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A small electric flash evaporator to dewater WVO.
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Good find on the data sheet page --

I regularly run the 12 volt DC 1.8 G/M Shurflo pump (part number washed off the tag long ago, 8000- something ?) on my filter setup for 72 to 120 hours continuously while recirculating the oil, have to have a couple thousand hours on it by now. As far as I know it has never tripped off due to the internal thermal breaker, didn't even know it had one.

The pressure it developes depends on how used (clogged) the filters have become, higher pressure takes more amps, the motor draws 6 or more amps at 12 volts DC (150 pounds pressure for the FE ran about 10 amps) (6 amps X 12 volts = 72 watts dissipated in the motor, 10 amps X 12 volts = 120 watts). The oil is never hotter than about 100 deg f but the motor gets hot enough you can't hold your hand on it for more than a couple seconds. Been using this same pump for several years with no problem other than leaks caused by loose screws and overtightening the pressure adjuster and causing the plastic seal under the adjuster to tear and leak (forcing 150 pounds pressure out of a 60 pound pump design).

Shurflo also sells a nifty looking finned extruded aluminum cylindrical heat sink that slides over the motor, never tried it but it coulden't hurt.
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think the only metal in the pump housing is what's in the screws holding it together. (Of course, the motor is mostly metal.)


Brian

2000 Jetta TDI
1982 Mercedes 300D Turbo
1986 Isuzu P'up (NA)
1985 Mercedes 300D Turbo
75/25 WVO/D2 for warm weather
50/50 WVO/D2 for cold weather
Uniqueness is a treasure not to be buried. - Laurence Martel
 
Location: High Point, NC | Registered: May 04, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by PerkHouse:
I think the only metal in the pump housing is what's in the screws holding it together. (Of course, the motor is mostly metal.)


Brian, you're talking about the Shurflo's right? How about the Suntec's, have you opened them and see?

I really hope one of these can take high heat, maybe 200*F


Jojo
 
Location: KTown - Itch Capital of the World | Registered: June 04, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oh sorry, I guess I misunderstood.

As I recall, the Suntecs are all metal (gear pumps) except for the shaft seal and the cover gasket. I think they'd be fine at 300F, but I could be wrong. If you decide to try it, you might want to order a spare shaft seal. I think they're about $5.


Brian

2000 Jetta TDI
1982 Mercedes 300D Turbo
1986 Isuzu P'up (NA)
1985 Mercedes 300D Turbo
75/25 WVO/D2 for warm weather
50/50 WVO/D2 for cold weather
Uniqueness is a treasure not to be buried. - Laurence Martel
 
Location: High Point, NC | Registered: May 04, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by PerkHouse:
Oh sorry, I guess I misunderstood.

As I recall, the Suntecs are all metal (gear pumps) except for the shaft seal and the cover gasket. I think they'd be fine at 300F, but I could be wrong. If you decide to try it, you might want to order a spare shaft seal. I think they're about $5.


Sweet! Thanks

Also on the Suntec web site, some of the flow ratings are only 3 GPH. I believe Tim is using a 3 GPH model. Does the flow increase by removing the strainer? This was the part that was not clear to me so I was planning to order the 7 GPH model.

Jojo
 
Location: KTown - Itch Capital of the World | Registered: June 04, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Suntec flow rate -- There are 3 things that control this. The strainer is first, it is the item that controls the listed flow trate based on fueloil (diesel) fuel. the second thing is the gear set in the pump, there seem to be 4 different gear sets available but I have not found any info indicating what gear set is in what pump, the suntec data sheets show the 4 different flowrates but are not clear as to what portion of a pumps part number deturmines it's gearset. The 3rd item is the RPM of the pump, the listed flow rates are all based on the stated RPM for the specific pump.

For the normal "A" style 3400 RPM pump the flowrate is listed as 3 G/H, in a dealer heating tech web page I found a statment indicating that if the screen is removed these pumps will flow about 17 G/H, this is the only referance to flowrate I have found other than what is listed in the suntec data sheets.

