my fuel filter at 11 months and around 5000 km on the Audi 2.5 TDI Quattro, the winter car...did not drive it this past spring/summer). Even so, 5000 km, some storage months...once a year filter change...not bad!

I have friends traveling all over the Yukon right now, with truck and trailer, took all the oil they needed for the trip in the back of the truck. :-) Their other vehicle is a 2006 Golf TDI, (both are 2-tank). They got 20,000 km on the last filter element. They use the same collection/filtration setup that I do.

Drove a Mercedes 240D from BC to Ontario this summer, used absolutely no diesel, SingleTank, plugged one filter, no other engine/operational issues (ok the exhaust pipe broke on a bump right after I delivered it to the new owner, but at that was it).

Heard from a long time customer this year who ran a 2-tank 2003 TDI wagon through a few winters with lows to -40C.

So, it's all doable. There's a learning curve, for sure, but it's not that difficult, and as much as I would like to have one of our two TDI's replaced with one EV for local trips and one highway car or truck for longer trips, I cannot justify it. There's no way an EV can compete with a $4K Jetta that works great and probably has another 8 years or so to go before it'll finally be worn out!

People make it difficult on themselves sometimes. Overly complex filtration setups and conversions, lack of attention to system/vehicle maintenance, use of very poor quality WVO, etc.

I've always said it's like heating with wood, which we also do here. You have to sharpen the tools, tune up the saw, mix the gas, split the stuff, carry it..know how to make a fire, and clean the chimney once in a while. A bit of work (once you've learned what you need to know) for a lot of satisfaction and savings... but it's not for everyone.


Edward Beggs
PlantDrive(tm) International
plantdrive.ca@gmail.com
http://www.PlantDrive.ca
SVO Consultations; Component/Kit Supplier; SVO Conversions; since 1999.
 
Location: Salmon Arm, BC, Canada | Registered: November 23, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Most of my activity is through PM responding to questions.
The irony is i just responded to a PM associated with this site.


David Norwood

2001 F350 7.3 DI purchased new by me and it is the first DI experimented with and talked about on this forum.

Updated 1/2011 Alternative Fuel User Since 2003-vo is always in my fuel. Only one fuel tank. GPI/CIM-TEK spin on filterhead and 10 micron filter. Superchip. Hutch and Harpoon mods 2010. Diesel inline filter between tank and Airtex E2236 fuel pump (rated to 110 psi).Fuel pressure gauge. HOH for fuel line heat from tank to 12v lift pump. Two 12v 36" heaters, one before add on filter and one before OEM filter.

Cool weather mixes updated 2010. 100% vo to 70°. 66% to 35°. 50% to 10°.
 
Location: Upstate South Carolina , USA | Registered: December 28, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Edward Beggs: ... quite a few systems sold in Alberta and BC particularly, and certainly lots to where it gets good and cold. ...


Yup, Plantdrive is the only ready-made system I recommend to people who want a reliable cold weather SVO system. Good design, excellent customer support.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think a lot of the decline in the interest in Biofuels is the whole green save the planet bandwagon has run out of puff and the topic at cocktail parties has changed.
I used to get arseholes all the time lambasting me because I got into the veg fuels thing for cost savings and they thought that was wrong not to do it to save the environment.

I don't know of one, single solitary save the planet type from back when I started that is still doing veg fuel. Most of them, particularly the loud ones were lucky to do it for a couple of years! I have been in it 10 next month.
The only people I do know that go back are the ones that hafve always said they are in it for the money. Ironicaly the do gooders couldn't see the reason for using veg was irrelevant as both ideals actually served their own very well.

I'd sure like to catch up with a few of these upstarts that gave me grief before and give them a grilling over what they have been driving and doing for their all consumong environmental concerns they were so adamant about back then.

I think there have been more people bailing than coming onboard in recent years.
The trend has faded well and truly and people have lost the inclination to put in a bit of effort. That said I bet if we have another price jump in fuel like occoured around the time of the china Olympics when the veg movement was also at it's height, the newbs will come flooding back.

Won't ever happen the way it did last time though.

The thing with suitable vehicles is also a large factor. Several people I know who were heavily into veg had no choice but to go back to dino diesel because late model vehicles just won't run on bio or veg. One guy I met actually managed to do an injector pump conversion on his later modeled vehicle to a mechanical type. It wasn't so much a lot of work as needing to be precise and have good fabrication skills. Not something a lot of people would try or could do.

I don't mind the effort and exercise at all of doing veg but also aware that the vehicles that suit my purposes are growing old quick and there are no substitutes coming into the game.
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I got into the veg fuels thing for cost savings and they thought that was wrong not to do it to save the environment. ... I don't know of one, single solitary save the planet type from back when I started that is still doing veg fuel. Most of them, particularly the loud ones were lucky to do it for a couple of years! I have been in it 10 next month. The only people I do know that go back are the ones that hafve always said they are in it for the money.


It's probably an Oz thing, this 'cost savings or to save the environment' choice they seem restricted to. People around here who are still using VO and biodiesel do it for many reasons: to use a resource that would otherwise go to the landfill, to reduce the amount of exhaust pollution, and for the cost savings. I don't know if we would be considered 'save the planet type' by Oz definition, whatever that is.