Your 7 G/H pump will likely be a basic pump with a "B" or "N" as the 3rd letter in the part number, B is a 7 gallon strainer with a metal frame, N has a plastic frame.

A complete suntec manual can be downloaded from here. It has the basic pump type info with part numbers plus a lot of info on instalation design of heating fuel systems.

Plastic inside -- The strainer may have a plastic frame, the shaft seal is also plastic. there is also a small plastic/rubber seat on the end of the output fitting, this is used to block the output flow at low pressure, not really used for our purposes once you modify the pump to output oil at any RPM but may deteriorate and plug up an internal passage at high temps ?
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Tim, thanks.

I was able to purchase from ebay a Suntec pump with its motor already connected. Its called a Carlin EZ-1.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=270031402407

What do you think? Sounds like a good price to me.

For folks who want this kind of pump, there's another one just like this but it is now at $152 dollars. Just do a search on "Carlin".

Also, when you were using a plain old ball valve as the nozzle, did the ball valve fail on you by leaking out. The guy over at Lowe's swears that the brass ball valve will not take 300*F. He thinks the teflon lining on the ball will melt causing the liquid to leak. He also indicated that the leak will flow out the stem where the handle is connected. Any experience with this. I will have the option of coolant heat so my 4500W 220 V (run at 110V) water heater might be able to heat more and I could increase the flow rate. That is why I am opting for a straight ball valve as nozzle instead of the fixed size orifice. I understand I may need to readjust it constantly. Any other thoughts about this?
 
Location: KTown - Itch Capital of the World | Registered: June 04, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well - That is one way to get a motor connected to a pump, This is a complete oil fired furnace burner unit, including air blower housing, burner nozzle, ignition transformer and all. There will be quite a few used burners on ebay this time of year, sometimes pretty cheap, usually costs more to ship than to buy. These are available under several brand names, I do a search for "oil burner' To catch most of the sales.

Ball valve -- I don't think there is any problem with the teflon "melting out", takes a lot more heat for that. It does change enough somehow that the ball valve looses its stiffness and won't hold itself in position well (just realized I never even thought of simply tightening down on the packing nut, probably all I needed to do ?), This is the reason you need to constantly moniter it, it may shift open/closed at any time, the valve did drip a bit under pressure when closed so some clearances opened up someplace. The packing in the stem was not a problem, this is usally also teflon, if it leaks a bit simply tighten the packing nut down a bit (you can buy replacement teflon packing "string").

There are brass ball valves available that have the 2 sections of the body held together by only a press fit, these I would NOT use with this amount of heat, too much possibility of them slipping apart. the only valve I would use here is one that has the body screwed together.
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Tim c cook:
Well - That is one way to get a motor connected to a pump, This is a complete oil fired furnace burner unit, including air blower housing, burner nozzle, ignition transformer and all. There will be quite a few used burners on ebay this time of year, sometimes pretty cheap, usually costs more to ship than to buy. These are available under several brand names, I do a search for "oil burner' To catch most of the sales.

Ball valve -- I don't think there is any problem with the teflon "melting out", takes a lot more heat for that. It does change enough somehow that the ball valve looses its stiffness and won't hold itself in position well (just realized I never even thought of simply tightening down on the packing nut, probably all I needed to do ?), This is the reason you need to constantly moniter it, it may shift open/closed at any time, the valve did drip a bit under pressure when closed so some clearances opened up someplace. The packing in the stem was not a problem, this is usally also teflon, if it leaks a bit simply tighten the packing nut down a bit (you can buy replacement teflon packing "string").

There are brass ball valves available that have the 2 sections of the body held together by only a press fit, these I would NOT use with this amount of heat, too much possibility of them slipping apart. the only valve I would use here is one that has the body screwed together.


You're right about the oil burners being really cheap. I found this one for somebody if they want one. Bummer, I already bought mine.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1300...name=ADME:L:RTQ:US:1


Thanks for the valve stuff.
 
Location: KTown - Itch Capital of the World | Registered: June 04, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by JojoJaro:
Also, when you were using a plain old ball valve as the nozzle, did the ball valve fail on you by leaking out. The guy over at Lowe's swears that the brass ball valve will not take 300*F. He thinks the teflon lining on the ball will melt causing the liquid to leak.


Nah, teflon melts at more than 450 deg C.


Blessings. Joe 1999 Chevy Suburban w/new optimizer 6500 TD and 1995 Chevy Cube van 6.5L. WWW.RillaBioFuels.com
WWW.RillaBioFuels.com
 
Location: Sterling Hts. Michigan USA | Registered: October 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am adding the following link to another related discussion started by SunWizard and cronicalling his testing using a small commercial engine lube oil cleaning centrifuge normaly used on large diesel engines. He is cleaning veg with it and has found that it also acts as a flash evaporator for dewatering, interesting and looks like very promising info.

Dieselcraft centrifuge works great -My filter and dewater rig

I have just finished building the new temp controller and pump pressure interlock units for my FE, hope to get it dewatering a 300 gallon tank of oil tomorrow so I will be posting info and pictures of these upgrades shortly.
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Felt I needed to better describe what my system looks like. Basically, it's what Brian has been using based on Tim's design.

I've got 3 x 0.016 orifices and a SUNTEC pump running at the reduced speed with the plate modification that Brian showed me (thanks).

I've piggy-backed two heater elements, each with a WATLOW. I try to run the first (4500W element) at 75C and the second (5500W element at the 140C. I guess that spread out the heat density I've read about.

I started doing this at 120 psi and always stay above 140C on my heaters. I've run as low as 55 psi without any water in the frying pan. Probably not good, so will try to keep up pressure. Ran at 110 psi on two orifices yesterday (one clogged).

Blowing across with a fan to get rid of steam but need to collect mist to avoid the mess.

I just put an extra vent line to serve as a retun so that I cool down to 30C before shutting down. Hopefully, this will avoid crusting up. I cleaned each time starting out, but now do every other time or when clogged. Getting about 7 GPH.

Need to consider the centrifuge, but things are working well. I don't see the "spooge" in the final product and always heat test my oil 5 minutes in and before transferring to my finish barrel.


Mike Goodman
High Point, NC

83 MB 300SD (2 tank) - Greasel
98 Dodge 2500 (2 tank) - Golden Fuels
82 Rabbit Truck (2 tank) - my design) - SOLD
Diesel Craft CF process in enclosed shed
BD first batch 9/23/12, still going ..
6-4x10 solar hot water panels and 500 gallon wood-burning water stove
2.8 kW PV grid-tie w/batt b/u commissioned March 2011
 
Location: High Point, NC | Registered: September 30, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I finaly got the new heater pipe, electronic temp control, and pump pressure interlock installed on the FE, Been testing it over the last couple days. I have a bit of a leak from the heater element threads so my method of mounting these is not always 100% sucessfull on the first try, I will pull the element and try several wraps of teflon tape eventually, simply using a catch-can under the element for now.

I have been a bit baffled as I have not seen any steam and very little condensed oil vapor from the unit and the output oil is hotter than normal. I made several changes to the output water/oil vapor condensing portion of the unit so thought it had something to do with that but finaly measured the flow rate and find it is only around 3 G/H (should be 5 G/H) so the filter prior to the orifice is partially plugged, this reduces the pressure across the orifice A LOT so this is likely the reason I am not seeing steam, will clean the filter and run another test tomorrow.

The simple temp controller works fine, it consists of a LM-34 temp sensor epoxied inside of a normal brass automotive type temp sensor housing, a potentiomiter to set the desired temp, and one 8-pin comparitor IC driving a 15 amp AC solid state relay. The comparitor has a small amount of positive feedback added so that it switches on/off cleanly. In operation the heater is turned on hard until the oil reaches the set temp, then the controller starts pulsing the heater on/off about 15 times/sec. I have an LED indicator to show when the heater is on/off, When the heater is full-on the led is bright, as the set temp is reached the led grows dimmer until it goes out after about 2 seconds, stays out a while as the temp of the oil overshoots the set point, then as the oil in the heater pipe cools the led grows brighter again until it and the heater is again full-on. It looks like the heater just can not transfer heat to the oil fast enough to run in the on/off switching mode ? The max temp deviation with this controller is 8 deg f including the up/down overshoot. The area where the controller pulses the heater on/off is within about 2 degrees of the set point temp but the temp of the oil overshoots the setpoint when being heated or when cooling, this is still a lot better than the 30-40 degree fluctuation I was seeing when using the salvaged kitchen range oven thermostat. Holding the temp at some absolute fixed temp is not needed as long as the lowest temp still causes the water to burst into steam.