Most newer diesels can easily run B20, and that has influenced some to make biodiesel rather than try to convert to SVO.

SVO is always easier in a warm climate where it seldom gets below freezing, and especially when there are plenty of older Toyota diesels that can run SVO.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There are almost no Toyota diesels in Florida. When I started diesel was $1.399 per gallon. I am cheap but I am now 45 years old and I do not want to drive an old VW or Mercedes that the A/C either does no work or breaks regularly. It would be like driving a car up north with no heater. Sorry but VW must not be able to handle the Florida weather because they are all bad cars in Florida. I had a 1979 Dasher (Where my id name came from) 1986 Jetta, 1991 Jetta, and a 1999 Beetle TDI. All diesels all never stopped having problems. My thinking was those were all old cars I will get a 2005 Passat Diesel until a local greaser told me how much money he spent fixing his over and over again.

When I gave my 2005 Mercedes E320 CDI to my brother who drives a lot. He gave me his 2006 Jetta 2.5 gas powered car. It ran fine got 17 miles to the gallon and the whole interior was pealing out of the car and next to my CDI is was really slow, rough ride, loud and the light bulbs blew out 5 in less than a month. And it only had 50k miles. This was 3 months ago. I gave the car back to him and took his sons 2006 Buick Lucerne with 218k miles. It was one of my cars before my wife got her Jeep Liberty CRD. The Buick is paid for and I am driving less than 200 miles a week again I have the Jeep for long trips.

I considered leasing a Smart Electric car. $139 per month with $80 for the battery. I have not had a new car since 2000. It would be nice to have a new car. Except that I do not have any money just debt.

I think my point is I have been a greaser for a long time and I have even scaled back.


Robert
In Fort Lauderdale running a 2006 Jeep Liberty CRD 2 veg tanks HOH 2 upgraded greasecar vavles 3/8 fuel line 5/8 heater line HOH Hose wrapped filter. Injector Line heater on the Common Rail. 2nd car 2005 Mercedes CDI, Raw Power fuel pump, 36 gallon veg tank in trunk coolant heated HOH, rubber hose wrapped fuel filter, FPHE, 3 greasecar valves, Common rail line heater.
 
Location: Ft Lauderdale, FL | Registered: June 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
There are almost no Toyota diesels in Florida.

No doubt that's true, my comments specifically related to Oz.

I probably should have said:

SVO is always easier in a warm climate where it seldom gets below freezing, and especially when there are plenty of older Toyota and Mercedes diesels that can run SVO.

For newer diesel vehicles biodiesel is a much better option than SVO.



 
Location: coldest N.America | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A good amount of the new Toyota Diesels have trouble on Diesel let alone anything else.
There are also few that will run bio in more than token amounts seeing they are all running common rail injection and DPF's. Toyota's are not regarded as the first choice in Veg/ bio vehicles anyway. Sure some will work OK with it but others wont and there are other lables that work a lot better.

Mercs capeable of running veg or straight bio haven't been made for about 20 years either and the ones that did run it were slow and less than fun to drive on long trips at highway speeds where they couldn't maintain speed up anything over a bit of a rise in the road. Unfortunately we didn't get the euro spec versions in Tubos other than a small handful of privately imported units.

As maddasher said, Not everyone is inclined to drive older vehicles that require high maintence levels aside from anything else and unless they are turbo have lousy performance levels. Non turbo mercs unless tweaked are almost dangerously slow in the city and lack hill climbing power on the highways.

A friend of mine who is a Bio Guru Updated his old truck about a year ago and did a LOT of homework looking into what he could get to run bio in. The answer he came up with was nothing at all made in the last 10 let alone 5 years. He bought something that showed promise, put 25% Bio in it and immeadieatly had problems. End of story. He's not got to risk a $30K 3 yo truck that even relatively minor engine problems are going to cost a fortune to repair. His company reloacted and much to his delight, they came a long way towards him so his morning commoute is an easy under 15 min cruise in light traffic now. He said he spend less on Diesel now for all the driving he does including a lot of weekend get aways than what he did on Bio before and he has an extra weekend a month that he used to spend makeing bio.

I remember when all the do gooders on veg/ bio forums were all about converting the whole private vehicle fleet to Bio. What a load of ignorance that was on so many levels.
I don't know of a car made in the last 10 years you can run on straight Bio. There is no way in hell I'm going to bother with making bio to run at 20% and clearly few others are inclined to either.

I'm afraid before too long Veg will go back to where it was 10 or 15 years ago because very few people are going to have the inclination to drinve and work on the old bangers that will be the only things left that will run on it.
Cracking WMO, plastic and even veg holds more promise but that makes even those overly complicated Bio making setups people built look basic.
Not to mention the time involved.

Maybe somone can come up with a manufactured/ automated cooker that you put your waste oil in one end and get the the Syndiesel out the other?

Reminds me of those Bio pros. What an expensive toy they were! I wonder how many people that bought them came near getting any sort of return on their investment and how many are lying round idle now?
 
Registered: July 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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