The pump pressure interlock using a salvaged air compressor pressure switch works as intended, loss of pressure turns off the power to everything and you need to manually reset it to get everything running again, makes me feel better about letting the unit run 24/7 unattended. I will try to "attach" pictures and the schematics here later.
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't know if using several small orifices is better than using one larger one, have not done any testing on this yet.

I got an email from Luis describing the unit he has up and running. It uses a 4000 watt water heating element mounted vertically beside the flash tank, temp controlled by some type of commercial controller, vapor containing flash tank looks like a helium balloon or freon type tank (a bit smaller than a B-B-Q propane tank) using a small computer cooling type fan for the vapor evacuating air flow, the orifice is .032 diameter, and using a 150 pound shurflo pump. The unit dewaters successfully at a 10 G/H flow rate. Hopefully luis will check back here and post more details on his unit. Tried to "attach" his picture but no-go.
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Anybody ever seen anything like this at the bottom of the FE delivery barrel?

http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/album/553768640Rlhyww

I've been trying to post, but am doing something silly. I'll describe my process as questions arise.

Thanks.


Mike Goodman
High Point, NC

83 MB 300SD (2 tank) - Greasel
98 Dodge 2500 (2 tank) - Golden Fuels
82 Rabbit Truck (2 tank) - my design) - SOLD
Diesel Craft CF process in enclosed shed
BD first batch 9/23/12, still going ..
6-4x10 solar hot water panels and 500 gallon wood-burning water stove
2.8 kW PV grid-tie w/batt b/u commissioned March 2011
 
Location: High Point, NC | Registered: September 30, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I wondered what you meant by "spooge" -- I have not seen the fluffy stuff you show in the bottles or the bottom of the barrel, it looks like very fine particulate that got past the filtering process prior to the FE but can't swear to it. I do see something similar to the the "sticking crusty" stuff. I run my hot flashed oil into metal 5 gallon jerry cans for storage, I have found one chunk of this stuff about the size and shape of your index finger but about 1/16 inch thick at the bottom of several of these cans once the oil has cooled to ambiant. These are not "crusty" but sort of rubbery plastic type stuff, I assume it is something that has vulconized or polimerized due to the heat of the process. This did not go through the tiny orifice all at once so had to be either extremely small particals or even a liquid as it went through my .018 inch orifice. It must have some pretty strong attraction for similar material as it all seems to end up in the one big clump as the oil cools. I would rather have this happen in the bottom of my storage cans rather than in the vehicle fuel tank. I always use a windowscreen filter in the funnel when filling the vehicle tank so it catches this clump of stuff before it makes it into the vehicle fuel tank.

I see that you are using the same small high-temp hydraulic oil filter that I am using, be sure to solvent clean these well when shutting down the FE for a long enough period for everything to cool down to ambiant. I forgot this again last time and the 90 micron cintred brass filter element is really plugged up now. I tried to clean it for about an hour today using verious solvents and compressed air but had little success. I removed the oriface and reversed the filter housing on the FE so I could pump hot pressurized oil backwards through the filter, had to replace the internal spring with a stack of 3 steel washers with grooves ground across them (to allow oil flow past them) to get the element fitting tightly against it's internal rubber gasket. It seems to have done a fair job of cleaning the element after circulating hot oil for about 10 minutes but not sure yet, I had intended to let the oil cool down while circulating so that it got thicker and should have created a higher pressure across the filter, went away for a few minutes, when I returned I found that my pump pressure cutoff switch had shut everything down because the small 12 volt fan motor I have been using to turn the suntec pump had siezed up, was after dark by then so will replace this brass bushinged fan motor with a ball bearing salvaged scooter motor tomorrow and complete trying to clean the filter by circulating cold diesel through it backwards for a couple hours.

I see you have placed a pressure guage directly above the orifici (?), I will be doing this shortly so I get an accurate pressure reading on the orifice rather than reading the pressure only before the filter, reading both guages will give the pressure drop across the filter to indicate when it is plugging up.

While running the FE with the mostly-plugged filter I was not seeing any steam being released, the flowrate measured to about half of what it should have been as most of the 150 pounds pressure was being dropped across the filter. Half the flow should translate to about 1/4 the pressure across the orifice, this would be about 37.5 pounds, this is not enough to cause the steam to flash as normal even though the oil exiting my flash tank was up to about 260 deg f, seems some higher pressure than this is needed to get the water to liberate as visable steam ? Another post indicated there unit had succesfully worked down to 55 pounds but not as well as at a higher pressure, I also have seen this, a big differance from 100 pounds to 150 pounds, higher pressure releases more visable steam, or maybe that it is releasing more steam/oil vapor - don't know, the oil that was processed at the lower pressures always tested dry even though it did not release visable steam?

Suntec pump and hot oil -- While circulating oil trying to clean the clogged filter I turned the heater element on, the oil got up to 230 deg f, this hot oil was being pumped through the suntec pump for about 10 minutes. There was no visable indication of the pump having any problem with this temp of oil, the shaft seal did not leak or show any change in apperance due to the heat and it pumped the hot oil just fine.
I attribute the pump motor sieziure to the fact that i had cranked its input volts up to about 20 volts to increase the flowrate through the backwards filter, I suspect this overheated the motor and caused the bushings to sieze on the motor shaft.

Suntec pump guage port -- Found out that when a guage is screwed into the pumps designated "guage" port it does NOT read the actual pump output pressure ?? It must be reading the internal preset pressure somehow. When pumping oil backwards through the filter my pressure interlock switch would not switch to the "ON" condition even though the guage was reading 150 pounds, I will eventually plumb the guage directly into the pump output fitting rather than the designated "guage" port to get a true reading of pressure going to the FE.
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Anybody ever seen anything like this at the bottom of the FE delivery barrel?



This just looks like high melt point wvo to me..fats/tallows/hydrogenated. Take a sample of the cloudy material and warm it gently. If the coudiness dissapears this is what it is.
 
Location: Central MN..Brrrrrr! | Registered: November 06, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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tim, if any dirt is getting past my filtration, then I have to rethink my whole process. All I’m doing is running hanging-bag filters, but it’s a 50-5-1 process with about 2 volumes through each stage. I don't dewater for weeks after that and I've not emptied my "filtered/stored" barrels.

Like you, Tim, I considered it all got by the 0.016” orifices and then clumped back up. That's where the "reheat" test comes in, but the garage was at 70F. I suppose the barrel's contents were as well, but who knows?

I always get steam to some degree (even at 55 psi and 145C). Maybe water condensed in the barrel since I’m just blowing a fan across. [I need to do the mist collection.] Then, like you suggest, it “glommed up” and made the ugly mess at the bottom.

I think it’s a flaky version of the fatty stuff I see at the bottom of a cubee on a cold morning made “clumpier” or “flakier” by the heat. Now, if there’s 1/2-cup of this stuff after 100 gallons, then maybe I should not worry. I must check the bottom of my 55-gallon “go” tanks and then pump using a 10-micron Golden Rod out of that, I suppose.

I used to gravity into cubees, but have been pumping off the top. In the end, I want to collect from bottom using pump. I have a double-flange arrangement at the bottom of my receiver barrel. This raises the drain about 1/2-inch. I should add a 1- inch nipple to further protect any drain collection.

Are 0.016 orifices too small, I wonder? Any thoughts? What I recall about orifices is that once you push to a certain point (psi) adding pressure gets very little additional flow. I was just thinking that the pressure drop across the 0.016 would induce more steam. I’m getting 7 GPH on 3 orifices, but suppose I could go to a bigger diameter. Have some people using 0.025 orifices? I’ve been meaning to go stainless steel, anyway.

I’ll keep the cintered brass filter element as clean as possible. It’s got a lot of area all around and I’ve never seen it clogged, just a flake or two. I’m hoping that bypassing the orifices (off the air-dampener, below gauge) has allowed the oil to cool enough (30C) to avoid carbonizing. I’d like that to allow me to clean only when I see diminished pressure (every other time?). This would depend on how long it sits, too, I would think. The longer it sits uncleaned, the harder it would get?

Just so it’s understood, my recirced hot oil goes back to my feed tank as it cools down, never back through the pump. Give the temps and volumes it should never get past 150F, I'd think.

Want to compliment you on the whole process, Tim. Hadn't thought about back flow, for example. Could put in a second gauge at the pump to check DP across filter. Good idea.

Dana, thanks for the idea about heating things up. I'll bring it up to 150 slowly and then see what that does.


Mike Goodman
High Point, NC

83 MB 300SD (2 tank) - Greasel
98 Dodge 2500 (2 tank) - Golden Fuels
82 Rabbit Truck (2 tank) - my design) - SOLD
Diesel Craft CF process in enclosed shed
BD first batch 9/23/12, still going ..
6-4x10 solar hot water panels and 500 gallon wood-burning water stove
2.8 kW PV grid-tie w/batt b/u commissioned March 2011
 
Location: High Point, NC | Registered: September 30, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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... looks like high melt point wvo to me..fats/tallows/hydrogenated. Take a sample of the cloudy material and warm it gently. If the coudiness dissapears this is what it is.


Bingo! Thanks, Dana. The top 85% of the quart mason jar was clean and dry. Below that was the junk and that went to liquid fast. It dissolved quickly around 160 in the skillet. A little stirring and it was gone. The last little bit in the jar was gray. I'm guessing, what? Animal fat? Left it out over night to see how it congeals.

Neat thing! Put in a 20-feet coil of 1/2-inch copper in my receiver barrel through which I pass my feed. Using doubled up black iron foot flanges(?) with some compression fittings. Wish now that I'd gotten the 1/2 NPT x 1/2 elbow compression fittings. Would have made the fitting up LOTS easier.

Recouping the heat dropped my receiver barrel from (guessing) 230F (couldn't touch but a second) to 160F (meat thermometer). There was a noticable increase in the "off" period of my WATLOW controller cycle.

Timed my cool-down using my vent. Took 10 minutes to go from 140C to 30C. Figure it will reduce carbonizing of hot oil.

I'll watch this stuff like a hawk, but for now I'm happy. Thanks, all ...


Mike Goodman
High Point, NC

83 MB 300SD (2 tank) - Greasel
98 Dodge 2500 (2 tank) - Golden Fuels
82 Rabbit Truck (2 tank) - my design) - SOLD
Diesel Craft CF process in enclosed shed
BD first batch 9/23/12, still going ..
6-4x10 solar hot water panels and 500 gallon wood-burning water stove
2.8 kW PV grid-tie w/batt b/u commissioned March 2011
 
Location: High Point, NC | Registered: September 30, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Glad to hear it is high-meltpoint fats. I get maybe a half-cup of "whites" at the very bottom of each of my jerry cans, assumed this to be high melt fats, it is always creamy and flowing, not wierd flakey . My storage cans don't have open tops so never saw what this stuff might look like except as it was being poured out of the can.

Suntec pump internal pressure regulator -- My plugged filter caused me to delve in to how the suntec pump pressure regulator is configured. I had a pressure guage installed in the factory designated "guage" opening. It measured the adjustable pressure but while backflushing my filter I could not get my 60 pound pressure interlock to engage even though the guage showed 150 pounds. Turns out the output fitting is actually sort of an "overflow" output rather than being directly connected to the guage port, has to due with wanting the original oil burner not wanting to see pressure until the pump is up to speed. For my use I want the output to be available no matter the RPM of the pump and the guage should read the actual pressure on the output. I plugged the connection that the factory calls the "output" and now have everything connected to the "guage" output, this increased the flowrate of the pump considerably. Now the only function of the internal pressure regulator is to limit the max pressure, the guage shows the actual pressure being applied to the FE. If the flow rate of the output is more than the pump can supply (due to turning at a slow RPM or a blown output hose) the pressure never reaches the preset pressure.

I replaced the seized 12 volt fan motor with the salvaged ball bearing 24 volt sidewalk scooter motor, should have used this motor originally. The fan motor always ran hot enough you could not hold your hand on it, the scooter motor is barely warm and turns as fast on 12 volts as the other motor, in fact since I switched to the guage port as the output the scooter motor can be run on 6 volts and still move more than the 5 G/H needed by the FE as the pressure stays at the preset pressure of 150 pounds.

Plugged high-temp filter -- The backflushing seemed to clear this filter as there was "0" pressure showing while pumping a lot of hot oil through it. I reassembled the filter into it's normal configuration and everything worked well for the first hour or so then the flow through the FE dropped down to about 2 G/H after a couple hours, this was again after dark so will try to figure this out tomorrew, I did not have a guage to install on the output of the filter so it may be either the filter or the orifice getting plugged up. To insure I am not pumping dirty oil into the FE I have added a second output to my filter barrel setup, the FE feed oil will now be coming from the output of my last 5 micron filter. The high-temp sintered brass filter element should not be plugging, it is a 90 micron rating and all the oil being fed to it has been filtered at least 30 passes through 5 micron filters, I am concerned that something in the hot oil might be reacting with the brass and causing the plugging, it is becoming a neusence, I may simply remove the filter element for now and see if I plug the orifice. I have a .032 orifice on hand, may move up to this since it looks like the mods to the suntec pump will likely be able to supply the 10 G/H flow rate. I will likely have to run the heater on 220 volts to make the required amount of heat for this higher flow rate.

Orifice size -- I don't see any problem with .o16 other than it is more easily plugged up, the pressure applied directly to the tiny .o16 orifice opening as 150 pounds pressure on the oil is only .o3 pounds pressure, The orifice can be plugged by even tiny amounts of soft fats at that tiny pressure (I have found soft fat clogging my .018 orifice).

Don't know what effect larger orifice sizes will have on dewatering. Luis is using a .032 orifice with no problem at a flow rate of about 10 G/H. I suspect there is no problem unless the orifice was to get realy big, say 1/4 inch, may not even be a problem then, don,t know. For any reasonable flow rate we might be working at I don't think there would be any problem. The flowrate goes up 4 times each time you double the orifice ID, my .018 = about 5 G/H, Luis says his.032 = 10 G/H (?, would have expected more like 20 G/H), .064 (approx 1/16 inch) would be about 40 G/H (or 80 G/H ?), .128 (1/8 inch) would be 160 G/H (or 320 G/H ?). Need a good sized pump to hold 150 pounds pressure at these high flow rates (power steering pump should do ok at the 40 G/H rate (or even 80 G/H), (one is flowing 54 G/H at 90 pounds pressure in the lube oil centrifuge discussion) but I suspect they would dewater just fine, deffinitely would cause less of a problem with plugging up the orifice, could probably eliminate the high-temp filter all together if the oil has been prefiltered.

Heat recovery coil -- Glad to hear this works well. This will be my next modification, I intend to add 12 feet of 3/16 OD steel fuel line as a coil submerged in the hot oil in the lower portion of the flash tank. The pump will first move the cold oil through this then into the heater pipe, should reduce the heater on-time considerably (or allow a smaller heater running 100% of the time).

Orifice flow rate with pressure -- I don't know if there is a practical upper limit to this or not but from reading you have to increase the pressure 4 times to double the flow through the orifice so holding an exact pressure is not all that critical for our use.
 
Location: fisher,illinois,usa | Registered: June 03, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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